Mirror comparison

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Danny Colyer, Mar 22, 2005.

  1. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    I recently bought a Heads Up mirror from Kinetics, after breaking my
    second 3rd Eye mirror. After using the 3rd Eye for nearly 2 years and
    the Heads Up for 3 weeks, I thought I'd post a comparison:

    Both mirrors attach to the arm of a pair of glasses. Both have an
    extension arm protruding forwards from the top of the attachment
    mechanism, with the mirror hanging from the end of the extension arm.

    Each mirror is connected to the extension arm by a ball-and-socket
    joint, allowing easy adjustment while riding. At the other end, the
    extension arm of the 3rd Eye is connected to the attachment mechanism by
    a second ball-and-socket joint. The Heads Up has a continuous arm, made
    of a stiff but flexible plastic that is supposed to stay put once it has
    been bent into position.

    The second ball-and-socket joint makes the 3rd Eye easier to adjust
    while riding, but also makes it more prone to being knocked out of
    alignment by a clumsy attempt at adjustment. The flexible arm of the
    Heads Up will only bend sideways, it cannot be adjusted up and down.
    The 3rd Eye can be adjusted up and down by a few degrees.

    Both mirrors attach via a 3-pronged arm. In each case, the outer 2
    prongs are intended to go on the outside of the glasses arm, while the
    central prong goes on the inside. The 3rd Eye has a straight attachment
    arm with the prongs moulded off-centre. Attaching the 3rd Eye bends
    both the attachment arm and the glasses arm slightly. The Heads Up has
    a curved attachment arm, which should put less stress on the thick arm
    of a pair of cycling glasses but which also makes the mirror much less
    secure when attached to the thin arm of a pair of regular glasses.

    Both mirrors are designed for the US market. When you buy them, both
    will be set up for attachment to the left hand arm of your glasses.
    This is not a problem with the 3rd Eye, as the extension arm can be
    rotated on the ball-and-socket joint and the mirror is then ready to
    attach to the right hand arm. This is not an option with the Heads Up.

    The instructions for the Heads Up recommend mounting it with the central
    prong on the outside and the outer prongs on the inside if you wish to
    attach it on the right. I tried this once and was not happy with the
    way it bent the arm on my cycling glasses. I then took the time to bend
    the attachment arm so that I could mount it on the right with the outer
    prongs on the outside. This bent the glasses less. It also,
    pleasingly, bent the glasses less than the 3rd Eye.

    The attachment arm of the 3rd Eye is notorious for snapping after a
    while, usually in cold weather when the plastic is brittle. In my
    experience they last about a year (they're good enough that I don't
    actually object to having to replace them once a year). Hopefully the
    Heads Up will be more durable.

    Both mirrors are about the same width (29mm). While the 3rd Eye is
    round, the Heads Up is longer vertically (42mm). The extra length of
    the Heads Up will allow you to get a good view behind you over a wider
    range of head angles and will probably make it more useful than the 3rd
    Eye for upright cyclists. It also means that the inability to adjust
    the extension arm up and down is not a serious problem. Bear in mind,
    though, that a bigger mirror will give a bigger blind spot.

    The elliptical shape of the Heads Up is somewhat disconcerting if you're
    used to the round 3rd Eye. It looks as though the mirror is angled
    slightly away from you. That's not a serious problem and only takes a
    few days to get used to.

    The extension arm of the 3rd Eye is more rigid than that of the Heads
    Up. I have noticed some vibration of the Heads Up mirror, something
    that I have never found to be a problem with the 3rd Eye.

    Overall I think the 3rd Eye is slightly the better mirror, mostly
    because of the vibration with the Heads Up. Because of the slight
    differences in the attachment mechanisms, which mirror suits you best
    might depend on the glasses that you wear for cycling. I find the Heads
    Up more comfortable because it bends the arm on my cycling glasses less.

    The Heads Up is probably better for use during the winter months, when
    the brittle 3rd Eye attachment arm is prone to snapping and when clumsy
    adjustment attempts while wearing thick gloves tend to knock the 3rd Eye
    out of alignment.

    --
    Danny Colyer (the UK company has been laughed out of my reply address)
    <URL:http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/danny/>
    "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." - Thomas Paine
     
    Tags:


  2. Danny Colyer <[email protected]> writes:

    > I recently bought a Heads Up mirror from Kinetics, after breaking my
    > second 3rd Eye mirror. After using the 3rd Eye for nearly 2 years and
    > the Heads Up for 3 weeks, I thought I'd post a comparison:


    [snip]

    The one I have is the Take-a-Look mirror. This comprises a square mirror
    on the end of series of metal tubes that rotate within each other. This
    gives the mirror adjustment in all three planes - yaw, roll, and
    pitch. It attaches to the glasses arm via metal prongs that are covered
    with a thick plastic sheath.

    I love mine. A nice big square mirror, really easy to adjust, and seems
    very sturdy. I've not noticed any vibration problems - no problems at
    all, in fact.

    --
    Keith Willoughby http://flat222.org/keith/
    Twll Dyn Pob Saes
     
  3. John Mallard

    John Mallard Guest

    Danny Colyer wrote:
    > I recently bought a Heads Up mirror from Kinetics, after breaking my
    > second 3rd Eye mirror. After using the 3rd Eye for nearly 2 years and
    > the Heads Up for 3 weeks, I thought I'd post a comparison:


    Thanks for that Danny. Very good info.

    Any difference in weight?

    And, 'cos I'm lazy, got any urls, so I can compare prices?

    --
    Cheerful Pedalling
    John Mallard
     
  4. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Keith Willoughby wrote:
    > The one I have is the Take-a-Look mirror. This comprises a square mirror
    > on the end of series of metal tubes that rotate within each other. This
    > gives the mirror adjustment in all three planes - yaw, roll, and
    > pitch. It attaches to the glasses arm via metal prongs that are covered
    > with a thick plastic sheath.


    I've read good things about the Take-a-Look and I'd quite like to try
    one. Do you know where I could order one from and for how much.

    I know that ICE do them, but no price is listed and I don't know if they
    do online ordering:
    <URL:http://www.ice.hpv.co.uk/trike_details_general_accessories.htm#takealook>

    --
    Danny Colyer (the UK company has been laughed out of my reply address)
    <URL:http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/danny/>
    "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." - Thomas Paine
     
  5. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    John Mallard wrote:
    > Any difference in weight?


    According to my kitchen scales they weigh 8g apiece.

    > And, 'cos I'm lazy, got any urls, so I can compare prices?


    <URL:http://www.kinetics.org.uk/html/mirrors.shtml>

    --
    Danny Colyer (the UK company has been laughed out of my reply address)
    <URL:http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/danny/>
    "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." - Thomas Paine
     
  6. Danny Colyer <[email protected]> writes:

    > Keith Willoughby wrote:
    >> The one I have is the Take-a-Look mirror. This comprises a square mirror
    >> on the end of series of metal tubes that rotate within each other. This
    >> gives the mirror adjustment in all three planes - yaw, roll, and
    >> pitch. It attaches to the glasses arm via metal prongs that are covered
    >> with a thick plastic sheath.

    >
    > I've read good things about the Take-a-Look and I'd quite like to try
    > one. Do you know where I could order one from and for how much.


    I bought mine from Paul Budge, psmc [@] ukonline.co.uk . It was 13.25
    UKP including P&P and a CTC discount. IIRC it was a quid or two extra
    without the discount. Couldn't fault the service.

    --
    Keith Willoughby http://flat222.org/keith/
    Fair and balanced
     
  7. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    Danny Colyer <[email protected]> wrote in news:d1q4pn$uop$2
    @newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk:
    >
    > <URL:http://www.kinetics.org.uk/html/mirrors.shtml>
    >


    Has anyone used the "Viewpoint" mirror that you can see on that page? I
    quite like the idea but was wondering how good it actually is.

    Graeme
     
  8. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Danny Colyer wrote:
    > I recently bought a Heads Up mirror from Kinetics, after breaking my
    > second 3rd Eye mirror. After using the 3rd Eye for nearly 2 years and
    > the Heads Up for 3 weeks, I thought I'd post a comparison:


    <snip useful review>

    I have a 3rd Eye... somewhere! I used it for a bit but ultimately
    didn't find it did much more than the Cyclestar attached to the bike,
    which I don't need to faff about attaching to my glasses. Hence the
    somewhat vague idea of its current whereabouts... :-(

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  9. On 23 Mar 2005 04:01:08 GMT, Graeme <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Danny Colyer <[email protected]> wrote in news:d1q4pn$uop$2
    >@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk:
    >>
    >> <URL:http://www.kinetics.org.uk/html/mirrors.shtml>
    >>

    >
    >Has anyone used the "Viewpoint" mirror that you can see on that page? I
    >quite like the idea but was wondering how good it actually is.
    >

    I did. Clever idea, very awkward in practice.
    Tried 3d eye too; the ball sockets meant the mirror was constantly out
    of adjustment, and they don't work on narrow-framed glasses.
    I now use (and am very happy with) a Look-back mirror
    http://www.dutchbikes.nl/bodies/onderdelen.htm#017 (scroll almost all
    the way down).

    Mark van Gorkom.
     
  10. "Danny Colyer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I recently bought a Heads Up mirror from Kinetics, after breaking my second
    >3rd Eye mirror. After using the 3rd Eye for nearly 2 years and the Heads
    >Up for 3 weeks, I thought I'd post a comparison:

    _snip_

    If you wear a helmet try a Reflex Cycleaware mirror, available from SJS
    (hawk, spit). I've used one for years and find it excellent although I have
    glued a safety line across the mirror ball joint as the mirror can become
    detached if the helmet is handled roughly when not being worn.

    Ken
     
  11. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Kenneth Clements wrote:
    > If you wear a helmet try a Reflex Cycleaware mirror, available from SJS
    > (hawk, spit). I've used one for years and find it excellent although I have
    > glued a safety line across the mirror ball joint as the mirror can become
    > detached if the helmet is handled roughly when not being worn.


    I wear a helmet on only a few days of the year, if it's icy or
    particularly windy. I used to wear one through most of the winter,
    because I used it to mount lights to. I tried a helmet mounted mirror a
    few years ago and didn't get on with it at all - I gave it to a friend,
    who ended up gaffer taping it to a pair of glasses!

    --
    Danny Colyer (the UK company has been laughed out of my reply address)
    <URL:http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/danny/>
    "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." - Thomas Paine
     
  12. LSMike

    LSMike Guest

    Danny Colyer wrote:
    > I recently bought a Heads Up mirror from Kinetics, after breaking my
    > second 3rd Eye mirror. After using the 3rd Eye for nearly 2 years

    and
    > the Heads Up for 3 weeks, I thought I'd post a comparison:

    <snip>

    Nice one, thanks for the gen. I got a B&M cyclestar mirror for the
    handlebars of my Hurricane, it's great and I really like it. Of course
    you pretty much need one on a recumbent, and although I didn't like the
    idea on my ordinary, I'm starting to feel one would be nice to have on
    there. I've never tried a helmet/glasses mounted one.
     
  13. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    LSMike wrote:
    > Nice one, thanks for the gen. I got a B&M cyclestar mirror for the
    > handlebars of my Hurricane, it's great and I really like it. Of course
    > you pretty much need one on a recumbent, and although I didn't like the
    > idea on my ordinary, I'm starting to feel one would be nice to have on
    > there. I've never tried a helmet/glasses mounted one.


    You might find it useful for skating as well. I find it useful for
    unicycling.

    --
    Danny Colyer (the UK company has been laughed out of my reply address)
    <URL:http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/danny/>
    "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." - Thomas Paine
     
  14. LSMike

    LSMike Guest

    Danny Colyer wrote:

    > You might find it useful for skating as well. I find it useful for
    > unicycling.
    >


    Of course I've just realised I'm talking rubbish, I have a Reevu
    helmet. It's quite good actually, acceptable view behind you. The
    only real problem for me was that I felt it was too warm in the summer.
     
  15. the.Mark

    the.Mark Guest

    Danny Colyer wrote:
    > Kenneth Clements wrote:
    >> If you wear a helmet try a Reflex Cycleaware mirror,
    >> available from SJS (hawk, spit). I've used one for years and
    >> find it excellent although I have glued a safety line across
    >> the mirror ball joint as the mirror can become detached if
    >> the helmet is handled roughly when not being worn.

    >
    > I wear a helmet on only a few days of the year, if it's icy or
    > particularly windy. I used to wear one through most of the
    > winter, because I used it to mount lights to. I tried a
    > helmet mounted mirror a few years ago and didn't get on with
    > it at all - I gave it to a friend, who ended up gaffer taping
    > it to a pair of glasses!


    I use a helmet mounted mirror and I find it quite good but now I'm
    thinking of giving up the helmet I've been considering some way of using the
    mirror on my glasses. I don't fancy the gaffer tape route though.
    --
    Mark

    1x1 wheel, 3x2 wheels & 1x3 wheels.
     
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