Mirror Helmets

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Kenny, Jul 10, 2003.

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  1. Kenny

    Kenny Guest

    I stll don't wear a helmet but I was thinking of buying one now after some nutter in a Porsche got a
    bit too close for comfort. Has anyone tried one of the new Reevu helmets with the built in mirror.
     
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  2. Eric Nolan

    Eric Nolan Guest

    "Kenny" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I stll don't wear a helmet but I was thinking of buying one now after some nutter in a Porsche
    > got a bit too close for comfort. Has anyone tried one of the new Reevu helmets with the built
    > in mirror.

    I've got one and it's a good idea but the design has problems.

    For the mirror to work properly the front has to be positioned just above your brow line (so that
    you can see it). If the helmet is tilted back on your head at all you won't be able to see the
    mirror at all. Unfortunately there is quite a substantial peak at the front so if the helmet is in
    the correct position to see the mirror everything that is more than a bit above my eyeline is
    blocked. I have a hybid bike so I sit up quite straight generally, I do lean forwards some times
    though and when I do the helmet blocks my line of sight noticeably. I have a long downhill on the
    way home from work and since I am tilted forwards by geography on this I find the helmet blocks my
    forward vision substantially. If it is a choice between seeing out the front or the back (which
    unfortunately it seems to be) I choose the front, so I wear the helmet tilted back a bit making the
    mirror useless. Basically I spent €110 on a helmet when a €10 one from Aldi probably would have done
    the job just as well.

    Before I bought this I read of other potential problems with it. One was that the sun behind you
    would blind you through the mirror - I never found this to be a problem. Another was that your hair
    would block the light path in the helmet - I don't think so since there are pads which press your
    hair down, perhaps particularly unruly hair might stick up between the pads. Ventilation was raised
    as an issue - it seems fine, the airflow is sufficient. Finally the usefulness on a road bike where
    you are leaning forward a lot and a recumbent where you are leaning back meaning that the mirror is
    pointing at the wrong place - based on my experience with an upright bike I'd say this would be a
    major problem.

    Eric.
     
  3. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    Kenny wrote:
    > I stll don't wear a helmet but I was thinking of buying one now after some nutter in a Porsche
    > got a bit too close for comfort. Has anyone tried one of the new Reevu helmets with the built
    > in mirror.

    I've heard that another problem with them is that, because they are attached to your head, they can
    be very disorientating as the view moves with your head movements making it difficult to percieve
    exactly what you are looking at. A handlebar mounted mirror doesn't have this problem as the
    position of the mirror is more fixed in space.

    I find it's easier and safer to turn my head and look behind. Not only do I get a better understand
    of what's going on behind, but it also sends out a message to drivers that I am about to
    manoooooover (sp?), in addition to a signal, of course.

    Simonb
     
  4. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Simonb" <sbennettatwiderworlddotcodotuk> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Kenny wrote:
    > > I stll don't wear a helmet but I was thinking of buying one now after some nutter in a Porsche
    > > got a bit too close for comfort. Has anyone tried one of the new Reevu helmets with the built in
    > > mirror.
    >
    > I've heard that another problem with them is that, because they are
    attached
    > to your head, they can be very disorientating as the view moves with your head movements making it
    > difficult to percieve exactly what you are
    looking
    > at. A handlebar mounted mirror doesn't have this problem as the position
    of
    > the mirror is more fixed in space.
    >
    > I find it's easier and safer to turn my head and look behind. Not only do
    I
    > get a better understand of what's going on behind, but it also sends out a message to drivers that
    > I am about to manoooooover (sp?), in addition to a signal, of course.
    >
    > Simonb
    >
    >

    Yeah, I saw these recently and my main thought about potential problems would be that in time, I
    could potentially become a little more lazy than I'm comfortable with....which in turn could
    possibly lead to an accident due to my missing something by checking the mirror rather than over my
    shoulder... Dave.
     
  5. John Hearns

    John Hearns Guest

    On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 23:54:49 +0100, Dave wrote:

    >
    > Yeah, I saw these recently and my main thought about potential problems would be that in time, I
    > could potentially become a little more lazy than I'm comfortable with....which in turn could
    > possibly lead to an accident due to my missing something by checking the mirror rather than over
    > my shoulder...

    I think motor cyclists call these 'life savers' and they are trained to do them during CBT. I try
    to do them all the time - and as you say, I HOPE it sends some signals to at least some drivers
    who notice.
     
  6. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Simonb wrote:

    > I find it's easier and safer to turn my head and look behind. Not only do I get a better
    > understand of what's going on behind, but it also sends out a message to drivers that I am about
    > to manoooooover (sp?), in addition to a signal, of course.

    All very true. But I do like a mirror, all the same. Though one must be aware that you can get a
    "false negative", and *always* double check with a look over your shoulder, the nice thing about
    mirrors is that a quick glance that tells you something is there won't be a "false positive": if you
    see something in the mirror, it's there, and you're forearmed with that knowledge before you decide
    how/when to make a manoeuvre and take time to look over your shoulder.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  7. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Simonb
    <[email protected]?.?.invalid> writes
    >Kenny wrote:
    >> I stll don't wear a helmet but I was thinking of buying one now after some nutter in a Porsche
    >> got a bit too close for comfort. Has anyone tried one of the new Reevu helmets with the built in
    >> mirror.
    >
    >I've heard that another problem with them is that, because they are attached to your head, they can
    >be very disorientating as the view moves with your head movements making it difficult to percieve
    >exactly what you are looking at.

    Plenty of people use helmet mounted mirrors and don't find this problem , I think it's something you
    soon adjust too. (though I don't like them myself.

    > A handlebar mounted mirror doesn't have this problem as the position of the mirror is more fixed
    > in space.
    >
    >I find it's easier and safer to turn my head and look behind. Not only do I get a better understand
    >of what's going on behind, but it also sends out a message to drivers that I am about to
    >manoooooover (sp?), in addition to a signal, of course.

    I feel prefer having a mirror. It means I can monitor what's going on behind me, so I don't have to
    look behind so often. I feel exactly the opposite, I don't think that looking behind gives me a good
    idea about what is going on compared to my mirror.

    They have their limitations, as do mirrors on motorbikes and cars, it's just about using
    them sensibly.
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  8. Simonb wrote:

    > I've heard that another problem with them is that, because they are attached to your head, they
    > can be very disorientating as the view moves with your head movements making it difficult to
    > percieve exactly what you are looking at.

    I hesitate to dismiss out of hand this POV as Clearly Bollocks, but I've been using helmet and/or
    glasses mounted mirrors - which also move with yer gulliver - for years, and have not found this to
    be the case.

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  9. "John Hearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I think motor cyclists call these 'life savers' and they are trained to do them during CBT. I try
    > to do them all the time - and as you say, I HOPE it sends some signals to at least some drivers
    > who notice.

    I find that when switching lanes i look behind TWO times a couple of seconds apart before switching
    as this gives more information about the *velocity* of an approaching car, than just looking the
    once. (Obviously if I see no cars at all the first time then the second look ain't required!)
     
  10. Kit Wolf

    Kit Wolf Guest

    On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 19:08:19 +0100, Simonb wrote:

    > Kenny wrote:
    >> I stll don't wear a helmet but I was thinking of buying one now after some nutter in a Porsche
    >> got a bit too close for comfort. Has anyone tried one of the new Reevu helmets with the built in
    >> mirror.
    >
    > I've heard that another problem with them is that, because they are attached to your head, they
    > can be very disorientating as the view moves with your head movements making it difficult to
    > percieve exactly what you are looking at. A handlebar mounted mirror doesn't have this problem as
    > the position of the mirror is more fixed in space.

    Using a helmet mounted mirror, I had this problem - partly because it got moved every time I took
    the helmet off. I did get used to it after a week or so though. White lines on roads help in this.

    > I find it's easier and safer to turn my head and look behind. Not only do I get a better
    > understand of what's going on behind, but it also sends out a message to drivers that I am about
    > to manoooooover (sp?), in addition to a signal, of course.

    I'd agree with this, but I think mirrors have a different place. On fast rural roads it can be
    useful to keep an eye on what's coming up behind, even if you're not making a maneuver. People
    who've forgotten they're pulling sticky-out things like caravans, or lorries that don't seem to be
    pulling out. Time to take the center lane, or perhaps the hedge...

    KW
     
  11. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "Adrian Boliston" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "John Hearns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > I think motor cyclists call these 'life savers' and they are trained to do them during CBT. I
    > > try to do them all the time - and as you say, I HOPE it sends some signals to at least some
    > > drivers who notice.
    >
    > I find that when switching lanes i look behind TWO times a couple of
    seconds apart
    > before switching as this gives more information about the *velocity*
    of an
    > approaching car, than just looking the once. (Obviously if I see no
    cars at all
    > the first time then the second look ain't required!)

    That is the way that 10-year olds are taught to do it in the current Safer Cycling course (what used
    to be called Cycling Proficiency).

    --
    Mark South: Citizen of the World, Denizen of the Net "I wonder why so many Finnish traditions are
    related with booze?"
    - Juha Sakkinen
     
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