Mirror

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Per LöWdin, Apr 15, 2003.

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  1. Per LöWdin

    Per LöWdin Guest

    Hi

    Mostly we ride MTB, but lately we have taken to road riding, not least because we found some
    irresistable Klein Qs ( some of the last Chehalis made). We find cars really scary on twisting
    narrow roads. When the wind comes from the wrong direction you don´t know that they are there before
    they are in the midst of overtaking you.

    So, I would like to have a tiny mirror that can be fitted at the end of the drop bar. Should be
    really small to minimize "draft".

    Would be grateful for any suggestions.

    Per http://user.tninet.se/~ipg289h/fu99/MTB.html
     
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  2. David Moore

    David Moore Guest

    "Per Löwdin" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > So, I would like to have a tiny mirror that can be fitted at the end of the drop bar. Should be
    > really small to minimize "draft".

    I've found that small bar mirrors either didn't offer enough overall view of the road or were too
    concave to see anything not right on one's ass.

    I've been happy with Third Eye mirrors. http://www.3rd-eye.com/ The mirror is closer to my eye so I
    can get a bigger image with a smaller mirror. I can easily scan the whole road with just slight
    turns of my head. I wish the mounts on the eye glass versions were stronger, but I understand the
    reasoning behind it of better safe than sorry.

    --
    See X-Face for e-mail address.
     
  3. Per LöWdin

    Per LöWdin Guest

    > I've been happy with Third Eye mirrors. http://www.3rd-eye.com/ The mirror is closer to my eye so
    > I can get a bigger image with a smaller mirror. I can easily scan the whole road with just slight
    > turns of my head. I wish the mounts on the eye glass versions were stronger, but I understand the
    > reasoning behind it of better safe than sorry.

    Are they easy to take off? Riding singletrack in the woods there is not really any need for a
    mirror. It is just now when we are riding more on road I feel it would be good to have the
    possibility of getting some advance warning.

    Found the Reevu http://www.reevu.com/product_design.htm intersting but wonder if there is some
    major drawback.

    Per http://user.tninet.se/~ipg289h/fu99/MTB.html
     
  4. Your better off with one that mounts to your glasses, or your helmet if you don't want the weight of
    it dragging your glases down your nose.

    The ones that mount on your bike are IME, too shaken up to see anything.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  5. The third Eye Pro is the model I like best. It has the largest size mirror making for the widest
    view, and nearly every part can be disassembled and replaced (write the company and tell them which
    part you need.

    It also has the most versatile adjustment

    http://www.3rd-eye.com/

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  6. David Moore

    David Moore Guest

    "Per Löwdin" <[email protected]> wrote in news:nQ%[email protected]:

    >> I've been happy with Third Eye mirrors. http://www.3rd-eye.com/ The mirror is closer to my eye so
    >> I can get a bigger image with a smaller mirror. I can easily scan the whole road with just slight
    >> turns of my head. I wish the mounts on the eye glass versions were stronger, but I understand the
    >> reasoning behind it of better safe than sorry.
    >
    > Are they easy to take off? Riding singletrack in the woods there is not really any need for
    > a mirror.

    They're easy to take off and come with a small plastic case for storage, but unless you're riding
    through the brush with branches hitting your glasses, I see no need to take them off. After a week
    or two, I hardly noticed the mirror was there unless I looked at it.
     
  7. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Per Löwdin" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:nQ%[email protected]...
    >
    > Are they easy to take off? Riding singletrack in the woods there is not really any need for a
    > mirror. It is just now when we are riding more on road I feel it would be good to have the
    > possibility of getting some advance warning.

    I just fold mine back against my ear when I'm off the bike or in the woods. I do find it useful when
    I'm leading off-road rides. It's also handy at the beach.
     
  8. "Per Löwdin" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi
    >
    > Mostly we ride MTB, but lately we have taken to road riding, not least because we found some
    > irresistable Klein Qs ( some of the last Chehalis made). We find cars really scary on twisting
    > narrow roads. When the wind comes from the wrong direction you don´t know that they are there
    > before they are in the midst of overtaking you.
    >
    > So, I would like to have a tiny mirror that can be fitted at the end of
    the
    > drop bar. Should be really small to minimize "draft".
    >
    > Would be grateful for any suggestions.
    >
    > Per http://user.tninet.se/~ipg289h/fu99/MTB.html

    Hi Per,

    Busch and Mueller make an interesting looking one that I'm thinking about. It's only about 9 EURO.

    http://www.roseversand.de/rose_main.cfm?cid=170&ktg_id=1169&prd_id=0&mid=0&s pr_id=1

    Also on that page is a smaller, more aerodynamic version which costs about 20 EURO more.

    Worth a look if you don't want to deal with helmet or glasses mounted mirrors.

    Rob
     
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