Miyata 610 balance issue

Discussion in 'Touring and recreational cycling' started by toddk, Jul 12, 2017.

  1. toddk

    toddk New Member

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    HI there,
    I have a Miyata 610 and it has never been easy to ride it with no hands. Always leaning to one side. Any suggestions about how to balance a bike?
     


  2. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FYI ...

    The problem which you describe will manifest itself if the fork is DAMAGED ... the legs are probably skewed by what may be a barely perceptible amount ...

    Unfortunately, the only remedy for the average person (i.e., a person who is not a FRAME BUILDER) is to buy a replacement fork ... while a damaged steel fork can be repaired, it is NOT easy to remedy ... and, it had better be a heck-of-a-collectible (i.e., "rare") fork for a person to bother to have it repaired.​

    Figure on a cost of $40+ if you DIY as far as the removal-and-replacement ...

    I recommend that you DON'T get a fork intended for 27" wheels even if your bike has 27" wheels-and-tires unless you absolutely need to use a front fender.

    While a threaded fork will allow you to use the bike's existing headset, it will require MORE (IMO) effort to trim the length of the steerer whose amount of threads you will need to be sure are present and then chase the threads where you make the cut ...

    OR, you may have to have additional threads added to the steerer which will cost you anywhere from $5-to-$25 per inch depending on the shop.​

    Presuming that you are not a purist, a threadless fork + appropriate headset are the better option UNLESS you have a friend who saved the fork from a bike which was converted to a threadless fork way-back-when..
     
  3. toddk

    toddk New Member

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    Thank you for your suggestion.
    I am not that knowledgeable about bike engineering and did not know what would be the balance issue, however now you have offered a suggestion that I can explore.

    The Miyata 610 is not a valuable collector item in my opinion, however it is a good solid bike that has stood the test of time. It has been a great work horse despite the balance issue.

    As a touring bike I would not consider riding without fenders. For me they are mandatory so I will need to find a solution that allows for the fenders.

    Thanks for your suggestion and now to pursue the solution.


     
  4. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    It's not about balance, it's about alignment.

    The fork may lean to one side.
    Or have slight changes in dropout depth/placement.
    The head tube may lean.
    The rear stays can be off either sideways or vertical.

    I'd start by putting the bike upside down, then eyeballing the wheels.
    They should both track and be in the same plane.
    If they don't its time to investigate. Try a search for "measuring frame alignment" for hints and tips.
     
  5. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    While the fork could be the issue, it could be something as simple as the wheels are out of true, which I think you're the same guy who had to repair the wheels earlier. Also you need to make sure the handlebar and seat are in line with the frame, one or the other or both could cause the bike to lean. Another odd thing, which is rare but the bike is older is that the headset could be worn which isn't allowing the bike to self center and instead is wanting to center to another position; you can check this by lifting the bike up by the top tube and move the handle bar slightly to the right and see if wants to go left or vice a versa. A loose headset could also cause this issue.

    Always check the least expensive thing first then move up the next least expensive thing, just don't jump at the fork because that will cost the most and it could be something that will cost a lot less money.
     
  6. jbca

    jbca New Member

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    Riding a bicycle requires not only control of balance but also independent use of upper and lower sections of the body and the two sides of the body. Practice your glide until you can keep your feet up for three seconds. Look ahead of you at where you want to go, instead of focusing on obstacles to avoid. Keep your eyes up and always look ahead instead of down, it will assist you maintain balance and observe your line of vision. There’s a common misconception that if you didn’t learn to ride a bike as a kid, you’ve “missed your window” and it’s too late as an adult.
     
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