Modify or buy new?



Xa3phod

New Member
Mar 27, 2014
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Hey folks. Here is my issue. A few months ago I bought a 2014 Specialized Hard Rock. I have always rode mountain bikes so I figured I would continue the trend. The issue is, I don't really go off road too often and I am very unforgettable on the bike. Its a very large bike (XL) and I am 6'5". I am tired of leaving forward and having to crane my neck up to see, it starts to get sore after 30 minutes.

So, should I buy a new comfort bike or should I modify this bike to fit my needs? I recently had a very large stem installed and it seemed to help a little, but still, my neck and arms hurt after a while. Should I bother swapping out the handlebars for a large upright one and get a comfy seat? Or, just sell it and get a bike made for comfort?

I like the 29er look and style. I need front suspension and I prefer 27-30 gears, and of course hydraulic disks. And..it needs to be an upright and really comfy bike.

Thanks for the advice.

Xa3phod
 

oldbobcat

Well-Known Member
Aug 31, 2003
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Originally Posted by Xa3phod
So, should I buy a new comfort bike or should I modify this bike to fit my needs? I recently had a very large stem installed and it seemed to help a little, but still, my neck and arms hurt after a while. Should I bother swapping out the handlebars for a large upright one and get a comfy seat? Or, just sell it and get a bike made for comfort?
Xa3phod
I don't know, but I have one more tip to try before you throw in the towel. The pain you're feeling in the shoulders and neck is from carrying too much weight there. Your center of gravity is forward of your feet and you're doing push-ups to keep your chin off the handlebar.

To get the center of gravity over your feet, where it should be, slide the saddle back a centimeter or two or three, if there's room on the rails, and lower it a bit to compensate for the added stretch. You're going to reach farther forward for the handlebar, but because you'll be able to support your torso with back muscles, it should cause less strain. Make sure it's level, too, so you're not sliding off the nose.

Try this for a while and see if it reduces the strain and pain. If it does, revisit the idea of a handlebar with more rise or a shorter stem.

The Rockhopper is a rugged and versatile bike, and it would be a shame to give up on it. Besides, the flat-bar hybrids that are actually fun to ride have similar cockpit geometries.
 

alfeng

Well-Known Member
Jul 23, 2005
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Quote: Originally Posted by Xa3phod
So, should I buy a new comfort bike or should I modify this bike to fit my needs? I recently had a very large stem installed and it seemed to help a little, but still, my neck and arms hurt after a while. Should I bother swapping out the handlebars for a large upright one and get a comfy seat? Or, just sell it and get a bike made for comfort?
Xa3phod


FWIW. In addition to adjusting one's riding position on the bike, be aware that there are numerous handlebar options ...

Either a "beach cruiser" handlebar or "mustache" handlebar with their rearward sweep might help your riding position on the bike & alleviate your neck/shoulder/arm problem ...

BUT, you will probably need to change the stem to accommodate the <b>25.4</b> center section.

BMX handlebars are available with a higher rise than MTB handlebars have.

"Stingray" handlebars must still be available as yet another option if oldbobcat's suggestion doesn't help.
 

Froze

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2004
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Maybe all you need is to exercise your neck? see this if you're interested: http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/finder/lookup/filter/muscle/id/6/muscle/neck
 

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