Monthly running data

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Cox, Dec 6, 2003.

  1. Cox

    Cox Guest

    Can one of you guys who knows what you are doing comment on my November running log? First
    off... my pace is slow, I know... I don't feel that I am losing enough weight for the distance
    that I am doing... granted, it's not a lot of distance... but there should be more weight loss,
    shouldn't there??

    This is our first month of training for LA in March. I am training with my sister who is quite a bit
    slower then I am. I would like to speed up, but don't want to discourage her.

    Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!

    Nov 03 Week Starting Monday27 Oct 03 miles time pace Date Dist Time Pace Type Weight 01Nov03 5m
    50m 10m00s run 211.00p Wk Sum 5m 50m 10m00s 211.00p Week Starting Monday03 Nov 03 03Nov03 3m
    30m 10m6s easy run 212.00p 04Nov03 5m 56m 11m58s easy run 214.00p 06Nov03 3m 31m 10m28s easy
    run 209.00p 08Nov03 6m 1h4m 10m29s long run 210.00p Wk Sum 17m 3h2m 10m45s 211.25p Week
    Starting Monday10 Nov 03 10Nov03 5m 51m 10m49s easy run 210.00p 11Nov03 5m 53m 10m30s easy run
    208.00p 13Nov03 5m 50m 10m34s easy run 210.00p 15Nov03 7m 1h16m 10m50s long run 209.00p Wk Sum
    21m 3h49m 10m40s 209.25p Week Starting Monday17 Nov 03 17Nov03 5m 50m 10m34s easy run 209.00p
    18Nov03 6m 1h9m 11m17s easy run 208.00p 20Nov03 5m 51m 10m12s easy run 212.00p 22Nov03 9m 1h27m
    10m13s long run 209.00p Wk Sum 24m 4h17m 10m34s 209.50p Week Starting Monday24 Nov 03 24Nov03
    6m 1h1m 10m11s easy run 208.50p 25Nov03 7m 1h10m 9m44s easy run 208.00p 27Nov03 6m 1h4m 10m18s
    easy run 207.50p 29Nov03 9m 1h36m 10m38s long run 213.00p Wk Sum 28m 4h51m 10m13s 209.25p Mth
    Sum 96m 16h49m 10m31s 209.88p
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>, cox wrote:
    >
    > Can one of you guys who knows what you are doing comment on my November running log? First off...
    > my pace is slow, I know...

    Running at a slow pace isn't a problem. Unless you're a very fast 200lb runner, going at 10min/mile
    or slower is fine.

    > I don't feel that I am losing enough weight for the distance that I am doing... granted, it's not
    > a lot of distance...

    You should be able to lose close to 1lb/week on 20mpw at your weight. If you aren't losing that
    much, you need to adjust your diet.

    > This is our first month of training for LA in March. I am training with my sister who is quite a
    > bit slower then I am. I would like to speed up, but don't want to discourage her.

    (1) Most beginners train at too high a speed anyway. Going slower won't hurt.
    (2) When two people train together, the slower person needs to set the pace. You can't have a
    give-and-take compromise -- the faster of the two runners needs to come down to the slower
    runners pace.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  3. Perdy Tired

    Perdy Tired Guest

    "cox" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Can one of you guys who knows what you are doing comment on my November running log? First
    > off... my pace is slow, I know... I don't feel that I am losing enough weight for the distance
    > that I am doing... granted, it's not a lot of distance... but there should be more weight loss,
    > shouldn't there??

    Well, I've ran for over 6 years now, and didn't see any weight loss until this last year. I peaked
    at close to 220 lbs. about a year ago, and I'm just under 200 lbs. now. There was no change in
    diet... Hey I like to eat, that's why I was 220 lbs. I doubled my running mileage from 25 miles
    per month to 50, and my training runs are usually 10-12 minute miles, as well as doubling my
    cycling mileage.

    > Nov 03 Week Starting Monday27 Oct 03 miles time pace Date Dist Time Pace Type Weight Mth Sum
    > 96m 16h49m 10m31s 209.88p

    I would think that if I'm seeing weight loss at 50 miles per month, at 96 miles, you should be
    seeing something? As Donovan suggested, I think your diet must be looked into? Are you eating more
    to compensate for your running?

    Lastly, recording your weight on a daily basis seems a little obsessive? From day to day, I likely
    gain as much as you after eating a meal or loose as much after a visit to the crapper? Make some
    positive changes (diet, etc.), quit worrying about the scale, and the weight will fall away. Heck, I
    hadn't weighed myself since last winter, and it wasn't until I started putting my (now loose) fall
    clothes back on, that I jumped on the scale again to see what was up.

    Perdy.
     
  4. Lyndon

    Lyndon Guest

    >Can one of you guys who knows what you are doing comment on my November running log? First
    >off... my pace is slow, I know... I don't feel that I am losing enough weight for the distance
    >that I am doing... granted, it's not a lot of distance... but there should be more weight loss,
    >shouldn't there??
    >
    >This is our first month of training for LA in March. I am training with my sister who is quite a
    >bit slower then I am. I would like to speed up, but don't want to discourage her.
    >
    >Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
    >

    Dropping weight on limited mileage is actually not that simple. 20-25 miles/wk is what the average
    running club member is running, and many have some trouble dropping much weight.

    One mile of running (or walking) burns about 100 calories, so 24 miles/wk burns 2400 calories. 3500
    calories roughly equals 1 pound. So your running is worth
    2/3 pound per week. So far, so good.

    The catch is you have to keep your eating in check. The energy expenditure from running is worth 350
    calories per day, and it is quite possible to increase consumption by more than this, in which case
    you end up gaining weight. I've noticed a fair number of slow marathoners (meaning here 4-6 hour
    marathons) who actually gain weight during training. People running 70 miles/wk and more have to
    worry about just getting in enough food to avoid losing weight, but people running relatively light
    mileages really do have to worry about gaining.

    Running at faster paces will not increase energy expenditure if you cover the same distance, but it
    seems to reduce appetite later. I know I don't feel as much like eating after 6 X 400 than after a 5
    mile easy run (recovery). If you gradually increase your mileage from 24 to 40+, your problem will
    likely be self correcting.

    Lyndon

    "Speed Kills...It kills those that don't have it!" --US Olympic Track Coach Brooks Johnson
     
  5. "cox" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Can one of you guys who knows what you are doing comment on my November running log?

    It's an average loss of .07 lbs/day (10% fit with linear regression), or .13 lbs/day (38% fit), not
    counting Thanksgiving, which is 1 lb/week.
     
  6. More jogging, less posting.
     
  7. fagpimp

    fagpimp Guest

    On Sun, 30 Nov 2003 18:53:16 +0000 (UTC), Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Running at a slow pace isn't a problem. Unless you're a very fast 200lb runner, going at 10min/mile
    >or slower is fine.

    Or if you are a lil treadmill jogger.

    >You should be able to lose close to 1lb/week on 20mpw at your weight. If you aren't losing that
    >much, you need to adjust your diet.
    >

    Yeah, here's a guy to take advice on weight loss from. He weighs 150lbs wet, and thinks he was
    "fat". Yet he will tell you how to lose weight, even though he's never had a weight problem.
     
  8. Cox

    Cox Guest

    Thanks Donovan! I appreciate your advice.

    "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, cox wrote:
    > >
    > > Can one of you guys who knows what you are doing comment on my November running log? First
    > > off... my pace is slow, I know...
    >
    > Running at a slow pace isn't a problem. Unless you're a very fast 200lb
    runner,
    > going at 10min/mile or slower is fine.
    >
    > > I don't feel that I am losing enough weight for the distance that I am doing... granted, it's
    > > not a lot of distance...
    >
    > You should be able to lose close to 1lb/week on 20mpw at your weight. If
    you
    > aren't losing that much, you need to adjust your diet.
    >
    > > This is our first month of training for LA in March. I am training with my sister who is quite a
    > > bit slower then I am. I would like to speed up, but don't want to discourage her.
    >
    > (1) Most beginners train at too high a speed anyway. Going slower won't
    hurt.
    > (2) When two people train together, the slower person needs to set the
    pace.
    > You can't have a give-and-take compromise -- the faster of the two runners needs to come down to
    > the slower runners pace.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > --
    > Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, Lyndon wrote:

    > One mile of running (or walking) burns about 100 calories, so 24 miles/wk burns 2400 calories.

    That figure is based on a body weight of about 140lb. Most people who are trying to lost weight,
    including the poster, are quite a bit heavier than that. He would drop about 1lb/week if he ate
    maintenance for an inactive lifestyle.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  10. Becca

    Becca Guest

    > Lastly, recording your weight on a daily basis seems a little obsessive?

    Actually, there is a book out about 7 lifestyle habits of people who have successively kept off 30+
    lbs. for 5+ years.

    It turns out one of their habits is to weigh themselves fairly frequently (more than 3 times a week
    for about 1/2 the group).

    But their first habitat is that they expect to fail (i.e. gain back small amounts of weight) but
    resolve to just keep working at it.

    So as long as you know that those small day to day increases are normal, the small losses can
    motivate you to keep going.

    And if you weigh yourself consistently (not constantly), you will know when you have plataued and
    can adjust diet/weight accordingly.

    Clothing works for some folks. For me, I found that even though my activity has increased certain
    clothing fit tighter (developing runner's thighs after years of scrawny swimmer legs).

    Just remember that in the end, you are more than a number...whether your weight or your PR.

    ~b

    >From day to day, I likely gain as much as you after eating a meal or
    loose
    > as much after a visit to the crapper? Make some positive changes (diet, etc.), quit worrying about
    > the scale, and the weight will fall away. Heck, I hadn't weighed myself since last winter, and it
    > wasn't until I started putting my (now loose) fall clothes back on, that I jumped on the scale
    > again to see what was up.
    >
    > Perdy.
     
  11. Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    > You should be able to lose close to 1lb/week on 20mpw at your weight. If you aren't losing that
    > much, you need to adjust your diet.

    The weight down .07 lbs/day (12% fit, linear regression), or .13 lbs/day (39% fit), not counting
    Thanksgiving, which is 1lb/week.
     
  12. Bagpimp

    Bagpimp Guest

    On Sun, 30 Nov 2003 15:04:47 -0800, "cox" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Thanks Donovan! I appreciate your advice.
    >
    Suuuuuuuucker!
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:
    > On Sun, 30 Nov 2003 18:53:16 +0000 (UTC), Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Running at a slow pace isn't a problem. Unless you're a very fast 200lb runner, going at
    >>10min/mile or slower is fine.
    >
    >
    > Or if you are a lil treadmill jogger.
    >
    >>You should be able to lose close to 1lb/week on 20mpw at your weight. If you aren't losing that
    >>much, you need to adjust your diet.
    >>
    >
    > Yeah, here's a guy to take advice on weight loss from. He weighs 150lbs wet, and

    157 excluding clothing on an empty bladder.

    > thinks he was "fat". Yet he will tell you how to lose weight, even though he's never had a weight
    > problem.

    Maybe we have differing standards, but I call this a weight problem:

    http://www.pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/weights/littlefatty1.jpg
    http://www.pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/weights/littlefatty2.jpg

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  14. bagpimp

    bagpimp Guest

    On Mon, 1 Dec 2003 02:29:06 +0000 (UTC), Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >157 excluding clothing on an empty bladder.
    >
    >> thinks he was "fat". Yet he will tell you how to lose weight, even though he's never had a weight
    >> problem.
    >
    >Maybe we have differing standards, but I call this a weight problem:
    >
    >http://www.pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/weights/littlefatty1.jpg
    >http://www.pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/weights/littlefatty2.jpg

    You don't have a weight problem, you have a mental problem.
     
  15. In article <[email protected]>, Lyndon wrote:

    > One mile of running (or walking) burns about 100 calories, so 24 miles/wk burns 2400 calories.

    That figure is based on a body weight of about 140lb. Most people who are trying to lost weight,
    including the poster, are quite a bit heavier than that. He would drop about 1lb/week if he ate
    maintenance for an inactive lifestyle.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  16. Becca

    Becca Guest

    > Lastly, recording your weight on a daily basis seems a little obsessive?

    Actually, there is a book out about 7 lifestyle habits of people who have successively kept off 30+
    lbs. for 5+ years.

    It turns out one of their habits is to weigh themselves fairly frequently (more than 3 times a week
    for about 1/2 the group).

    But their first habitat is that they expect to fail (i.e. gain back small amounts of weight) but
    resolve to just keep working at it.

    So as long as you know that those small day to day increases are normal, the small losses can
    motivate you to keep going.

    And if you weigh yourself consistently (not constantly), you will know when you have plataued and
    can adjust diet/weight accordingly.

    Clothing works for some folks. For me, I found that even though my activity has increased certain
    clothing fit tighter (developing runner's thighs after years of scrawny swimmer legs).

    Just remember that in the end, you are more than a number...whether your weight or your PR.

    ~b

    >From day to day, I likely gain as much as you after eating a meal or
    loose
    > as much after a visit to the crapper? Make some positive changes (diet, etc.), quit worrying about
    > the scale, and the weight will fall away. Heck, I hadn't weighed myself since last winter, and it
    > wasn't until I started putting my (now loose) fall clothes back on, that I jumped on the scale
    > again to see what was up.
    >
    > Perdy.
     
  17. Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    > You should be able to lose close to 1lb/week on 20mpw at your weight. If you aren't losing that
    > much, you need to adjust your diet.

    The weight down .07 lbs/day (12% fit, linear regression), or .13 lbs/day (39% fit), not counting
    Thanksgiving, which is 1lb/week.
     
  18. In article <[email protected]>, Lyndon wrote:
    > Donovan Rebbechi wrote:
    >
    >>In article <2003120[email protected]>, Lyndon wrote:
    >>
    >>> One mile of running (or walking) burns about 100 calories, so 24 miles/wk
    >>burns
    >>> 2400 calories.
    >>
    >>That figure is based on a body weight of about 140lb. Most people who are trying to lost weight,
    >>including the poster, are quite a bit heavier than that. He would drop about 1lb/week if he ate
    >>maintenance for an inactive lifestyle.
    >>
    >
    > Whether it's 0.7 lb/wk or 1 lb/wk isn't the issue.
    >
    > The issue is that runners doing limited mileage at slow paces burn relatively small amounts of
    > energy--less so than many people realize.

    I don't think this is correct. In fact I'd argue the opposite -- that people often underestimate
    the calories used during exercise. For example, you underestimated it substantially in the
    previous post.

    However, to an even greater extent, people also underestimate the calories they consume. This is why
    300lb people "can't lose weight" despite the fact that they "eat right". For example, the other
    poster claimed not to have changed his diet, a claim that almost certainly wouldn't stand up to more
    rigorous scrutiny.

    > There seems to be a natural tendency to increase the intake when running in this manner, so if you
    > go to running clubs and look at people, you can see slow marathoners who are heavy, even while
    > training for a marathon. Some of them actually GAIN weight while training for a marathon.

    YMMV, I've found that I have an extremely hard time holding onto body weight when I run high milage,
    whether it's slow or fast.

    I suspect that in the case of these marathon runners, it could well have a lot to do with conscious
    decisions to increase carb consumption, or at least get "adequate" amounts of carbs, which amounts
    to the same thing.

    Performance nutrition and nutrition for weight loss are conflicting demands, and a high milage
    marathon runner is almost certainly more interested in eating for performance than they are in
    eating for weight loss, which means they'll almost certainly eat more high glycemic index carbs than
    someone whose primary objective was to lose weight.

    > The solution is to:
    >
    > (a) restrict intake (which can be simply running fast enough to reduce the desire to eat after
    > the run); or

    Is there any evidence that running faster suppresses appetite ? Never heard of this, I wouldn't
    recommend beginners run faster in any case -- my impression is that most beginners are already
    training at around threshold pace as it is.

    Some dietary changes that would make sense IMO are simply a more close monitoring of diet, in
    particular paying careful attention to protein consumption and taking care to avoid overeating high
    glycemic index carbs.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  19. Pimpola

    Pimpola Guest

    On Mon, 1 Dec 2003 21:36:41 +0000 (UTC), Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >I don't think this is correct. In fact I'd argue the opposite -

    Of course, he's an idiot, and a treadmill jogger.
     
  20. Bagpimp

    Bagpimp Guest

    On Sun, 30 Nov 2003 15:04:47 -0800, "cox" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Thanks Donovan! I appreciate your advice.
    >
    Suuuuuuuucker!
     
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