More bloody metal plates...

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Richard, Apr 23, 2006.

  1. Richard

    Richard Guest

    Tags:


  2. Richard wrote:
    > I'm more than half inclined to suspect that the spikes bit is a hoax,
    > given the extreme reticience of the site to show the system in action.


    They weren't reticent on the local TV news, where they demonstrated it
    deflating a set of (car) tyres. I doubt the metal plates will be much of
    a problem to me as a cyclist since I tend to cycle around petrol station
    forecourts with extreme care anyway, due to other hazards.

    Bob
     
  3. Paul - xxx

    Paul - xxx Guest

    Richard came up with the following;:
    > ...to skid on in wet weather:


    > I'm more than half inclined to suspect that the spikes bit is a hoax,
    > given the extreme reticience of the site to show the system in action.
    > But even so, the metal plates look seriously unpleasant in wet weather.


    Did you even read the articles?

    They're plates on the forecourts, indeed next to the petrol pumps, of a
    garage that suffers from 'drive-aways'. Not, normally, somewhere you'd
    cycle.

    --
    Paul ...
    (8(|) Homer Rules ..... Doh !!!
     
  4. Paul Boyd

    Paul Boyd Guest

    On 23/04/2006 17:20, Richard said,
    > ...to skid on in wet weather:


    Only if you're in the habit of cycling past petrol pumps. Not many of
    us actually need to do that :)

    --
    Paul Boyd
    http://www.paul-boyd.co.uk/
     
  5. Richard

    Richard Guest

    Paul - xxx wrote:
    > Richard came up with the following;:
    >
    >> ...to skid on in wet weather:

    >
    >
    >> I'm more than half inclined to suspect that the spikes bit is a hoax,
    >> given the extreme reticience of the site to show the system in action.
    >> But even so, the metal plates look seriously unpleasant in wet weather.

    >
    >
    > Did you even read the articles?
    >
    > They're plates on the forecourts, indeed next to the petrol pumps, of a
    > garage that suffers from 'drive-aways'. Not, normally, somewhere you'd
    > cycle.


    Not only did I read the article, I went to the website of the company
    that sells them: www.drivestop.com. If you'd done that, you would have
    seen, in the photographs...

    http://www.drivestop.com/full/enter_0.jpg
    http://www.drivestop.com/full/exit_0.jpg

    ....that the plates go across the entrance and exit to the petrol
    station, not beside the pumps at all. You may be in the habit of
    flying into petrol stations on your bike, or possibly tunnelling up onto
    the forecourt, but I suspect most cyclists will choose the more
    conventional route - which will involve going over the plates.

    R.
     
  6. Richard

    Richard Guest

    Paul Boyd wrote:
    > On 23/04/2006 17:20, Richard said,
    >
    >> ...to skid on in wet weather:

    >
    >
    > Only if you're in the habit of cycling past petrol pumps. Not many of
    > us actually need to do that :)


    They go across the entrance and exit of the forecourt, not by the pumps
    themselves. See the manufacturer's website.

    R.
     
  7. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    Richard wrote:

    >...to skid on in wet weather:
    >
    >http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/south_yorkshire/4928000.stm
    >http://www.drivestop.com
    >
    >I'm more than half inclined to suspect that the spikes bit is a hoax,
    >given the extreme reticience of the site to show the system in action.
    > But even so, the metal plates look seriously unpleasant in wet weather


    Twonk!!

    Since when did cyclists ride through the pumps at a petrol station.

    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
  8. Doki

    Doki Guest

    "Richard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > ...to skid on in wet weather:
    >
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/south_yorkshire/4928000.stm
    > http://www.drivestop.com
    >
    > I'm more than half inclined to suspect that the spikes bit is a hoax,
    > given the extreme reticience of the site to show the system in action. But
    > even so, the metal plates look seriously unpleasant in wet weather.


    I'll remember next time I take my bike into a petrol station. I can only
    ever remember doing it once...
     
  9. Mark McNeill

    Mark McNeill Guest

    Response to Phil Cook:
    > Hmmm let me see. I can count on the thumbs of one hand the number of
    > times I have visited a filling station when not driving a car and have
    > never ever ridden into a filling station on a bicycle. I have a track
    > pump at home and a pump on my bicycle, so I can think of no reason to
    > go into the place no cager can exist without if I am a la velo.
    >



    Depends what sort of place you live: out here in the sticks, the filling
    station is sometimes the only sort of shop which you'll find open after
    ten or eleven at night. I go to one by bike a few times a year, usually
    when I've forgotten to buy milk'n'eggs'n'that.

    Not that I'll be too bothered by this new development: the garage
    forecourt I have in mind has had long metal draincovers over the
    entrance for years, and I haven't fallen off yet.


    --
    Mark, UK
    "Education is the path from cocky ignorance to miserable uncertainty."
     
  10. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Phil Cook wrote:

    > Hmmm let me see. I can count on the thumbs of one hand the number of
    > times I have visited a filling station when not driving a car and have
    > never ever ridden into a filling station on a bicycle. I have a track
    > pump at home and a pump on my bicycle, so I can think of no reason to
    > go into the place no cager can exist without if I am a la velo.


    You might not use them in a middle of a bike ride but can you not imagine
    that other cyclists like to buy food and drink from them? And maybe the
    odd copy of Worm Breeders Digest?

    I find them quite pleasant places to visit and leave my bike outside
    compared to local shops--which are often closed, sandwich-free or
    non-existant anyway.

    ~PB
     
  11. "Pete Biggs" <[email protected]> wrote:
    | You might not use them in a middle of a bike ride but can you not imagine
    | that other cyclists like to buy food and drink from them? And maybe the
    | odd copy of Worm Breeders Digest?

    I thought the whole point was that the worms did the digesting,
    not their breeders. <http://www.wormdigest.org/>
     
  12. "Doki" <[email protected]>typed


    > I'll remember next time I take my bike into a petrol station. I can only
    > ever remember doing it once...


    They can be very useful night controls on Audax rides...

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
    Edgware.
     
  13. Paul - xxx

    Paul - xxx Guest

    Richard came up with the following;:
    > Paul - xxx wrote:
    >> Richard came up with the following;:
    >>
    >>> ...to skid on in wet weather:

    >>
    >>
    >>> I'm more than half inclined to suspect that the spikes bit is a hoax,
    >>> given the extreme reticience of the site to show the system in action.
    >>> But even so, the metal plates look seriously unpleasant in wet weather.

    >>
    >>
    >> Did you even read the articles?
    >>
    >> They're plates on the forecourts, indeed next to the petrol pumps, of a
    >> garage that suffers from 'drive-aways'. Not, normally, somewhere you'd
    >> cycle.

    >
    > Not only did I read the article, I went to the website of the company
    > that sells them: If you'd done that, you would have
    > seen, in the photographs...


    wgaf? I don't visit petrol stations on my bike.

    > I suspect most cyclists will choose the more
    > conventional route - which will involve going over the plates.


    Why would cyclists be visiting a petrol station?

    --
    Paul ...
    (8(|) Homer Rules ..... Doh !!!
     
  14. "Paul - xxx" <[email protected]>typed

    > Why would cyclists be visiting a petrol station?


    As a check point on an Audax ride.

    As a source of food, coffee, ice-cream, liquorice allsorts, WD40,
    puncture kits[1] you name it!

    [1] I bought one at a garage once. Both tyres had deflated when I hit a
    brick at speed, so I had my first punctures in 15 months within about
    1/10 second of each other. I was on a commute between hospitals and only
    had one spare inner tube.

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
    Edgware.
     
  15. Richard

    Richard Guest

    Paul - xxx wrote:
    > Why would cyclists be visiting a petrol station?


    Food and drink, cyclists being more in need of those than motorists.

    I've occasionally bought a newspaper there, too, and once I managed to
    find a small gas torch that I'd been looking for, for a couple of quid
    (but to be fair, I didn't go in there just to look for it).

    I believe the Audax folk buy things in them just to prove (by the
    receipt) they've been there at a certain time.

    Just because /you/ have no concept of why cyclists might want to visit a
    petrol station doesn't mean that they don't.

    R.
     
  16. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Helen Deborah Vecht wrote:
    >
    > As a source of food, coffee, ice-cream, liquorice allsorts, WD40,
    > puncture kits[1] you name it!
    >
    > [1] I bought one at a garage once. Both tyres had deflated when I hit a
    > brick at speed, so I had my first punctures in 15 months within about
    > 1/10 second of each other. I was on a commute between hospitals and only
    > had one spare inner tube.
    >


    So if the tyre spikes get you you can repair the punctures ;-)

    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  17. Pyromancer

    Pyromancer Guest

    Upon the miasma of midnight, a darkling spirit identified as Richard
    <[email protected]> gently breathed:

    >Not only did I read the article, I went to the website of the company
    >that sells them: www.drivestop.com. If you'd done that, you would
    >have seen, in the photographs...
    >
    >http://www.drivestop.com/full/enter_0.jpg
    >http://www.drivestop.com/full/exit_0.jpg
    >
    >...that the plates go across the entrance and exit to the petrol
    >station, not beside the pumps at all. You may be in the habit of
    >flying into petrol stations on your bike, or possibly tunnelling up
    >onto the forecourt, but I suspect most cyclists will choose the more
    >conventional route - which will involve going over the plates.


    They're not exactly enormous, can't be more than a few inches across.
    Given that entering a petrol station usually involves crossing the
    pavement which means a change of surface and the possibility of giving
    way to pedestrians, and hence should be done cautiously and at low
    speed, what's the problem?

    --
    - DJ Pyromancer, The Sunday Goth Social, Leeds. <http://www.sheepish.net>

    Broadband, Dialup, Domains = <http://www.wytches.net> = The UK's Pagan ISP!
    <http://www.inkubus-sukkubus.co.uk> <http://www.revival.stormshadow.com>
     
  18. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Pyromancer wrote:

    >
    > They're not exactly enormous, can't be more than a few inches across.
    > Given that entering a petrol station usually involves crossing the
    > pavement which means a change of surface and the possibility of giving
    > way to pedestrians, and hence should be done cautiously and at low
    > speed, what's the problem?
    >


    No worse than cattle grids and IME garage forecourts have lots of metal
    plates anyway presumably covering tanks etc.

    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  19. Richard

    Richard Guest

    Pyromancer wrote:

    > They're not exactly enormous, can't be more than a few inches across.
    > Given that entering a petrol station usually involves crossing the
    > pavement which means a change of surface and the possibility of giving
    > way to pedestrians, and hence should be done cautiously and at low
    > speed, what's the problem?


    There speaks a man who's never lost the front wheel on slick wet metal ;-)

    The presence of pedestrians is a straw man.

    The problem is that cyclists are likely to be crossing these surfaces at
    a shallow angle; that, not being on the public highway, there aren't
    AFAIK any regulations governing how well they are installed (so,
    although the photographs depict the demonstration location plates neatly
    flush with the surface, they may well end up being raised or sunken
    slightly (and as anyone's ever come a cropper on tram tracks will tell
    you, this is potentially lethal).

    R.
     
  20. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Richard wrote:
    > Pyromancer wrote:
    >
    >> They're not exactly enormous, can't be more than a few inches across.
    >> Given that entering a petrol station usually involves crossing the
    >> pavement which means a change of surface and the possibility of
    >> giving way to pedestrians, and hence should be done cautiously and
    >> at low speed, what's the problem?

    >
    > There speaks a man who's never lost the front wheel on slick wet
    > metal ;-)
    >
    > The presence of pedestrians is a straw man.


    Pedestrians = low speed = ability to cross hazards at a square angle.

    Non need to zoom into a petrol station at your normal road speed.

    ~PB
     
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