more gripes: chlorine

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by [email protected], Apr 9, 2006.

  1. Now I found out that this stuff can make your teeth yellow (by any
    chance because it's chemically similar to fluorine, which teeth
    absorb?) and other annoying things. Does it affect me if I swim about
    45 min/day? Ask the district council to change pools to ozone?

    Seb
     
    Tags:


  2. Chris Zakelj

    Chris Zakelj Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Now I found out that this stuff can make your teeth yellow (by any
    > chance because it's chemically similar to fluorine, which teeth
    > absorb?) and other annoying things. Does it affect me if I swim about
    > 45 min/day? Ask the district council to change pools to ozone?


    Not enough to worry. Many of us swim twice as long, with no ill
    effects. If you're that worried, you can always swish around some fresh
    water between sets to keep the chlorine from setting in. Personally, I
    think it's more likely we'd be getting bleached than yellowed, but don't
    have the chemistry/biology knowledge to be sure.
     
  3. Steve Curtis

    Steve Curtis Guest

    "Seb" wrote:

    >Now I found out that this stuff can make
    >your teeth yellow (by any chance
    >because it's chemically similar to
    >fluorine, which teeth absorb?) and other
    >annoying things. Does it affect me if I
    >swim about 45 min/day? Ask the district
    >council to change pools to ozone?


    My dentist has mentioned this to me as being a problem with frequent
    swimmers.

    Found this with some explanation:

    http://www.deltadentalins.com/health/swimming.html
     
  4. <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Now I found out that this stuff can make your teeth yellow (by any
    > chance because it's chemically similar to fluorine, which teeth
    > absorb?) and other annoying things. Does it affect me if I swim about
    > 45 min/day? Ask the district council to change pools to ozone?
    >
    > Seb
    >


    Coule be too much chlorine. When I was about 8
    or 9, I went to a pool party, and they put so much
    chlorine in the water, it bleach my swimming trunks.
    Askthem how much they are putting in.
     
  5. Pat in TX

    Pat in TX Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Now I found out that this stuff can make your teeth yellow (by any
    > chance because it's chemically similar to fluorine, which teeth
    > absorb?) and other annoying things. Does it affect me if I swim about
    > 45 min/day? Ask the district council to change pools to ozone?
    >
    > Seb


    My local pool has changed to a salt water system. I don't know how expensive
    it is vis a vis using straight chlorine, but it is a lot nicer to swim in.

    Pat
    >
     
  6. Madelaine

    Madelaine Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Now I found out that this stuff can make your teeth yellow (by any
    > chance because it's chemically similar to fluorine, which teeth
    > absorb?) and other annoying things. Does it affect me if I swim about
    > 45 min/day? Ask the district council to change pools to ozone?
    >
    > Seb
    >

    There shouldn't be much, if any, water with cholrine getting in your
    mouth when you swim. You should be blowing air out of your mouth as you
    swim. There are a lot of products to whiten your teeth if they should
    get yellow from swimming. Note the lack of yellow teeth among famous
    swimmers.
    Madelaine
     
  7. Since one of the links given says that the yellowing can be fixed by a
    dentist (if it ever happens to me at all), even less to worry. At the
    risk of taking this OT: I haven't visited a dentist for nearly 2 years,
    contrary to advice to get your teeth checked and cleaned professionally
    once or twice a year (no dental problems at all so far). I wonder if
    it's a coincidence that dentists tell you to get your teeth checked
    often...

    Seb
     
  8. Pat in TX wrote:
    >
    > My local pool has changed to a salt water system. I don't know how expensive
    > it is vis a vis using straight chlorine, but it is a lot nicer to swim in.
    >
    > Pat
    > >


    I have to disagree. The only thing good about salt chloring generators
    is safety. Nothing beats chlorine gas for clarity and water quality.
     
  9. Pat in TX

    Pat in TX Guest


    >>
    >> My local pool has changed to a salt water system. I don't know how
    >> expensive
    >> it is vis a vis using straight chlorine, but it is a lot nicer to swim
    >> in.
    >>
    >> Pat
    >> >

    >
    > I have to disagree. The only thing good about salt chloring generators
    > is safety. Nothing beats chlorine gas for clarity and water quality.


    I don't know how much experience you have had with the salt water system,
    but so far, my experience has been positive and much, much nicer than the
    chlorine pool in which to swim. But then, I liked the bromine system better
    than chlorine, too. Both of those systems were easier on the skin and eyes.

    Pat in TX
    >
     
  10. Chris Zakelj

    Chris Zakelj Guest

    Steve Curtis wrote:

    > My dentist has mentioned this to me as being a problem with frequent
    > swimmers.
    >
    > Found this with some explanation:
    >
    > http://www.deltadentalins.com/health/swimming.html


    I call shenanigans. That article implies six hours a week is enough to
    cause problems. I *KNOW* I spent at least twice that during my high
    school years, in an NaOCl (liquid chlorine) pool, and never saw anything
    that looked even remotely like this "calculus." The article also states
    that those chemicals also give the pool a higher pH than saliva. Again,
    I call them out. Every pool I've been to tries to maintain a pH of 7.4,
    which coincidentally, matches that of just about all your body's fluids,
    including that of a healthy adult's saliva.

    Now mind you, I'm not telling you to skip going to the dentist just
    because you swim. Far from it. Just don't go looking for problems
    where they likely don't exist.
     
  11. Madelaine

    Madelaine Guest

    Chris Zakelj wrote:
    > Steve Curtis wrote:
    >
    >
    >>My dentist has mentioned this to me as being a problem with frequent
    >>swimmers.
    >>
    >>Found this with some explanation:
    >>
    >>http://www.deltadentalins.com/health/swimming.html

    >
    >
    > I call shenanigans. That article implies six hours a week is enough to
    > cause problems. I *KNOW* I spent at least twice that during my high
    > school years, in an NaOCl (liquid chlorine) pool, and never saw anything
    > that looked even remotely like this "calculus." The article also states
    > that those chemicals also give the pool a higher pH than saliva. Again,
    > I call them out. Every pool I've been to tries to maintain a pH of 7.4,
    > which coincidentally, matches that of just about all your body's fluids,
    > including that of a healthy adult's saliva.
    >
    > Now mind you, I'm not telling you to skip going to the dentist just
    > because you swim. Far from it. Just don't go looking for problems
    > where they likely don't exist.

    Yes, and who are these people who swim with their mouths open? I don't
    think my teeth get as much exposure to pool water as they do to air in
    my office. If you are wimming 6 hours per week, you are probably doing
    proper rhythmic breathing.
    Madelaine
     
  12. Ross Bogue

    Ross Bogue Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Madelaine <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Yes, and who are these people who swim with their mouths open? I don't
    > think my teeth get as much exposure to pool water as they do to air in
    > my office. If you are wimming 6 hours per week, you are probably doing
    > proper rhythmic breathing.



    I think I drank enough pool water during my fly sets today to qualify.

    That's KICK-pull-kick-gulp, KICK-pull-kick-gulp, ...



    Ross
     
  13. Martin Smith

    Martin Smith Guest

    Madelaine wrote:
    > Chris Zakelj wrote:
    >
    >> Steve Curtis wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> My dentist has mentioned this to me as being a problem with frequent
    >>> swimmers.
    >>> Found this with some explanation:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.deltadentalins.com/health/swimming.html

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> I call shenanigans. That article implies six hours a week is enough to
    >> cause problems. I *KNOW* I spent at least twice that during my high
    >> school years, in an NaOCl (liquid chlorine) pool, and never saw anything
    >> that looked even remotely like this "calculus." The article also states
    >> that those chemicals also give the pool a higher pH than saliva. Again,
    >> I call them out. Every pool I've been to tries to maintain a pH of 7.4,
    >> which coincidentally, matches that of just about all your body's fluids,
    >> including that of a healthy adult's saliva.
    >>
    >> Now mind you, I'm not telling you to skip going to the dentist just
    >> because you swim. Far from it. Just don't go looking for problems
    >> where they likely don't exist.

    >
    > Yes, and who are these people who swim with their mouths open? I don't
    > think my teeth get as much exposure to pool water as they do to air in
    > my office. If you are wimming 6 hours per week, you are probably doing
    > proper rhythmic breathing.
    > Madelaine


    Not to mention the fact that people who don't swim also have yellow teeth.
     
  14. Michael Edey

    Michael Edey Guest

    On Wed, 12 Apr 2006 15:04:10 -0400, Madelaine wrote:

    <snip>

    >> Now mind you, I'm not telling you to skip going to the dentist just
    >> because you swim. Far from it. Just don't go looking for problems
    >> where they likely don't exist.

    > Yes, and who are these people who swim with their mouths open? I don't
    > think my teeth get as much exposure to pool water as they do to air in
    > my office. If you are wimming 6 hours per week, you are probably doing
    > proper rhythmic breathing.
    > Madelaine


    Something to keep in mind.... Cl doesn't stay in solution terribly well.
    In a pool with substandard ventilation it's likely that most of your
    chlorine exposure will come not via the water but from the air sitting
    less than a meter above it.

    I swam in a local pool that, strangely, was first owned by the federal
    government, than passe don to the province. Now neither the province nor
    the city wants it so it looks like it's going to be mothballed.
    Incidentally mothballing the swim team as well. Apparently Albertans like
    their water frozen. This facility was built as part of a long term mental
    institution (think Downs, not plea bargain) in the 60s. So it's over
    chlorinated to begin with and not well ventilated. We pushed for a long
    time to get an environmental assessment as our age group team had an
    astronomical level of asthma problems and several of us, myself included,
    problems with the dentist.

    --Mike
     
  15. Chris Zakelj

    Chris Zakelj Guest

    Michael Edey wrote:

    > Something to keep in mind.... Cl doesn't stay in solution terribly well.
    > In a pool with substandard ventilation it's likely that most of your
    > chlorine exposure will come not via the water but from the air sitting
    > less than a meter above it.
    >
    > I swam in a local pool that, strangely, was first owned by the federal
    > government, than passe don to the province. Now neither the province nor
    > the city wants it so it looks like it's going to be mothballed.
    > Incidentally mothballing the swim team as well. Apparently Albertans like
    > their water frozen. This facility was built as part of a long term mental
    > institution (think Downs, not plea bargain) in the 60s. So it's over
    > chlorinated to begin with and not well ventilated. We pushed for a long
    > time to get an environmental assessment as our age group team had an
    > astronomical level of asthma problems and several of us, myself included,
    > problems with the dentist.


    We had similar chlorine-induced breathing problems at the pool where my
    HS team swam, as it was built in the early '90s when the whole "recycle
    the heat" craze was in full swing, but no dental complaints as chlorine
    levels were always kept between 1 and 3 ppm. Perhaps the chloramine
    levels play a larger role that wasn't explored by this author, as an
    overchlorinated (but not break-point) pool would have an excessive
    amount of those just waiting to attack something.
     
  16. Martin Smith

    Martin Smith Guest

    Chris Zakelj <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Michael Edey wrote:
    >
    >> Something to keep in mind.... Cl doesn't stay in solution terribly well.
    >> In a pool with substandard ventilation it's likely that most of your
    >> chlorine exposure will come not via the water but from the air sitting
    >> less than a meter above it.
    >>
    >> I swam in a local pool that, strangely, was first owned by the federal
    >> government, than passe don to the province. Now neither the province nor
    >> the city wants it so it looks like it's going to be mothballed.
    >> Incidentally mothballing the swim team as well. Apparently Albertans like
    >> their water frozen. This facility was built as part of a long term mental
    >> institution (think Downs, not plea bargain) in the 60s. So it's over
    >> chlorinated to begin with and not well ventilated. We pushed for a long
    >> time to get an environmental assessment as our age group team had an
    >> astronomical level of asthma problems and several of us, myself included,
    >> problems with the dentist.

    >
    >We had similar chlorine-induced breathing problems at the pool where my
    >HS team swam, as it was built in the early '90s when the whole "recycle
    >the heat" craze was in full swing, but no dental complaints as chlorine
    >levels were always kept between 1 and 3 ppm. Perhaps the chloramine
    >levels play a larger role that wasn't explored by this author, as an
    >overchlorinated (but not break-point) pool would have an excessive
    >amount of those just waiting to attack something.


    I think you would feel it in your throat and lungs before it
    coulddamage your teeth.
     
  17. Chris Zakelj

    Chris Zakelj Guest

    Martin Smith wrote:
    > Chris Zakelj <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Michael Edey wrote:
    >>
    >>> Something to keep in mind.... Cl doesn't stay in solution terribly well.
    >>> In a pool with substandard ventilation it's likely that most of your
    >>> chlorine exposure will come not via the water but from the air sitting
    >>> less than a meter above it.
    >>>
    >>> I swam in a local pool that, strangely, was first owned by the federal
    >>> government, than passe don to the province. Now neither the province nor
    >>> the city wants it so it looks like it's going to be mothballed.
    >>> Incidentally mothballing the swim team as well. Apparently Albertans like
    >>> their water frozen. This facility was built as part of a long term mental
    >>> institution (think Downs, not plea bargain) in the 60s. So it's over
    >>> chlorinated to begin with and not well ventilated. We pushed for a long
    >>> time to get an environmental assessment as our age group team had an
    >>> astronomical level of asthma problems and several of us, myself included,
    >>> problems with the dentist.

    >> We had similar chlorine-induced breathing problems at the pool where my
    >> HS team swam, as it was built in the early '90s when the whole "recycle
    >> the heat" craze was in full swing, but no dental complaints as chlorine
    >> levels were always kept between 1 and 3 ppm. Perhaps the chloramine
    >> levels play a larger role that wasn't explored by this author, as an
    >> overchlorinated (but not break-point) pool would have an excessive
    >> amount of those just waiting to attack something.

    >
    > I think you would feel it in your throat and lungs before it
    > could damage your teeth.


    Agreed. Apparently someone somewhere had trouble, would be nice to have
    an actual study on how/why it happened, and what the mechanisms involved
    were.
     
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