More on SRAM's new road group

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by D'ohBoy, Apr 6, 2006.



  1. Diablo Scott

    Diablo Scott Guest

  2. Diablo Scott wrote:
    > D'ohBoy wrote:
    > > http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech.php?id=tech/2006/features/sram_road_launch
    > >
    > > Hmmm....
    > >
    > > D'ohBoy
    > >

    > "the new OpenGlide technology removes complete teeth from smaller cogs
    > in order to speed up shifts,"
    >
    >
    > So what do you call the 12t sprocket if it only has 8 teeth?


    Dunno, but I'm less than convinced by the DoubleTap system's way of
    down-shifting - seems fiddly and liable to encourage gear selection
    mistakes at crucial points in races, especially if you're more used to
    something like Ergopower.
    Interesting to see that for one of the groupsets they've revived the
    "Rival" name (used by Sachs-Huret in the '90s, not long before SRAM
    took them over)!

    David Belcher
     
  3. Doug Taylor

    Doug Taylor Guest

  4. Hank Wirtz

    Hank Wirtz Guest

  5. Doug Taylor wrote:
    > On 6 Apr 2006 05:23:28 -0700, "D'ohBoy" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >http://www.cyclingnews.com/tech.php?id=tech/2006/features/sram_road_launch

    >
    > As a compact ring advocate, I'm happy to see the following compact
    > friendly features:
    >
    > a) choice of 50/34 or 50/36;
    > b) front der. works for traditional and compact rings;
    > c) 11-26 cassette.
    >
    > And, whether you buy the whole group or not, 10 speed Shimano users
    > can now buy a good chain with a powerlink. Yay.


    10sp Powerlink chain for DA is a big plus. Not sure on the cassette
    spacing, but a 11-26 is an interesting option for some hilly Road
    Races.

    Anybody hear any price points? I imagine it'll be a little less than
    DA to gain a solid user base?
     
  6. Hank Wirtz

    Hank Wirtz Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > Interesting to see that for one of the groupsets they've revived the
    > "Rival" name (used by Sachs-Huret in the '90s, not long before SRAM
    > took them over)!
    >


    The name's much older than that, at least since the early '80s, maybe even
    older.
     
  7. Doug Taylor

    Doug Taylor Guest

    On 6 Apr 2006 10:55:29 -0700, "Andrew F Martin"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >10sp Powerlink chain for DA is a big plus. Not sure on the cassette
    >spacing, but a 11-26 is an interesting option for some hilly Road
    >Races.


    I believe the 11-26 is intended for compact cranks, and anybody who
    races with compact I think by definition is on a really hilly course
    and/or is a really small female or a really old Master. The 11 is so
    you don't lose your high gear with the compact 50 tooth big ring. As
    "purists" in this n.g have pointed out, the rest of these compact
    blocks which start with an 11 and end with 26, 27 or 28 necessarily
    have more than one 2 tooth jumps in various spots and therefore aren't
    favored as racing cassettes in flatter terrain.
     
  8. I liked the 12-25 for my 9sp groups on hilly races. When 10sp came out
    - it seemed logical to give me a 11-25, but Shimano didn't do that. I
    use the 11 more than one might think and there are a bunch of coarses
    I'd prefer using the 53-23 (an in a cross-chain pinch 53-25) than the
    39 tooth equivalent.
     
  9. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    On Thu, 06 Apr 2006 15:30:33 -0400, Doug Taylor wrote:

    > On 6 Apr 2006 10:55:29 -0700, "Andrew F Martin"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>10sp Powerlink chain for DA is a big plus. Not sure on the cassette
    >>spacing, but a 11-26 is an interesting option for some hilly Road
    >>Races.

    >
    > I believe the 11-26 is intended for compact cranks, and anybody who
    > races with compact I think by definition is on a really hilly course
    > and/or is a really small female or a really old Master. The 11 is so
    > you don't lose your high gear with the compact 50 tooth big ring. As
    > "purists" in this n.g have pointed out, the rest of these compact
    > blocks which start with an 11 and end with 26, 27 or 28 necessarily
    > have more than one 2 tooth jumps in various spots and therefore aren't
    > favored as racing cassettes in flatter terrain.


    There aren't too many riders, even Cat II racers, who can spin out a 50/12.

    Matt O.
     
  10. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    On Thu, 06 Apr 2006 08:49:45 -0700, deb107_york wrote:

    > Dunno, but I'm less than convinced by the DoubleTap system's way of
    > down-shifting - seems fiddly and liable to encourage gear selection
    > mistakes at crucial points in races, especially if you're more used to
    > something like Ergopower.


    It seems that way to me too, but I'll reserve judgement until I try it.

    Matt O.
     
  11. Matt O'Toole wrote:
    > On Thu, 06 Apr 2006 15:30:33 -0400, Doug Taylor wrote:
    >
    > > On 6 Apr 2006 10:55:29 -0700, "Andrew F Martin"
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >>10sp Powerlink chain for DA is a big plus. Not sure on the cassette
    > >>spacing, but a 11-26 is an interesting option for some hilly Road
    > >>Races.

    > >
    > > I believe the 11-26 is intended for compact cranks, and anybody who
    > > races with compact I think by definition is on a really hilly course
    > > and/or is a really small female or a really old Master. The 11 is so
    > > you don't lose your high gear with the compact 50 tooth big ring. As
    > > "purists" in this n.g have pointed out, the rest of these compact
    > > blocks which start with an 11 and end with 26, 27 or 28 necessarily
    > > have more than one 2 tooth jumps in various spots and therefore aren't
    > > favored as racing cassettes in flatter terrain.

    >
    > There aren't too many riders, even Cat II racers, who can spin out a 50/12.
    >
    >


    Hope springs eternal......
     
  12. On Thu, 06 Apr 2006 17:32:25 -0400, Matt O'Toole
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >There aren't too many riders, even Cat II racers, who can spin out a 50/12.


    On the flat, in still air? No. But that's not the point of big gears.
    Shallow downhills, tailwinds, closing gaps when tired, etc. Necesarry
    to stay in the field at certain points.

    JT

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  13. I don't get the argument against the 11. I did a sprint workout last
    week where I spun out the 53-12 a number of times (tailwind to simulate
    race conditions from about 30mph). People who argue the math angle
    must just lack the real world experience. There's been a number of
    races that I started with the 12-25 where I find myself shifting for
    the 11 that's unfortunately at home on my 11-23 wheel.
     
  14. I'm very in-patiently awaiting my new rain bike so I can get back to
    consistent shifting methods. It seems stupid, but when you ride Ergo
    all winter, then swap over to STI for the race bike - it's not an
    automatic transition. Then I go and ride the rain bike during the week
    - my hands sometimes get confused as to what they are doing.
     
  15. On Thu, 06 Apr 2006 15:30:33 -0400, Doug Taylor
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I believe the 11-26 is intended for compact cranks, and anybody who
    >races with compact I think by definition is on a really hilly course
    >and/or is a really small female or a really old Master.


    Some mid-level normal size women racers where I live use compact
    cranks. And one good not so old master I know - got second in a
    stage of GMSR with a compact crank as a 30+ a few years ago but I
    think he's 41 now.

    JT

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  16. RonSonic

    RonSonic Guest

  17. Ron Ruff

    Ron Ruff Guest

    Andrew F Martin wrote:
    > I don't get the argument against the 11. I did a sprint workout last
    > week where I spun out the 53-12 a number of times (tailwind to simulate
    > race conditions from about 30mph). People who argue the math angle
    > must just lack the real world experience. There's been a number of
    > races that I started with the 12-25 where I find myself shifting for
    > the 11 that's unfortunately at home on my 11-23 wheel.


    I'm not racing at the moment, but I used to do fine with a high gear of
    52/13. Sprints up to 40mph were done in the 14 or 15. The only time I
    wished for a higher gear was during a very windy (40mph) flat circuit
    race at Casper.

    Others may have a different preference, but generally speaking if 53/11
    is good enough for Boonan et al, then most of us should be fine with a
    lower gear. For me at least high efforts are best done at high rpm...
    especially if acceleration is involved.
     
  18. Fair enough - don't want to start the 11/12/13 thing again. I'm just
    going to remain confortable racing with the 11 and maybe pick up a
    11-26 when they come out.
     
  19. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    On Thu, 06 Apr 2006 19:36:26 -0400, John Forrest Tomlinson wrote:

    > On Thu, 06 Apr 2006 15:30:33 -0400, Doug Taylor <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>I believe the 11-26 is intended for compact cranks, and anybody who
    >>races with compact I think by definition is on a really hilly course
    >>and/or is a really small female or a really old Master.

    >
    > Some mid-level normal size women racers where I live use compact cranks.
    > And one good not so old master I know - got second in a stage of GMSR
    > with a compact crank as a 30+ a few years ago but I think he's 41 now.


    Plenty of fit/fast racers use the lower gears offered by compacts and
    triples. The problem with a compact for racing is that it requires too
    many double shifts in the middle of the "normal" speed range. I actually
    prefer my triple because its 42T middle ring covers my normal speed range
    without as many double shifts as the usual double with a 39T. Also the
    gap is narrower, making front shifts almost as seamless as rear ones.

    Matt O.
     
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