More $ to build Cross Check than to buy complete

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Gooserider, Dec 11, 2005.

  1. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    I'm going to build a Cross-Check as a single speed, so I was checking prices
    and making a list. I see the bike complete is about $1000. I was over that
    by a bunch getting parts on my own. If Surly can sell it complete so cheap
    with gears why don't they put together a cheapo SS build? They would make a
    killing if they could bring it in at $750 or less.
     
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  2. Cully_J

    Cully_J Guest

    "Gooserider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'm going to build a Cross-Check as a single speed, so I was checking

    prices
    > and making a list. I see the bike complete is about $1000. I was over that
    > by a bunch getting parts on my own. If Surly can sell it complete so cheap
    > with gears why don't they put together a cheapo SS build? They would make

    a
    > killing if they could bring it in at $750 or less.


    Or you could be punk about it and do as I did. Go to the thrift store and
    buy an EL CHEAPO bike. Something with horizontal dropouts...If you can find
    it.

    But Surlies are cool too.

    Cully_J
     
  3. maxo

    maxo Guest

    Unless you're going to actually go off road and ride cx with it--and
    it's gonna be used for urban riding: check out the Redline 9*2*5 or
    Bianchi San Jose instead--both moderate priced single speeds that are
    already built up.

    I agree with the 2nd poster--it's usually economically smarter to build
    up a single from a junked ride. Even if you build up new wheels, you'll
    have a hard time going over $300 if you shop smart.

    This frame from Urbane Cycles will run under $300USD and is a single
    with room for fenders:

    http://ucycle.com/bikes/item.php?name=urbsingle&cat=urbanite

    Worth a look. ;)
     
  4. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "maxo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Unless you're going to actually go off road and ride cx with it--and
    > it's gonna be used for urban riding: check out the Redline 9*2*5 or
    > Bianchi San Jose instead--both moderate priced single speeds that are
    > already built up.


    I looked at both but I want a bike with horizontal dropouts, not track ends.
    The San Jose seems like an awfully nice package, especially at it's price
    point.

    > I agree with the 2nd poster--it's usually economically smarter to build
    > up a single from a junked ride. Even if you build up new wheels, you'll
    > have a hard time going over $300 if you shop smart.
    >
    > This frame from Urbane Cycles will run under $300USD and is a single
    > with room for fenders:
    >
    > http://ucycle.com/bikes/item.php?name=urbsingle&cat=urbanite
    >
    > Worth a look. ;)


    Nice frame but I don't see fender eyelets on the fork, just on the frame.
     
  5. maxo

    maxo Guest

    All the cool kids are zipping it:
    http://static.flickr.com/24/63979138_d03ba8c4b8_o.jpg

    My bike's got eyelets back but none up front--a pretty stupid, but
    surmountable obstacle to fenderage. :p Still begs the question why?

    Why do you want horizontal drops? Only reason I could think of would be
    if you ran flip flop and wanted to run a rear brake.
     
  6. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    On 11 Dec 2005 13:11:45 -0800, "maxo" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Why do you want horizontal drops? Only reason I could think of would be
    >if you ran flip flop and wanted to run a rear brake.


    It's harder removing the rear wheel when you've got fender stays
    attached to the standard track and BMX type fork ends because the
    wheel must be pulled back to be removed. With good old horizontal
    dropouts, it's pushed forward so the fender doesn't get in the way.
    --
    zk
     
  7. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Zoot Katz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 11 Dec 2005 13:11:45 -0800, "maxo" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Why do you want horizontal drops? Only reason I could think of would be
    >>if you ran flip flop and wanted to run a rear brake.

    >
    > It's harder removing the rear wheel when you've got fender stays
    > attached to the standard track and BMX type fork ends because the
    > wheel must be pulled back to be removed. With good old horizontal
    > dropouts, it's pushed forward so the fender doesn't get in the way.
    > --
    > zk


    I hadn't thought of that, but thanks, Zoot.
     
  8. maxo

    maxo Guest

    Aha, makes perfect sense! I've never had a single with both track drops
    and fenders so would never have thunk it.

    Removing my rear wheel compressing the tire against the back of the
    fender or deflating. A close, but handsome fit. :p
     
  9. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    On 11 Dec 2005 21:34:46 -0800, "maxo" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Aha, makes perfect sense! I've never had a single with both track drops
    >and fenders so would never have thunk it.
    >

    I scrounged a Korean made ladies SS city bike with a drum brake. The
    rear axle holds the fender stays and swing stand too. Add in the full
    metal chain guard and I can understand developing the technique for
    patching a tube without removing the wheel. . . I just can stand it.

    >Removing my rear wheel compressing the tire against the back of the
    >fender or deflating. A close, but handsome fit. :p


    Decent length chain stays make the difference.
    If you don't want to hassle with deflating, or if you forget and
    pumped up the repaired tire before offering it into the frame one too
    many times (don't ask), a grinder or file can abbreviate some
    dropouts.

    Some are already plenty short. They seemed to appear along with tight
    rear clearances but before vertical dropouts. If you're going to hack
    'em, you might as well take off the derailleur hanger too.
    --
    zk
     
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