Most Comfortable Bike

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by PJ, Aug 2, 2004.

  1. PJ

    PJ Guest

    After getting reaquainted with cycling by riding a recumbent for the
    last few years, I am looking at purchasing a diamond frame bike to
    complement my recumbent. Coming from a very comfortable recumbent, I
    am looking for a bike that is very comfortable to ride for longer
    rides (100-200 miles per day)and am looking at the Co-Motion NorWester
    which seems to be a good balanced bike, with a relatively short top
    tube,and long chainstays which appeal to me because I have long legs
    and a short torso . I will not be doing any fully loaded touring nor
    racing but want a good performing versatile bike. Any comments on the
    Co-Motion or suggestions at other bikes to look at?

    Paul
     
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  2. Mike Causer

    Mike Causer Guest

    On Mon, 02 Aug 2004 11:27:11 -0700, PJ wrote:

    > After getting reaquainted with cycling by riding a recumbent for the
    > last few years, I am looking at purchasing a diamond frame bike to
    > complement my recumbent.


    I find that the suspension on my Moulton(s) goes some way to catching up
    to the comfort of an unsuspended SWB 'bent (Speed Ross). The Ross and
    the Moulton are both comfortable under different circumstances, but for
    long rides give me a bent every time! If you want to try a non-diamond
    upright built for long distances a Moulton in AM, NS or APB guise is
    worth a look. (Sadly there isn't a dealer on every intersection, but
    neither is there a 'bent dealer, so presumably you can live with this.)

    Mike
     
  3. rocketman58

    rocketman58 Guest

    [email protected] (PJ) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > After getting reaquainted with cycling by riding a recumbent for the
    > last few years, I am looking at purchasing a diamond frame bike to
    > complement my recumbent. Coming from a very comfortable recumbent, I
    > am looking for a bike that is very comfortable to ride for longer
    > rides (100-200 miles per day)and am looking at the Co-Motion NorWester
    > which seems to be a good balanced bike, with a relatively short top
    > tube,and long chainstays which appeal to me because I have long legs
    > and a short torso . I will not be doing any fully loaded touring nor
    > racing but want a good performing versatile bike. Any comments on the
    > Co-Motion or suggestions at other bikes to look at?
    >
    > Paul



    After having spent a few years riding recumbents I too decided to go
    back to a Diamond frame road bike. I found a comfortable steel frame
    with relaxed geometry, a carbon fork, and wider tires. After a couple
    of months, and a number of 30 to 50 mile rides, I realized that I
    could never be satisfied with even a "comfortable" standard Diamond
    frame road bike again. By road bike standards, my bike was very
    plush. By Recumbent standards, it was torture.

    I still ride a mountainbike off road and for short (under 40 miles)
    road rides. It has a 4" travel fork and a 3" travel suspension post.
    With the suspension, I can ride comfortably off road and moderate road
    riding.

    To suppliment your recumbent, how about a mountainbike? For 100-200
    mile rides what's wrong with the recumbent? Long road rides is where
    a recumbent shines. I would never do another centrury ride on
    anything but a recumbent.
     
  4. Bruce Frech

    Bruce Frech Guest

    Find a bike that fits, and be sure to put the saddle far enough behind the
    cranks to spread your weight between your hands and butt. Check out the
    explanantion in this page on perineum tenderness as to positioning:
    http://www.cyclingnews.com/fitness/?id=2004/letters08-02#Penile

    Bruce

    "PJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > After getting reaquainted with cycling by riding a recumbent for the
    > last few years, I am looking at purchasing a diamond frame bike to
    > complement my recumbent. Coming from a very comfortable recumbent, I
    > am looking for a bike that is very comfortable to ride for longer
    > rides (100-200 miles per day)and am looking at the Co-Motion NorWester
    > which seems to be a good balanced bike, with a relatively short top
    > tube,and long chainstays which appeal to me because I have long legs
    > and a short torso . I will not be doing any fully loaded touring nor
    > racing but want a good performing versatile bike. Any comments on the
    > Co-Motion or suggestions at other bikes to look at?
    >
    > Paul
     
  5. Try a Rambouillet from Rivendell Bicycles. I also ride recumbents and
    purchased the Rambouillet. It is the most comfortable upright I've ever
    ridden.

    www.rivendellbicycles.com


    "PJ" <pj[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > After getting reaquainted with cycling by riding a recumbent for the
    > last few years, I am looking at purchasing a diamond frame bike to
    > complement my recumbent. Coming from a very comfortable recumbent, I
    > am looking for a bike that is very comfortable to ride for longer
    > rides (100-200 miles per day)and am looking at the Co-Motion NorWester
    > which seems to be a good balanced bike, with a relatively short top
    > tube,and long chainstays which appeal to me because I have long legs
    > and a short torso . I will not be doing any fully loaded touring nor
    > racing but want a good performing versatile bike. Any comments on the
    > Co-Motion or suggestions at other bikes to look at?
    >
    > Paul
     
  6. eflayer2

    eflayer2 Guest

    In my opinion nicer looking, but approximately the same form and
    function would be a Rambouillet from Rivendell. Another option might
    be Steve Rex of Sacramento, CA. He made me a gorgeous, custom
    designed to my body parts, fillet braised steel frame with Reynolds
    Ouzo Pro fork, custom painted in a color of my choice, for less than
    the MSRP of an off the rack CoMotion. I have been through no less
    than 6 frames in three years, and the Rex is da bomb. The other
    frames just did not fit as well as my Rex. Steve knows about long
    distance, comfort riding.


    [email protected] (PJ) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > After getting reaquainted with cycling by riding a recumbent for the
    > last few years, I am looking at purchasing a diamond frame bike to
    > complement my recumbent. Coming from a very comfortable recumbent, I
    > am looking for a bike that is very comfortable to ride for longer
    > rides (100-200 miles per day)and am looking at the Co-Motion NorWester
    > which seems to be a good balanced bike, with a relatively short top
    > tube,and long chainstays which appeal to me because I have long legs
    > and a short torso . I will not be doing any fully loaded touring nor
    > racing but want a good performing versatile bike. Any comments on the
    > Co-Motion or suggestions at other bikes to look at?
    >
    > Paul
     
  7. PJ

    PJ Guest

    [email protected] (eflayer2) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > In my opinion nicer looking, but approximately the same form and
    > function would be a Rambouillet from Rivendell. Another option might
    > be Steve Rex of Sacramento, CA. He made me a gorgeous, custom
    > designed to my body parts, fillet braised steel frame with Reynolds
    > Ouzo Pro fork, custom painted in a color of my choice, for less than
    > the MSRP of an off the rack CoMotion. I have been through no less
    > than 6 frames in three years, and the Rex is da bomb. The other
    > frames just did not fit as well as my Rex. Steve knows about long
    > distance, comfort riding.



    One of the other bikes that I have been looking at and will test ride
    is the Gunnar Sport. Pretty similar dimensions to the NorWester but
    at a much lower price tag. With 105 components it would come in at
    about $1500 and a bit more for Ultegra. Any feedback on Gunnar's? An
    additional question is what would be a good all-round (no pun
    intended) tire for this kind of bike at say a 28c?

    Paul
     
  8. sfcommuter

    sfcommuter New Member

    Joined:
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    best "all-around" 700x28 IMO: Rivendell/Panaracer Ruffy-Tuffy. Superb handling tire (stock on the aforementioned Rambouillet)
     
  9. Frank Knox

    Frank Knox Guest

    "PJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > [email protected] (eflayer2) wrote in message

    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > In my opinion nicer looking, but approximately the same form and
    > > function would be a Rambouillet from Rivendell. Another option might
    > > be Steve Rex of Sacramento, CA. He made me a gorgeous, custom
    > > designed to my body parts, fillet braised steel frame with Reynolds
    > > Ouzo Pro fork, custom painted in a color of my choice, for less than
    > > the MSRP of an off the rack CoMotion. I have been through no less
    > > than 6 frames in three years, and the Rex is da bomb. The other
    > > frames just did not fit as well as my Rex. Steve knows about long
    > > distance, comfort riding.

    >
    >
    > One of the other bikes that I have been looking at and will test ride
    > is the Gunnar Sport. Pretty similar dimensions to the NorWester but
    > at a much lower price tag. With 105 components it would come in at
    > about $1500 and a bit more for Ultegra. Any feedback on Gunnar's? An
    > additional question is what would be a good all-round (no pun
    > intended) tire for this kind of bike at say a 28c?
    >
    > Paul

    I have Rivendell Rolly-Polly 28c tires on my Waterford RS. I enjoy the
    comfort of both.
     
  10. PJ <[email protected]> wrote:
    >After getting reaquainted with cycling by riding a recumbent for the
    >last few years, I am looking at purchasing a diamond frame bike to
    >complement my recumbent. Coming from a very comfortable recumbent, I
    >am looking for a bike that is very comfortable to ride for longer
    >rides (100-200 miles per day)and am looking at the Co-Motion NorWester
    >which seems to be a good balanced bike, with a relatively short top
    >tube,and long chainstays which appeal to me because I have long legs
    >and a short torso . I will not be doing any fully loaded touring nor
    >racing but want a good performing versatile bike. Any comments on the
    >Co-Motion or suggestions at other bikes to look at?


    I own a NorWester with S&S couplers which I often drag along with
    me when I travel. I use it for exercise and light touring when away,
    for bad-weather riding at home, and for anything which requires carrying
    a bigger load than is convenient on a racing bike. The NorWester has the
    right braze-ons, mounting bolts and heel and toe clearances for fenders
    and racks, and sufficient space for bigger tires.

    The NorWester is a big, strong bike. At a lot of other bike companies it
    would probably be called a loaded touring frame but since Co-motion also
    sells a touring-extreme brute, the Americano, they call the NorWester
    something else. It's a bit on the heavy side (massive steel front fork,
    big rear triangle), and stiff and strong. For what I use it for (not much
    load) it handles comfortably and feels very stable. While I'm a fairly
    cautious descender I've ridden my NorWester at over 40 mph on downhills
    without shimmying or other scary stuff. Mine is equipped with a vanilla
    road bike Ultegra triple group, and I can report that with the longer
    chainstays the triple drive train shifts and runs a lot cleaner than
    has been my experience with it on racing geometry frames. I can't think
    of anything negative about the bike other than the fact that you need to
    have a fair amount of excess cash lying around to buy one.

    As for comfort, it seems to me there's a couple of separate aspects to
    this. With respect to the issue is how much road hash ends up at your
    hands and butt, while this is a strong, stiff frame which is unlikely
    to be real comfortable on 23 mm tires at high pressure, bigger tires
    at lower pressures are the best way to smooth this out independent of
    frame construction. The NorWester frame wants bigger tires. I use
    700x28c tires on mine, at 90 psi if I'm not carrying anything, and they
    make the bike ride smooth as silk.

    The other part of being comfortable, however, that being how well the
    bike fits you, is in my opinion a specific individual issue which isn't
    possible to generalize. You are correct that the NorWester has a short
    cockpit; not only is the top tube a bit short, but the slack seat tube
    angle makes me push my seat forward to get my knees where I like them
    with respect to the pedals, which puts me even closer to the steerer.
    While I don't mind this, and have no trouble doing significant mileage
    on the bike, I'd just note that I find my other bike, a Calfee, to be
    more to my liking in terms of geometry (in fact the latter seems to suit
    me better than any bike I've owned so far, something I wouldn't have
    expected to be the case but discovered after I happened to take a test
    ride). If I could only have one bike I'd keep the Co-motion, since it
    is useful for more stuff, but I really like riding the other bike.

    The Co-motion is a good, versatile bike, but if "Most Comfortable Bike"
    is your primary goal then you might keep an open mind about what might
    work best for you and actually ride as many bikes as you can before
    buying something. What you find most comfortable might surprise you.

    Dennis Ferguson
     
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