Most expensive bike upgrade you've purchased

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Uawadall, Jan 21, 2016.

  1. Uawadall

    Uawadall Well-Known Member

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    Some bike parts(most bike parts) are expensive. I'm looking at upgrading my wheels and a few other things and see many things that are double,triple, quadruple the 800 I've paid for my bike(used cannondale synapse Tiagra). I've given myself a 450 limit on wheel upgrades and don't plan any other non maintenance upgrades.

    1.Whats is the most you've paid for a bike upgrade?

    2.Did it give you and reasonable performance gain?

    3.Did you feel like you wasted your money?
     
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  2. Weatherby

    Weatherby Well-Known Member

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    Assos crono skinsuit was up there and it did give a performance advantage on time trials but overall not worth it because of how infrequently it gets worn/used.

    A powertap rear wheel was a bit more expensive and I would say knowing my power output makes the hub worth it because it allows me to titrate my power in hilly terrain and allows me to more accurately do my intervals.
     
  3. Bob Ross

    Bob Ross New Member

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    Not me, but I bought my wife an upgrade for her bike a couple years ago: Had her custom bike sent back to the builder to be retrofitted for internal electronic shifting. Cost was not insignificant -- more than 2X what OP paid for his entire bike -- but the reward was well worth it. Was not so much about "performance gain" as it was about Now She Can Ride Her Bike, whereas before she couldn't due due chronic pain in her hands that prevented mechanical shifters from working reliably.
     
  4. kcj

    kcj New Member

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    1. Stages power meter
    2. No, but it allows me to more effectively track my efforts and evaluate my training
    3. Nope, best investment so far
     
  5. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    I'm a cheapskate compared to most you guys, but when I bought my Lynskey I opted to go with a Enve 2.0 fork instead of the stock Lynskey fork, but with swap credit I only paid about an additional $229 for it.

    Benefits, I was concerned with a generic relabeled CF fork holding up under long term road pounding, probably unfounded, so I went with the 2.0 because it was rated to handle a 350 pound rider instead of the standard 240 pound rider even though I only weigh 170, I figured I would be better off with an over engineered fork for the attended purpose. I have ridden other bikes with CF forks and I have noticed this one seems to have the most surefooted feeling.
     
  6. Uawadall

    Uawadall Well-Known Member

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    I think when there is a medical concern, most of would pull the trigger if it can be afforded. Its pretty cool that she can ride more easily do to this advancement.

    I was considering looking into one but the cost kind of pushed me away from doing so. Many people say that this is one of the best training tools available.

    Is their really that much difference in feel compared to the aluminum one? I think my bike has a CF fork and my bike really absorbs shock well. I'm close to the 170 range as well, but I'm known to hit a pot hole or 2.....or 4....
     
  7. Bicycleman

    Bicycleman Well-Known Member

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    I just bought a $110 LED head and tail light combo when I do the brevets this summer. Does that qualify me? Everything you get these days that has Shimano or Campagnolo is expensive. Even chains are expensive. You can have all the latest and greatest bikes and gadgets, but the only thing that makes you ride faster and harder is the time you put into your training. My Lemond is a stiff frame bike. I feel every bump and washboard depression or raise in the road, but I get through them because I stand in the saddle and use that old mb technique. It works, and I don't need all the expensive gadgets to get it done. I also drive a pickup truck, not a Cadillac or the latest expensive sport car.
     
  8. Weatherby

    Weatherby Well-Known Member

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    My most expensive downgrade is a Woundup Touring fork to replace the Enve 2.0. The Enve is 350 grams and the Woundup is 650 grams but the Woundup will easily allow 32m tires and fenders whereas I have to get creative to run fenders and 28mm with the Enve. Plus, the Woundup has mounts built in for the fenders and "should" be a bit more comfortable. Not cheap but I should sell the Enve to offset the cost. The Woundup fork has an aluminum insert to the steerer tube and that accounts for a big piece of the extra weight. I was going to install it today but it is 5F in my garage. It can wait.
     
  9. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    AL fork? no the Lynskey came with a Lynskey cf fork which I doubt Lynskey made so it probably was a generic made CF fork then a decal was plastered on it. According to other Lynskey owners the Enve 2.0 does make a difference on how the bike handled and tracked. A friend of mine has a Motobecane TI bike that he took off the original no brand name CF fork and replaced it with a Enve 2.0 after riding my bike and he now claims it too handles and tracks better, I haven't rode his bike since he did the swap so I can't remark personally on it.
     
  10. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    A full Super Record kit for my Gios (cranks, pedals, bottom bracket, hubs, derailleurs, brake levers, brake calipers, shifters, derailleurs, and seat post), with a box of DT spokes, a pair of Ambrosio Montreal rims, and a Turbo saddle. The year was 1982, the source was Performance, and it cost me about $950. That was a lot of money back then.

    It was not a waste. I rode that rig for 25 years.
     
  11. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Campy doesn't wear out. It wears in.

    Those old Gios Torino in the dark blue/white panels were awesome crit bikes.
     
  12. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    What model Lemond do you have? I had a Lemond Tourmalet. aluminum frame I snapped on a climb. IT was replaced with a carb/alum mix Chambery. Loved the ride but it also snapped on a climb. The alum frame was a wimpy noodle. I was afraid to stand on the pedals as I could flex the frame with a seated effort. :eek:

    Both these frames snapped after 13,000 miles. I now have full carbon with about 11,000 so if I get over 13,000 I'll be impressed with carbon. :D

    Tourmalet snapped on Baldy Rd.

    [​IMG]

    Snapped on Glendora Mtn Rd.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    I think that's the worst BB area failure I've seen in 45 years of cycling. Yikes!

    RR dropout failures/chainstay failures are fairly common. I've cracked a carbon Wilier Izoard XP across the chainstay...probably right at the dropout-tube joint.

    I've also cracked a steel Colnago's RR (Colnago branded) dropout. It happens.

    BB's and right side chainstays are where the power goes and where frames fail. I've seen a bunch let go at the downtube, just back from the head tube two or three inches.
     
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  14. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    It was really strange. I was climbing up Baldy and felt a give. It was a strange feeling like I was pedaling while my hips were swinging side to side like Elvis. I thought I snapped the crank or BB shell. I got off and saw the crack. No way was I riding that thing home. Glad it was on the climb and not a downhill. Of course it would not happen on a dh. :D
     
  15. Bicycleman

    Bicycleman Well-Known Member

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    I ride a Lemond Tete de Course titanium frame. It was the top of the line model. I bought the frame in 2003 for $2,000 and put my Shimano Ultegra components on it. Now, it has a mixture of Ultegra, Sora, and 105, whatever works. Before I got the Tete de Course as part of an insurance settlement, I used to ride a Lemond Zurich (Reynolds Steel). I ran into the back of a car that stopped in front of me, and the tubes popped in three places.

    It sounds like you are a big gear pusher and you put out a lot of power. I used to do that as well. I was noted for breaking spokes every time I'd go out. I had a Kestrel carbon fiber many years ago. It was an extremely light and fast bike, but kept developing fractures in the frame. It was one of those composite frames with no lugs, just one frame as the bike. Every time I ever stood an sprinted, the frame would flex on me. Hence, I gave up on all carbon fiber bikes.

    I would still be riding that Zurich today if that lady hadn't decided to stop to see if she could get a signal on her cell phone. It was nice of her not to drive while using the cell phone. It just didn't help me where she stopped.
     
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  16. Bicycleman

    Bicycleman Well-Known Member

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    How did you get back home? Did momma ride back and get the car?
     
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  17. Bicycleman

    Bicycleman Well-Known Member

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    A lady friend of mine was on vacation one summer in the Italian Alps. She was riding a Lemond Zurich and the bottom bracket cracked on her. She was in one of those tour rides, so she was able to borrow a spare so she could finish the ride. She went into one of the local Italian bike shops and bought an American bike, a carbon fiber Specialized that she is still riding, today. If I was going to buy a bike in Italy, it wouldn't have been an American bike. I always tease her about that.
     
  18. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    Actually no big gears here! I am a major spinner. When we ride the trail a lot of riders are shocked that I am in my 39 chain ring while everybody else is in their big ring. I have a cadence of about 95 most times. I have to get up to about 22 mph before I need the 53.

    I used to mash when I first started cycling but one season on a trainer changed all that. Really improved my performance on century rides.
     
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  19. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    I was alone on one ride. I had to call momma to pick me up as it was starting to get dark. The second frame luckily we were about 2 miles from the truck. She rode back to get my truck.
     
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  20. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Sacrilege! Should have bought a Bianchi...a Colnago...a Pinarello...a Cinelli...a...Hell...she should have bought one of everything! All full Campy, of course.
     
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