Motivate me!

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Gregster, Nov 18, 2004.

  1. Gregster

    Gregster Guest

    I'm a rather unfit 27 year old. Having raced through the juniors,
    doing 400-500 miles per week from the age of 13-19, combined with
    football and rugby (and bowls....) Got married at 19, bugger! Now I'm
    nearly double my racing weight which was 9.5stone, at 18stone.

    I've still got my Ribble which I bought about 4 years ago when they
    started using the Dedacacci framesets which has done less than
    500miles. So I've got a decent bike.

    My main problem is that when I was in Liverpool up until the age of 18,
    if I didn't fancy going on the bike I could do, and still rack up
    milage on flat roads. Now I live in South Wales, it's bloody hilly and
    I know I've got to suffer no matter which way I go.

    My resting heart rate has risen from 44bpm to 85bpm, and last time it
    was measure d at 16, my lung capacity was over 7litres. I'm almost
    depressed by the change, even though it was my own fault. My diet
    nowadays is healthy, plenty of fruit/veg/rice/pasta. I've cut fizzy
    drinks out in recent weeks, even drinking the water from the tap.

    I have shared custody of my daughter so one week she's here 4 days, the
    following week 3 days. My job very often involves staying till nearly
    7pm and starting at 8.30. I need to try and squeeze any training
    around this.

    Help!!

    Greg
     
    Tags:


  2. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 18/11/04 11:55 pm, in article
    [email protected], "Gregster"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm a rather unfit 27 year old. Having raced through the juniors,
    > doing 400-500 miles per week from the age of 13-19, combined with
    > football and rugby (and bowls....) Got married at 19, bugger! Now I'm
    > nearly double my racing weight which was 9.5stone, at 18stone.
    >
    > I've still got my Ribble which I bought about 4 years ago when they
    > started using the Dedacacci framesets which has done less than
    > 500miles. So I've got a decent bike.
    >
    > My main problem is that when I was in Liverpool up until the age of 18,
    > if I didn't fancy going on the bike I could do, and still rack up
    > milage on flat roads. Now I live in South Wales, it's bloody hilly and
    > I know I've got to suffer no matter which way I go.
    >
    > My resting heart rate has risen from 44bpm to 85bpm, and last time it
    > was measure d at 16, my lung capacity was over 7litres. I'm almost
    > depressed by the change, even though it was my own fault. My diet
    > nowadays is healthy, plenty of fruit/veg/rice/pasta. I've cut fizzy
    > drinks out in recent weeks, even drinking the water from the tap.
    >
    > I have shared custody of my daughter so one week she's here 4 days, the
    > following week 3 days. My job very often involves staying till nearly
    > 7pm and starting at 8.30. I need to try and squeeze any training
    > around this.
    >


    How far from work?

    Actually, the main depressing thing is that when you are seriously
    overweight you find teh hills are really nasty and long. The trick is to not
    worry about speed. At all. Worry about time and heart rate and weight.

    The key thing is to make time, at least half an hour several times a week
    (though once or twice is still better than none.) Can you ride to work?

    Then jsut get out on the bike. You will not go anywhere near as far as you
    used to, or as fast. The hills will be murder. But your friend is the
    scales. They really motivate me. Weigh yourself every morning just after you
    get up. Record the weight one day a week on the same day. You might be able
    to persuade your daughter to help nag/encourage you in the weight loss.

    Now the mechanics.. the gears you rode as a fit, light eighteen year old on
    the flat will be unsuitable now. You'll need low gears and patience to spin
    up the hills. A triple is probably essential. And then it is a question of
    monitoring the heart rate and keeping it going for the appropriate amount of
    time. Don't worry about speed. Speed doesn't matter.

    You'll find it takes a couple of weeks to start noticing the difference,
    then, with a bit of self discipline in the diet, the weight will come down
    and the fitness will go up. In three weeks you'll feel better than you have
    done for a long time. In six weeks people will start to comment on the
    weight you have lost. In three months you'll be completely different
    physically.

    But the second week is the worst. The first week is bad, the second is
    worse, the third so-so, then you start to feel good.

    Best of luck and do let us know how you get on. I was 16.5 stone at 5'6" and
    very unfit. I lost eight inches around th ewaist and was fit enough to start
    time trialling again and get close to my PB. So hopefully this will
    encourage you.

    ...d
     
  3. Gregster wrote:

    > I'm a rather unfit 27 year old. Having raced through the juniors,
    > doing 400-500 miles per week from the age of 13-19, combined with
    > football and rugby (and bowls....) Got married at 19, bugger! Now I'm
    > nearly double my racing weight which was 9.5stone, at 18stone.


    [...]

    > My main problem is that when I was in Liverpool up until the age of 18,
    > if I didn't fancy going on the bike I could do, and still rack up
    > milage on flat roads. Now I live in South Wales, it's bloody hilly and
    > I know I've got to suffer no matter which way I go.


    I'm older than you, heavier than you, and I too live in hilly south
    Wales. If I can cycle, so can you.

    How's that? :)

    (Are you anywhere near the Taff trail? It's not really hilly at all, and
    is quite a pleasant ride)

    --
    Keith Willoughby http://flat222.org/keith/
    "You have nothing to fear, but fear itself....and monsters."
    - Richard Herring
     
  4. On Fri, 19 Nov 2004 00:07:36 +0000, David Martin
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    <BDC2E9C8.2F5F%[email protected]>:

    >Actually, the main depressing thing is that when you are seriously
    >overweight you find teh hills are really nasty and long. The trick is to not
    >worry about speed. At all. Worry about time and heart rate and weight.


    Or even not to worry about *anything* and just enjoy the feeling of
    being out on the bike.

    To the OP: don't complain about the hills. Some people would kill to
    live in countryside like that,and as long as you live in a valley the
    ride home is always going to be great :)

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
  5. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    On 18 Nov 2004 15:55:34 -0800, "Gregster" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I'm a rather unfit 27 year old. Having raced through the juniors,
    >doing 400-500 miles per week from the age of 13-19, combined with
    >football and rugby (and bowls....) Got married at 19, bugger! Now I'm
    >nearly double my racing weight which was 9.5stone, at 18stone.


    That base you got as a junior will still benefit you. It will be
    really tough at first. For the first few weeks you should avoid riding
    as fast as you want to - your body will remember how fast it used to
    go without realising it needs to get back into shape first. Aim to
    build up your mileage gradually before your speed, and don't be afraid
    to walk the hills when you need to. An 18 stone man walking up a steep
    hill and pushing a bicycle is getting plenty of exercise.

    Plot your projected weight loss over the next year and monitor your
    progress against it. Keep your current trousers when they stop fitting
    you and climb back into them from time to time to remind yourself what
    you have achieved.

    Start thinking about your 2006 racing season.

    --
    Dave...

    Get a bicycle. You will not regret it. If you live. - Mark Twain
     
  6. Tony B

    Tony B Guest

    > I'm a rather unfit 27 year old.

    This time last year I was an unfit 36 year old, 18stone plus and 42"
    kex. After six months of diet (atkins, yeah I know...) and a summer of
    cycling I'm now 32" kex and a rather trimmer 13st 8lb. Love to loose
    another stone though...

    Anyway, stay with it, it's top. There are a few here who have encouraged
    me, uk.r.c. has plenty of fit active cyclists but there are also a LOT
    of not so fit returnees like me (and now you!) and others. Mr Willoughby
    was good enough to say nice things about my progress earlier in the
    year, you be sure to post here with tales of derring do on the bike.
    Anything at all... your first killer hill tale will be fun! Everyone
    chips in with a "well done" following a PB post of some sort.

    My new body shape is also a positive boon when enjoying time with my
    kids, I can almost keep up with them now. Mrs B seems happy too!

    I got some proper scales (c/w body fat monitor in them) and measure and
    record every day. I helps no end, also take some measurements (waist,
    thighs, etc) and see how they reduce, it all makes it worthwhile.

    Booze is prolly best avoided for a couple or three months, not easy at Xmas.

    However, there is a downside - you will have to throw all your fat lad
    clothes away and buy new. I'd advise against buying any decent togs for
    the next twelve months, I went through trousers like nobodies business
    last spring. Maybe we could start a clothes share or something, passing
    the various sizes round as we all shrink to realistic proportions.

    I wish I'd have realised the error of my ways when I was 27, instead of
    almost 37...

    see you on the road then,

    Tony B
     
  7. Jack Ouzzi

    Jack Ouzzi Guest

    On 18 Nov 2004 15:55:34 -0800, "Gregster" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > it's bloody hilly and I know I've got to suffer no matter which way I go.


    It's all in the mind !!

    >
    >My resting heart rate has risen from 44bpm to 85bpm, and last time it
    >was measure d at 16, my lung capacity was over 7litres. I'm almost
    >depressed by the change, even though it was my own fault. My diet
    >nowadays is healthy, plenty of fruit/veg/rice/pasta. I've cut fizzy
    >drinks out in recent weeks, even drinking the water from the tap.
    >


    Good start.

    Mine is a similar story, but I am looking at 55, and had not ridden
    for 16 years. Blood pressure was high (not too high) but because of a
    combination of driving everywhere, walking about 30 paces max most
    days, and a liking for Best Bitter, and about 2 stone overweight.

    'I used to race a bike' I told the Doc, 'Still have a fixie hanging in
    the shed'

    After a mild bollocking from the Doc, and a promise to put me on
    tablets for the rest of my life (I HATE tablets) he told me to go
    away, dust off said Fixie, ease off the sherbert and return in 6
    weeks.

    Off I went, it took a couple of days to get the 'bum' back, the legs
    and lungs seemed fine, but just needed 'tuning'

    After 6 weeks and about 800 miles the BP is now normal, lost about 4kg
    (sorry can't convert) and loving it!! Just need some better weather
    now.

    MAKE yourself do it Greg, and as a previous poster said, if you want
    to race again, 2006 would be a great target incentive. See you on the
    2006 start sheet then :eek:)
     
  8. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Gregster" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'm a rather unfit 27 year old.


    snip
    >
    > Help!!



    Pick a nice, crisp and sunny day, get suitably clothed (not too hot, not too
    cold), get on the bike and ride through nice countryside for 10 to 15 miles.
    Take it slow -- its not a race.

    Get home, have a nice cup of tea and a hot shower.

    The buzz will be so great that you will do it again and again.

    For me there is no greater motivation to cycle than the buzz I get from
    cycling and the crappy, crabby feeling I get if I don't cycle regularly.

    Sadly, because of work and builders in at home I'm feeling crabby at the
    moment -- must rescue the bike and get back on it.

    T
     
  9. Paul Rudin

    Paul Rudin Guest

    "Gregster" <[email protected]> writes:


    > I have shared custody of my daughter so one week she's here 4 days, the
    > following week 3 days. My job very often involves staying till nearly
    > 7pm and starting at 8.30. I need to try and squeeze any training
    > around this.


    How far is it too work? If it's a sensible distance then cycling to
    and from work might help. Do you get a decent lunch break? If so maybe
    you can run or cycle at lunch time?
     
  10. Hi Greg.

    From a fatbirdonabike to a fatblokeonabike ;-)

    Don't worry. Take it slow & steady. Don't be afraid to get off & walk up any
    hills that you are finding too hard. Put past glories behind you and accept
    that now is what you are dealing with. Heck, I used to be a champion dancer
    when I was younger, but I have no illusions about doing now what I used to do
    in my youth. If I tried any of that, I'd kill myself :-Þ

    Just *enjoy* your cycling, however much or however little you do. Don't see it
    as must-do training to have instant results. To be overweight and lose it takes
    a long-term view. Don't set yourself too high a task - be modest about what you
    can relaistically acheive and then when you've done that, go about improving a
    little more. That way you are less likely to get put-off if you don't make the
    big goal quickly?

    When I first got back on a bike I couldn't cycle 5 miles without having to get
    off for inclines considerably less steep than those in South Wales. Now I'd
    still have to get off for the Welsh ones, but I can cycle all day on gentle
    terrain.

    Cheers, helen s

    --This is an invalid email address to avoid spam--
    to get correct one remove fame & fortune
    h*$el*$$e*nd**$o$ts**i*$*$m*m$o*n*[email protected]$*a$o*l.c**$om$

    --Due to financial crisis the light at the end of the tunnel is switched off--
     
  11. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    Dave Kahn <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    >
    > Start thinking about your 2006 racing season.


    I thought you were trying to motivate him, not put him off!
    --

    Simon M.
     
  12. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    On 19 Nov 2004 08:20:47 -0800, [email protected] (Simon Mason) wrote:

    >Dave Kahn <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >>
    >> Start thinking about your 2006 racing season.

    >
    >I thought you were trying to motivate him, not put him off!


    He raced as a junior. He likes to suffer,

    --
    Dave...

    Get a bicycle. You will not regret it. If you live. - Mark Twain
     
  13. Doki

    Doki Guest

    Gregster wrote:
    > I'm a rather unfit 27 year old. Having raced through the juniors,
    > doing 400-500 miles per week from the age of 13-19, combined with
    > football and rugby (and bowls....) Got married at 19, bugger! Now I'm
    > nearly double my racing weight which was 9.5stone, at 18stone.
    >
    > I've still got my Ribble which I bought about 4 years ago when they
    > started using the Dedacacci framesets which has done less than
    > 500miles. So I've got a decent bike.
    >
    > My main problem is that when I was in Liverpool up until the age of
    > 18, if I didn't fancy going on the bike I could do, and still rack up
    > milage on flat roads. Now I live in South Wales, it's bloody hilly
    > and I know I've got to suffer no matter which way I go.
    >
    > My resting heart rate has risen from 44bpm to 85bpm, and last time it
    > was measure d at 16, my lung capacity was over 7litres. I'm almost
    > depressed by the change, even though it was my own fault. My diet
    > nowadays is healthy, plenty of fruit/veg/rice/pasta. I've cut fizzy
    > drinks out in recent weeks, even drinking the water from the tap.
    >
    > I have shared custody of my daughter so one week she's here 4 days,
    > the following week 3 days. My job very often involves staying till
    > nearly 7pm and starting at 8.30. I need to try and squeeze any
    > training around this.


    Go mountain biking, it's approximately 5000 times more interesting than road
    riding, so you'll do it more often ;).
     
  14. gemarc

    gemarc New Member

    Joined:
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    The point about slowing down on hills is spot on.

    Living in Sheffield I have little choice but to climb hills but once you get used to its great.

    Key thing I find is to slow right down to a speed you feel comfortable at and do not worry about how long it takes you to get to the top infact I often dont even look at the top of the hill as it can put you off!

    Still cant get up winnats pass with the wind against me though but thats a different story :)

    As for motivation I find I nearly always enjoy the days when I cycle more than the ones I dont.
     
  15. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    Paul Rudin [email protected] opined the following...
    > How far is it too work? If it's a sensible distance then cycling to
    > and from work might help. Do you get a decent lunch break? If so maybe
    > you can run or cycle at lunch time?


    Get an irritating and stressful job with colleagues that you cannot
    stand to be around. Then start going for rides at lunch to burn off the
    stress.

    ;-)

    Failing that (Which isn't really recommended!) find a local cycling club
    and sound them out with regard to "beginner" rides. Riding with other
    people is a great motivator and prevents you from just giving up. Since
    you're male, the stupid macho testosterone thing which means that you
    can't give up when there is someone watching will kick in. After a
    couple of weeks your base level of fitness will have improved massively
    and it'll stop being a chore.

    Commuting by bike is definately a good way to go. Make sure that you
    have the clothing for it over the winter.

    Jon
     
  16. Paul Rudin

    Paul Rudin Guest

    Jon Senior <jon_AT_restlesslemon_DOTco_DOT_uk> writes:

    > Paul Rudin [email protected] opined the following...
    >> How far is it too work? If it's a sensible distance then cycling to
    >> and from work might help. Do you get a decent lunch break? If so maybe
    >> you can run or cycle at lunch time?

    >
    > Get an irritating and stressful job with colleagues that you cannot
    > stand to be around. Then start going for rides at lunch to burn off the
    > stress.


    Or even find some cow-orkers who like getting some exercise as
    well. At my work there are several of us who regularly run together at
    lunch time. If there's someone to go with you're much less likely to
    skip sessions.
     
  17. Gregster

    Gregster Guest

    Thanks for all your help peeps.

    I live a mile from work, but due to having the daughter half the time I
    have to use taxis to get her to school, and I also have to wear
    business dress with no changing facilities at work :(

    I've lost a few pounds this week just by cutting out the beer and other
    fizzy drinks, shirts already fit differently :) Just got to get out
    this week on the bike as it is my 3 day week with my daughter.
     
  18. iarocu

    iarocu Guest

    "Gregster" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'm a rather unfit 27 year old.


    Just take it steady. You will enjoy it more as your fitness returns. I
    find keeping a training diary helps. Not in detail just miles cycled,
    or minutes run per day. On the odd day when you don't feel in the mood
    for going on the bike the motivation to get out is avoiding too many
    blank pages in the diary. If feasable c ycle to work. If it's part of
    your daily routine you do more of it.
    In your 20s your fitness will improve fast anyway but as you get
    older (40s for me) it becomes more a case of use it or lose it. If you
    get unfit it takes longer to get it back.
    Iain
     
  19. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>,
    Gregster ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Thanks for all your help peeps.
    >
    > I live a mile from work, but due to having the daughter half the time
    > I have to use taxis to get her to school, and I also have to wear
    > business dress with no changing facilities at work :(
    >
    > I've lost a few pounds this week just by cutting out the beer and
    > other
    > fizzy drinks, shirts already fit differently :) Just got to get out
    > this week on the bike as it is my 3 day week with my daughter.


    How old is your daughter? If under eight, get her a trailer or a
    trailer-bike; if over eight, get her a bike. Go cycling together; make
    it something you do together.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; Life would be much easier if I had the source code.
     
  20. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    On 22 Nov 2004 06:12:31 -0800, [email protected] (iarocu) wrote:

    > In your 20s your fitness will improve fast anyway but as you get
    >older (40s for me) it becomes more a case of use it or lose it. If you
    >get unfit it takes longer to get it back.


    But it still does come back. It has been found that even geriatric
    patients who have been sedentary for years get almost immediate
    benefits from an exercise program. Strength, stamina, flexibility and
    general quality of life all improve.

    --
    Dave...

    Get a bicycle. You will not regret it. If you live. - Mark Twain
     
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