Motivation for cycling

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Burton Figg, May 30, 2003.

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  1. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter <[email protected]> wrote:

    : And what's wrong with TTs if he enjoys them??? ;-)

    Nothing at all. I ride them myself :)

    The pproblem is that in this country it's possible to consider youself a racing cyclist having never
    ridden anything other than flat, dragstrip TTs. I think that's odd.

    For road races, try the TLI. It's much more beginner friendly that the BCF. Races are usually
    handicap pursuits (ie slower riders get X minutes head-start) and are cheap(er).

    They don't seem to have any web presence, but they do have races all over the country.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org Power is delightful. Absolute power is absolutely delightful -
    Lord Lester
     


  2. Msa

    Msa Guest

    The emphasis on time trialing
    > (and in particular on fast times for set distances) is very bad for cycle sport in this
    > country IMO.
    >
    > Arthur
    >
    > --
    > Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org Power is delightful. Absolute power is absolutely delightful -
    > Lord Lester

    Why do you say this Arthur? What's your thoughts?

    --
    Mark
    ____________________________
    Practice does not make perfect... Perfect practice makes perfect

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  3. Msa

    Msa Guest

    MSA <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > The emphasis on time trialing
    > > (and in particular on fast times for set distances) is very bad for cycle sport in this
    > > country IMO.
    > >
    > > Arthur
    > >
    > > --
    > > Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org Power is delightful. Absolute power is absolutely delightful
    > > - Lord
    Lester
    >
    >
    >
    > Why do you say this Arthur? What's your thoughts?

    Should have read further down the thread...sorry :)

    --
    Mark
    ____________________________
    Practice does not make perfect... Perfect practice makes perfect

    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
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  4. James Hodson

    James Hodson Guest

    On Fri, 30 May 2003 19:53:28 +0000 (UTC), "Burton Figg" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >So my point? My wife was talking to me yesterday and said she has heard it said that often keen
    >cyclists have had overbearing and bullying fathers. I'm not after gory details, since it is not my
    >place to ask for them and I wouldn't be so rude.
    >
    >I just wondered what folk thought about this theory - i.e if you're mildly screwed up about your
    >dad you might be more inclined to get into cycling, to perhaps:
    >

    Hi Burton

    Gory detail coming up: I was born in November 1964 and my father died in February 1965, so I never
    knew him. I may well be the exception that proves the rule - or not.

    James

    --
    http://homepage.ntlworld.com/c.butty/Dscf0632.jpg
     
  5. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter <[email protected]> wrote:
    :>The pproblem is that in this country it's possible to consider youself a racing cyclist having
    :>never ridden anything other than flat, dragstrip TTs.

    : Wots one of them? Not many flat ones round here ... says she thinking Ketteringham circuit ...

    OK, to explain some more.

    First, doing local TT's on nice courses is good fun. I do this myself and really enjoy it. I'd
    encourage anyone else to do this as well. It's what happens next that's the problem.

    Let's say you (or Nathan, or me or whoever) decides that this TT lark is good and they want to
    compete more seriously. Now the problems arise.

    Since all TT's are based on entry times with no consideration give to placings doing 22:23 for a 10
    on a dual carriageeway when there was an army column going past (and this has been know) gets more
    credit that winning a sporting 10 with (say) 24.xx.

    So, if you want to get in the big races (National 10 say?), you need to ride fast courses. If you
    want credit from your peers (who only respect times) you have to ride the fast courses.

    So everything forces riders into doing the very fast, busy, dangerous courses where they
    will go fast.

    If you opt out of this and only ride "sporting" courses (as I do), then you will never get anywhere
    in the TT world.

    That's the problem with it.

    Anyway, road racing is much better for you :)

    Arthur


    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org Power is delightful. Absolute power is absolutely delightful -
    Lord Lester
     
  6. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:

    > Anyway, road racing is much better for you :)

    My exposure to TT is seeing a "fast course" race once in a while. Chaps on exotic looking bikes well
    spaced out along on the reasonably flat A90 dual carriageway from here to Perth. It would turn my
    brain into cream cheese doing something like that, which wouldn't be good for me, so I can
    sympathise with your assessment above! ;-/

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  7. "Arthur Clune" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > For road races, try the TLI. It's much more beginner friendly that the BCF. Races are usually
    > handicap pursuits (ie slower riders get X minutes head-start) and are cheap(er).
    >

    Agree with Arthur here - haven't done any TLI racing myself, but they seem to be more accessible to
    people who just want to give road racing a try occasionally. And their fees are easier on the
    wallet, even for non-TLI members. Have to admit that the expense of events run under BCF rules put
    me off road racing in a big way, not that I ever really enjoyed it much anyway! 'Cross is a
    different kettle of fish, and I don't just mean that I find it loads of fun - even under BCF regs,
    races are cheap [1] to enter and can be done without owning a full licence (BCF Bronze membership
    will do, and most races are EoL) - the only exceptions are the big events, chiefly the British
    Championships and the National Trophy series.

    David E. Belcher

    Dept. of Chemistry, University of York

    [1] Approx. 8 quid entry on the line, for which sum you often get the luxury of changing facilities
    & showers.
     
  8. On Tue, 03 Jun 2003 10:06:16 +0100, Peter Clinch
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Arthur Clune wrote:
    >
    >> Anyway, road racing is much better for you :)
    >
    >My exposure to TT is seeing a "fast course" race once in a while. Chaps on exotic looking bikes
    >well spaced out along on the reasonably flat A90 dual carriageway from here to Perth.

    Dundee to Perth - drooollll!!!!(1) Faster, faster - speed, speeed, speeeed!!

    Sorry, had a flashback to my testing days.

    The A90 was Scotland's answer to the "dragstrips" in England - (the Boro' etc). Of course when I
    moved down south for a couple of years I ended up in Bristol where the TT courses were "sporting" to
    say the least.

    (1) the noise Homer makes when he says "Doughnuts...."

    Regards! Stephen
     
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