Mountain bike sizing



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M

Mike

Guest
With mountain bikes being sized different than road bikes, I am curious as to the approx. size to
look for. I'm 6'0" with a 33" inseam. Thanks Mike
 
K

Ken

Guest
"Mike" <[email protected]> wrote in news:v7cttbrhdoir32 @corp.supernews.com:

> With mountain bikes being sized different than road bikes, I am curious as to the approx. size to
> look for.

Sizing varies widely from brand to brand. You really need to test ride the bikes. Especially for
taller riders, "virtual" top tube length is more important than stand over height.

Ken
 
B

Bruce

Guest
Mike wrote:
> With mountain bikes being sized different than road bikes, I am curious as to the approx. size to
> look for. I'm 6'0" with a 33" inseam.

Try "large". Conventional frame size measurements dont make much sense on modern mountain bikes.
Just be sure the seat goes high enough, and there is enough clearance between balls and top-tube,
with feet on the ground. The more the better, when going off-road. Of course, its a compromise with
strength and rigidity (which are traded against frame weight, ...)

BTW, why is frame size, as measured by seat-tube length, considered so important on road bikes? So
long as the seat is in the right place, does it really matter that much exactly how high the
top-tube is?
 
M

Mike Jacoubowsk

Guest
> BTW, why is frame size, as measured by seat-tube length, considered so important on road bikes? So
> long as the seat is in the right place, does it really matter that much exactly how high the
> top-tube is?

It matters because it gives you an idea of where the handlebar is going to be. There are only three
points of contact (hopefully!) on a bike. Seat, pedals and bars. It's all about defining that
geometry, and frame "height" help determine the front end. Curious that we measure the rear-center
of the bike to get an idea of the front height, isn't it?

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

"Bruce" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Mike wrote:
> > With mountain bikes being sized different than road bikes, I am curious
as
> > to the approx. size to look for. I'm 6'0" with a 33" inseam.
>
> Try "large". Conventional frame size measurements dont make much sense on modern mountain bikes.
> Just be sure the seat goes high enough, and there is enough clearance between balls and top-tube,
> with feet on the ground. The more the better, when going off-road. Of course, its a compromise
> with strength and rigidity (which are traded against frame weight, ...)
>
> BTW, why is frame size, as measured by seat-tube length, considered so important on road bikes? So
> long as the seat is in the right place, does it really matter that much exactly how high the
> top-tube is?
 
A

Ajames54™

Guest
On Mon, 17 Mar 2003 19:33:23 -0600, "Mike" <[email protected]> wrote:

>With mountain bikes being sized different than road bikes, I am curious as to the approx. size to
>look for. I'm 6'0" with a 33" inseam. Thanks Mike
>
Mountain bikes vary greatly in their basic geometry far more so than road bikes you really have to
try them out... that being said your measurements exactly match mine so I will say my Kestrel is
19.5" and my Gunnar is 19" I used to have a 19" Mountain Goat as well ... however my old
RockyMountain was an 18" they had a longer than average top tube measurement (and I was much more
flexible way back then..sigh)
 
Q

Qui Si Parla Ca

Guest
molson-<< With mountain bikes being sized different than road bikes, I am curious as to the approx.
size to look for. I'm 6'0" with a 33" inseam.

mtb bikes are sized like road bikes and inseam means little when compared to femur length(seat tube
angle) and torso/arm length coupled with flexibility(effective top tube length and stem length).

In addition, since a one 'size' of a MTB frameset(say a 17 inch) vaires wildly from manufacturer to
manufacturer, cannot really say what size you need.

For the reasons above-

Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
(303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
 
Q

Qui Si Parla Ca

Guest
bruce-<< BTW, why is frame size, as measured by seat-tube length, considered so important on road
bikes? So long as the seat is in the right place, does it really matter that much exactly how high
the top-tube is?

A road frame 'size' means as little on a road frameset as it does on a MTB frameset. Size, measured
in seat tube length, means nada. Seat tube angle and top tube length are important, but are seldom
included and vary wildly from maker to maker.

Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
(303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
 
T

Terry Morse

Guest
Bruce wrote:

> BTW, why is frame size, as measured by seat-tube length, considered so important on road bikes? So
> long as the seat is in the right place, does it really matter that much exactly how high the
> top-tube is?

Top tube height is important if you want to get your handlebar height anywhere close to your saddle
height. Today's fashion is to have the bars several inches below the saddle, presumably because it
"looks racy".
--
terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
 
M

Matt O'Toole

Guest
"Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...

> > BTW, why is frame size, as measured by seat-tube length,
considered so
> > important on road bikes? So long as the seat is in the
right place, does
> > it really matter that much exactly how high the top-tube
is?
>
> It matters because it gives you an idea of where the
handlebar is going to
> be. There are only three points of contact (hopefully!)
on a bike. Seat,
> pedals and bars. It's all about defining that geometry,
and frame "height"
> help determine the front end. Curious that we measure the
rear-center of
> the bike to get an idea of the front height, isn't it?

This is true. The biggest problem for a tall rider is getting the handlebar high enough. If your
frame is too small, the cockpit length can be adjusted with a longer stem, but the bar may still
be too low.

Matt O.
 
A

Ajames54

Guest
On Thu, 22 May 2003 22:35:09 GMT, "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote:

>
>"Mike" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
>> With mountain bikes being sized different than road bikes,
>I am curious as
>> to the approx. size to look for. I'm 6'0" with a 33" inseam.
>
>"Large."
>
>Matt O.
>
As long as large is somewhere between 18.5 and 20.5 (depending on frame type)
 
P

Peter Cole

Guest
"Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...

> This is true. The biggest problem for a tall rider is getting the handlebar high enough. If your
> frame is too small, the cockpit length can be adjusted with a longer stem, but the bar may still
> be too low.

As a very tall rider (6'10", 210cm), I disagree. You can extend the steerer tube and/or use
hi-rise stems/bars to get the bars arbitrarily high. Getting the cockpit length and fore-aft
balance are more difficult, since as you extend the seatpost and steerer, the center of gravity
shifts backwards. Using a very long reach stem (if they were even made) screws up steering. Tall
riders need more wheelbase (for stability), too. The critical frame dimension for a tall person is
toptube length.
 
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