Mountain biking posture.

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Tetsuo Shima, Apr 26, 2004.

  1. Tetsuo Shima

    Tetsuo Shima Guest

    What are the correct settings for the handlebars and seat,
    (as in how much higher the handlebars should be above the
    seat in relation to body length and arm length.)

    The reason i'm asking is that I seem to be leaning too far
    forward and putting a lot of strain on my wrists, (which can
    hurt a lot after long haul rides.)

    Links to relevents site gratefully welcome.
     
    Tags:


  2. Tetsuo Shima

    Tetsuo Shima Guest

    "Tetsuo Shima" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What are the correct settings for the handlebars and seat,
    > (as in how much higher the handlebars should be above the
    > seat in relation to body length and arm length.)
    >
    > The reason i'm asking is that I seem to be leaning too far
    > forward and putting a lot of strain on my wrists, (which
    > can hurt a lot after long
    haul
    > rides.)
    >
    > Links to relevents site gratefully welcome.
    >
    >
    Would riser bars help? I've found some Truvative Hussefelt
    Riser Bars, but would I heed higher? If so, what?
     
  3. Tetsuo Shima wrote:
    > What are the correct settings for the handlebars and seat,
    > (as in how much higher the handlebars should be above the
    > seat in relation to body length and arm length.)
    >
    > The reason i'm asking is that I seem to be leaning too far
    > forward and putting a lot of strain on my wrists, (which
    > can hurt a lot after long haul rides.)
    >
    > Links to relevents site gratefully welcome.

    http://www.wrenchscience.com/WS1/default.asp

    You could start off here just so you'll get into the
    ballpark. BTW I don't know anybody that has their
    handlebars higher than their saddle. Even with or lower
    seems to be more common. Except for City street riders of
    course. If you're beginning you may just need to get used
    to being on a bike.

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  4. Carla A-G

    Carla A-G Guest

    "Tetsuo Shima" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Tetsuo Shima" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]i-berlin.de...
    > > What are the correct settings for the handlebars and
    > > seat, (as in how
    much
    > > higher the handlebars should be above the seat in
    > > relation to body
    length
    > > and arm length.)
    > >
    > > The reason i'm asking is that I seem to be leaning too
    > > far forward and putting a lot of strain on my wrists,
    > > (which can hurt a lot after long
    > haul
    > > rides.)
    > >
    > > Links to relevents site gratefully welcome.
    > >
    > >
    > Would riser bars help? I've found some Truvative Hussefelt
    > Riser Bars,
    but
    > would I heed higher? If so, what?

    Riser bars and a shorter stem. Also, play with your saddle,
    it might be too far set back on your seatpost. If that
    doesn't help, then you probably have a bike that has too
    long of a top tube for your body type.

    - CA-G

    Can-Am Girls Kick Ass!
     
  5. Franck

    Franck Guest

    Tetsuo Shima wrote:
    > What are the correct settings for the handlebars and seat,
    > (as in how much higher the handlebars should be above the
    > seat in relation to body length and arm length.)
    >
    > The reason i'm asking is that I seem to be leaning too far
    > forward and putting a lot of strain on my wrists, (which
    > can hurt a lot after long haul rides.)
    >
    > Links to relevents site gratefully welcome.

    Besides bike fit, also make sure that you
    - keep a good hand / forearm alignment to minimize the
    bend in your wrist - both sideways & up/down.
    Adjusting the width of your handlebar, bending your
    elbows, and positioning your brake handles are things
    you can look into.
    - keep you elbows bent so they work as shock absorbers
    - strengthen your core muscles - they can/should take up
    some of the weight off of your hands.

    Franck
     
  6. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    On Mon, 26 Apr 2004 20:15:26 +0100, Tetsuo Shima wrote:

    > What are the correct settings for the handlebars and seat,
    > (as in how much higher the handlebars should be above the
    > seat in relation to body length and arm length.)
    >
    > The reason i'm asking is that I seem to be leaning too far
    > forward and putting a lot of strain on my wrists, (which
    > can hurt a lot after long haul rides.)

    First of all, check that your wrists are in the right
    position. A lot people have their brake levers at the wrong
    angle, and as they're covering the brakes during a ride, it
    puts unnecessary strain on the wrists.

    Sit on your bike in the normal riding position and extend
    your index and middle fingers to rest on the levers. There
    should be (more or less) a straight line down your forearms
    to the tips of your fingers.
     
  7. Tetsuo Shima

    Tetsuo Shima Guest

    "Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Tetsuo Shima wrote:
    > > What are the correct settings for the handlebars and
    > > seat, (as in how much higher the handlebars should be
    > > above the seat in relation to body length and arm
    > > length.)
    > >
    > > The reason i'm asking is that I seem to be leaning too
    > > far forward and putting a lot of strain on my wrists,
    > > (which can hurt a lot after long haul rides.)
    > >
    > > Links to relevents site gratefully welcome.
    >
    > http://www.wrenchscience.com/WS1/default.asp
    >
    > You could start off here just so you'll get into the
    > ballpark. BTW I don't know anybody that has their
    > handlebars higher than their
    saddle.
    > Even with or lower seems to be more common. Except for
    > City street riders
    of
    > course. If you're beginning you may just need to get used
    > to being on a bike.
    >
    > --
    > Perre
    >
    > You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
    >
    >

    I've been riding for years, but i've found over the last few
    years that I get a lot of back/wrist problems, i'm thinking
    that it's something to do with my setup.
     
  8. Tetsuo Shima

    Tetsuo Shima Guest

    "Carla A-G" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Tetsuo Shima" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Tetsuo Shima" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > message news:[email protected]
    > > berlin.de...
    > > > What are the correct settings for the handlebars and
    > > > seat, (as in how
    > much
    > > > higher the handlebars should be above the seat in
    > > > relation to body
    > length
    > > > and arm length.)
    > > >
    > > > The reason i'm asking is that I seem to be leaning too
    > > > far forward and putting a lot of strain on my wrists,
    > > > (which can hurt a lot after long
    > > haul
    > > > rides.)
    > > >
    > > > Links to relevents site gratefully welcome.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > Would riser bars help? I've found some Truvative
    > > Hussefelt Riser Bars,
    > but
    > > would I heed higher? If so, what?
    >
    > Riser bars and a shorter stem. Also, play with your
    > saddle, it might be
    too
    > far set back on your seatpost. If that doesn't help, then
    > you probably
    have
    > a bike that has too long of a top tube for your body type.
    >
    > - CA-G
    >
    > Can-Am Girls Kick Ass!
    >
    >
    I have a good idea, i'll take all measurements of me and my
    bike and then hopefully someone might be able to tell me if
    I do need to invest in different bars and stem.
     
  9. Tetsuo Shima

    Tetsuo Shima Guest

    "Franck" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Tetsuo Shima wrote:
    > > What are the correct settings for the handlebars and
    > > seat, (as in how much higher the handlebars should be
    > > above the seat in relation to body length and arm
    > > length.)
    > >
    > > The reason i'm asking is that I seem to be leaning too
    > > far forward and putting a lot of strain on my wrists,
    > > (which can hurt a lot after long haul rides.)
    > >
    > > Links to relevents site gratefully welcome.
    >
    > Besides bike fit, also make sure that you
    > - keep a good hand / forearm alignment to minimize the
    > bend in your
    wrist -
    > both sideways & up/down. Adjusting the width of your
    > handlebar, bending
    your
    > elbows, and positioning your brake handles are things you
    > can look into.
    > - keep you elbows bent so they work as shock absorbers
    > - strengthen your core muscles - they can/should take up
    > some of the
    weight
    > off of your hands.
    >
    > Franck
    >
    >

    I've always kept my elbows bent. The best way I can
    explain it is that it feels like all my bodyweight is
    falling onto my wrists, I can't seem to shift my weight
    backwards a little.
     
  10. Tetsuo Shima

    Tetsuo Shima Guest

    "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 26 Apr 2004 20:15:26 +0100, Tetsuo Shima wrote:
    >
    > > What are the correct settings for the handlebars and
    > > seat, (as in how
    much
    > > higher the handlebars should be above the seat in
    > > relation to body
    length
    > > and arm length.)
    > >
    > > The reason i'm asking is that I seem to be leaning too
    > > far forward and putting a lot of strain on my wrists,
    > > (which can hurt a lot after long
    haul
    > > rides.)
    >
    > First of all, check that your wrists are in the right
    > position. A lot people have their brake levers at the
    > wrong angle, and as they're covering the brakes during a
    > ride, it puts unnecessary strain on the wrists.
    >
    > Sit on your bike in the normal riding position and extend
    > your index and middle fingers to rest on the levers. There
    > should be (more or less) a straight line down your
    > forearms to the tips of your fingers.
    >

    I was told that one a long time ago and always stuck to it.
    I do have a ganglion cyst on my righht hand, that can play
    up really bad from time to time. As i've said before, I just
    need to ease the pressure off, but how?
     
  11. Tetsuo Shima

    Tetsuo Shima Guest

    "Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Tetsuo Shima wrote:
    > > What are the correct settings for the handlebars and
    > > seat, (as in how much higher the handlebars should be
    > > above the seat in relation to body length and arm
    > > length.)
    > >
    > > The reason i'm asking is that I seem to be leaning too
    > > far forward and putting a lot of strain on my wrists,
    > > (which can hurt a lot after long haul rides.)
    > >
    > > Links to relevents site gratefully welcome.
    >
    > http://www.wrenchscience.com/WS1/default.asp
    >
    > You could start off here just so you'll get into the
    > ballpark. BTW I don't know anybody that has their
    > handlebars higher than their
    saddle.
    > Even with or lower seems to be more common. Except for
    > City street riders
    of
    > course. If you're beginning you may just need to get used
    > to being on a bike.
    >
    > --
    > Perre
    >
    > You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
    >
    >
    That is perfect, thanks a million.
     
  12. Tetsuo Shima wrote:
    > I've always kept my elbows bent. The best way I can
    > explain it is that it feels like all my bodyweight is
    > falling onto my wrists, I can't seem to shift my weight
    > backwards a little.

    I had the same experience a while back, of falling
    forward. I moved my whole cockpit back a bit and this
    balanced me out.
    Ie. I moved my saddle back 15 mm and exchanged stems for a
    15 mm shorter stem. This way I still had exactly the
    same distance to my bars but my center of gravity had
    moved back a little and it took a lot of the weight off
    my hands. Plus I felt much more comfortable and balanced

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  13. Tetsuo Shima

    Tetsuo Shima Guest

    "Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Tetsuo Shima wrote:
    > > I've always kept my elbows bent. The best way I can
    > > explain it is that it feels like all my bodyweight is
    > > falling onto my wrists, I can't seem to shift my weight
    > > backwards a little.
    >
    > I had the same experience a while back, of falling
    > forward. I moved my
    whole
    > cockpit back a bit and this balanced me out.
    > Ie. I moved my saddle back 15 mm and exchanged stems for a
    > 15 mm shorter stem. This way I still had exactly the
    > same distance to my bars but my center of gravity had
    > moved back a little and it took a lot of the weight
    > off my hands. Plus I felt much more comfortable and
    > balanced
    >
    > --
    > Perre
    >
    > You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
    >
    >
    That makes a lot of sense, i've got a feeling my stem is
    way too long anyway. It's 23.30 am, so i'll check it all
    out tomorrow.

    I did all the measurements on the site and got the info
    I require.
     
  14. Penny S

    Penny S Guest

    Tetsuo Shima wrote:
    >
    > I did all the measurements on the site and got the info I
    > require.

    You might consider asking around as to which lbs in your
    area does fittings, and who is the "good guy" to talk to for
    that kind of stuff. When I got my bike, we set it up on a
    trainer and he eyeballed a few things, measured a few
    things, tweaked a few things for a really excellent fit. He
    did my hubby too, and we ended up changing his stem which
    made a significant difference

    Penny
     
  15. Tetsuo Shima

    Tetsuo Shima Guest

    "Penny S" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Tetsuo Shima wrote:
    > >
    > > I did all the measurements on the site and got the info
    > > I require.
    >
    > You might consider asking around as to which lbs in your
    > area does
    fittings,
    > and who is the "good guy" to talk to for that kind of
    > stuff. When I got my bike, we set it up on a trainer and
    > he eyeballed a few things, measured a few things, tweaked
    > a few things for a really excellent fit. He did my hubby
    > too, and we ended up changing his stem which made a
    > significant difference
    >
    > Penny
    >
    >
    Unfortunately "good" bikeshops are very hard to find here.
     
  16. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    Tetsuo Shima wrote:

    > "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]...
    >
    >>Sit on your bike in the normal riding position and extend
    >>your index and middle fingers to rest on the levers. There
    >>should be (more or less) a straight line down your
    >>forearms to the tips of your fingers.
    >>
    >
    >
    > I was told that one a long time ago and always stuck to
    > it. I do have a ganglion cyst on my righht hand, that can
    > play up really bad from time to time. As i've said before,
    > I just need to ease the pressure off, but how?
    >
    >
    I have one of those gargoylian cyst too, but on my left
    wrist. Hurts like a SOB sometimes. Actually, I'm beginning
    to have problems with my right wrist now. I have a good
    feeling that it's more computer induced than riding though.

    My handlebars (risers) are above my saddle, maybe an inch.
    It's definitely not the norm for just about every other
    rider I' seen, but that's where I like it. You'll need to
    experiment a little for find out works for you. Buy some
    cheap (closeout or even used) different size stems just for
    a fit test. Once you find one that works for ya, then maybe
    you can buy the *good* stuff.

    BTW, my riding buddies (around the same size as me) that
    always hop on my bike to tool around in the parking
    lot/trail always comment how much more they like my
    setup than their own. But then again, that's only for a
    few minutes.

    Don't overlook your grips. Very important. I recently
    switched to Oury Lock-Ons. I like them a lot. There's
    another dude on this NG that uses these http://www.extremes-
    teering.com/Silicone_Grips_Shock_Absorbing.htm I saw them at
    my LBS, and do look like they're very effective, so that's a
    possible solution for you.

    --
    Slacker
     
  17. Pippen

    Pippen Guest

    "Tetsuo Shima" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Penny S" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Tetsuo Shima wrote:
    > > >
    > > > I did all the measurements on the site and got the
    > > > info I require.
    > >
    > > You might consider asking around as to which lbs in your
    > > area does
    > fittings,
    > > and who is the "good guy" to talk to for that kind of
    > > stuff. When I got
    my
    > > bike, we set it up on a trainer and he eyeballed a few
    > > things, measured
    a
    > > few things, tweaked a few things for a really excellent
    > > fit. He did my hubby too, and we ended up changing his
    > > stem which made a significant difference
    > >
    > > Penny
    > >
    > >
    > Unfortunately "good" bikeshops are very hard to find here.
    >
    >

    I will second what Penny has said. You can waste allot of
    money and time trying to dial it in if you do not know what
    you are doing. Forunately I live near enough to a LBS that
    does do fitting very well. I have all my bikes fitted to me.
    It just does not make sense to spend so much time in the
    saddle and not be comfortable and possibly injure yourself
    over time.

    Any and all of the suggestions above can work if that is
    what you need... how may stems will you go through before
    you get it right when all you may need is to adjust your
    seat? Move your seat and you may mess up your knee alignment
    over the BB... too far back and you lose power if your ankle
    is in front of your knee... ect... If you LBS sucks that bad
    drive to one that can help you.

    Good luck,

    -p
     
  18. Tetsuo Shima

    Tetsuo Shima Guest

    "Pippen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s51...
    >
    > "Tetsuo Shima" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Penny S" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > message news:[email protected]...
    > > > Tetsuo Shima wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > I did all the measurements on the site and got the
    > > > > info I require.
    > > >
    > > > You might consider asking around as to which lbs in
    > > > your area does
    > > fittings,
    > > > and who is the "good guy" to talk to for that kind of
    > > > stuff. When I
    got
    > my
    > > > bike, we set it up on a trainer and he eyeballed a few
    > > > things,
    measured
    > a
    > > > few things, tweaked a few things for a really
    > > > excellent fit. He did
    my
    > > > hubby too, and we ended up changing his stem which
    > > > made a significant difference
    > > >
    > > > Penny
    > > >
    > > >
    > > Unfortunately "good" bikeshops are very hard to
    > > find here.
    > >
    > >
    >
    > I will second what Penny has said. You can waste allot of
    > money and time trying to dial it in if you do not know
    > what you are doing. Forunately I live near enough to a
    > LBS that does do fitting very well. I have all my bikes
    > fitted to me. It just does not make sense to spend so
    > much time in
    the
    > saddle and not be comfortable and possibly injure yourself
    > over time.
    >
    > Any and all of the suggestions above can work if that is
    > what you need... how may stems will you go through before
    > you get it right when all you may need is to adjust your
    > seat? Move your seat and you may mess up your knee
    > alignment over the BB... too far back and you lose power
    > if your ankle is
    in
    > front of your knee... ect... If you LBS sucks that bad
    > drive to one that
    can
    > help you.
    >
    > Good luck,
    >
    > -p
    >
    >
    I've done a few alterations which seem to have done the
    trick, there is an instant positive feel from the bike so
    i'll stick with it for now. At least I didn't spend anything
    on extra parts. :)
     
  19. Tetsuo Shima

    Tetsuo Shima Guest

    "Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Tetsuo Shima wrote:
    >
    > > "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:p[email protected]...
    > >
    > >>Sit on your bike in the normal riding position and
    > >>extend your index and middle fingers to rest on the
    > >>levers. There should be (more or less) a straight line
    > >>down your forearms to the tips of your fingers.
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    > > I was told that one a long time ago and always stuck to
    > > it. I do have a ganglion cyst on my righht hand, that
    > > can play up really bad from time
    to
    > > time. As i've said before, I just need to ease the
    > > pressure off, but
    how?
    > >
    > >
    > I have one of those gargoylian cyst too, but on my left
    > wrist. Hurts like a SOB sometimes. Actually, I'm
    > beginning to have problems with my right wrist now. I
    > have a good feeling that it's more computer induced than
    > riding though.
    >
    > My handlebars (risers) are above my saddle, maybe an inch.
    > It's definitely not the norm for just about every other
    > rider I' seen, but that's where I like it. You'll need to
    > experiment a little for find out works for you. Buy some
    > cheap (closeout or even used) different size stems just
    > for a fit test. Once you find one that works for ya, then
    > maybe you can buy the *good* stuff.
    >
    > BTW, my riding buddies (around the same size as me) that
    > always hop on my bike to tool around in the parking
    > lot/trail always comment how much more they like my setup
    > than their own. But then again, that's only for a few
    > minutes.
    >
    > Don't overlook your grips. Very important. I recently
    > switched to Oury Lock-Ons. I like them a lot. There's
    > another dude on this NG that uses these http://www.extrem-
    > esteering.com/Silicone_Grips_Shock_Absorbing.htm I saw
    > them at my LBS, and do look like they're very effective,
    > so that's a possible solution for you.
    >
    > --
    > Slacker
    >
    Thanks, as soon as the site its running again i'll have a
    look. How effective are they?
     
  20. Tetsuo Shima wrote:
    >>
    > I've done a few alterations which seem to have done the
    > trick, there is an instant positive feel from the bike so
    > i'll stick with it for now. At least I didn't spend
    > anything on extra parts. :)

    So tell us what you did?

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
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