"Mountain Days, Bothy Nights"

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Peewiglet, Jan 3, 2005.

  1. Peewiglet

    Peewiglet Guest

    On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 21:21:42 GMT, Roger <[email protected]nospam.zetnet.co.uk>
    wrote:

    [...]
    >> Oooh! I wonder if I should start laying down a few books now for the
    >> Challenge in May?


    >I don't want to disappoint you but books are heavy and if you intend to
    >do any hills on the way across they are best left at home unless you can
    >afford a support party to meet you at every camp.


    What a nice idea....

    >Why not learn a few
    >off by heart and then go over them in your mind. :)


    I can't go without a book - it's unthinkable! :) What I'll probably
    do, though, is carry just one and send the other 2 ahead to my
    re-supply points. I'm planning to send food and possibly maps ahead to
    2 or 3 Post Offices or B&Bs along the way.


    Best wishes,
    --
    ,,
    (**)PeeWiglet~~
    / \ / \ pee AT [guessthisbit].co.uk
     


  2. Peewiglet

    Peewiglet Guest

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 22:29:58 +0000, SteveO wrote:



    >>I've also heard great things about 'One Man's Mountains', by Tom
    >>Patey.

    >
    >Very Definitely worth a read, does concentrate a lot on the climbing
    >side of things.. but then he was a climber ;-) But, and its a
    >significant but, imho, as far as the book's appeal to non-climbers,
    >its a book written about the time in British climbing when everything
    >was new; "modern climbing" was being born... which means that its very
    >much in the mould of "exploring the unknown" and adventures to be had
    >rather than about climbing per se.
    >
    >Tom Patey had an eye for wild places and a love of exploring. Its well
    >worth the read.


    Many thanks - it sounds excellent!



    Best wishes,
    --
    ,,
    (**)PeeWiglet~~
    / \ / \ pee AT [guessthisbit].co.uk
     
  3. Peewiglet

    Peewiglet Guest

    On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 21:26:56 -0000, "Glenn"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >SNIP
    >
    >Possibly another two to consider are Eiger Dreams by Jon Krakauer - a
    >collection of anecdoctal stories on several aspects of mountain life, and
    >Fragile Edge by Maria Coffey, which details the loss of Joe Tasker and Pete
    >Boardman on Everest from the partners perspective, something (as a caver) I
    >failed to appreciate until I read this book.


    Excellent - two more for the list :) Thank you!


    Best wishes,
    --
    ,,
    (**)PeeWiglet~~
    / \ / \ pee AT [guessthisbit].co.uk
     
  4. Judith

    Judith Guest

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 22:29:58 +0000, SteveO wrote:

    >>I've also heard great things about 'One Man's Mountains', by Tom
    >>Patey.

    >
    >Very Definitely worth a read, does concentrate a lot on the climbing
    >side of things.. but then he was a climber ;-)


    For French A-level I had to read a book about two brothers who made
    one last climbing trip.

    I *hated* it but I think that was mainly because my teacher and I
    really did not get on.

    Nowadays I would like to re-read it (in English) as I have a better
    appreciation of the harsh outdoor environment and feel that I would
    probably quite like the book.

    However, I haven't a clue what it was called! It was "La neige ....
    something. En (sounds like) doy?

    Anyone got any idea what I'm talking about?!

    Judith
     
  5. In message <[email protected]>, Peewiglet
    <[email protected]> writes
    >On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 21:07:15 +0000 (UTC), "Alan Wilson"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >[...]
    >>Thought it was pretty average actually. I enjoyed 'Always a little further'
    >>by Alaistair Borthwick much more

    >
    >Many thanks for the tip - I'd not hear of that one, but I'll look it
    >up.
    >

    Always A Little Further is a classic. I've read it a few times.

    I also recommend Hamish's Mountain Walk by Hamish Brown, which tells the
    story of the author's continuous backpacking trip over all the Munros,
    the first time this had been done. It's available in a compendium volume
    with Climbing the Corbetts.
     
  6. Peewiglet

    Peewiglet Guest

  7. Peewiglet

    Peewiglet Guest

    On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 22:51:47 +0000, Chris Townsend
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    [...]
    >Always A Little Further is a classic. I've read it a few times.


    Thank you v. much - it's great to be able to compile a list of really
    good books to look forward to :)
    >
    >I also recommend Hamish's Mountain Walk by Hamish Brown, which tells the
    >story of the author's continuous backpacking trip over all the Munros,
    >the first time this had been done. It's available in a compendium volume
    >with Climbing the Corbetts.


    Ahaa - thanks for that. I've almost bought it a couple of times over
    the last few months, as I've been getting some books on walking in
    Scotland together. It's now on the list :)


    Best wishes,
    --
    ,,
    (**)PeeWiglet~~
    / \ / \ pee AT [guessthisbit].co.uk
     
  8. Judith

    Judith Guest

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 23:05:42 +0000, Peewiglet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >>However, I haven't a clue what it was called! It was "La neige ....
    >>something. En (sounds like) doy?
    >>
    >>Anyone got any idea what I'm talking about?!

    >
    >This one?
    >
    >http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos...79810/sr=1-3/ref=sr_1_0_3/026-7855514-2417231


    Ooo yes! "La neige en deuil" by "Henri Troyat".

    deuil - what a funny word. I'd googled for every spelling I could
    imagine ..... but not that one!

    "The snow in mourning". There's probably a better English way to say
    that, but I've not done any French since 1988!

    I can look for an English translation now. (Reading it in French
    would bring back too many painful memories of school ..... and would
    be entirely pointless, as I can't remember les mot Francais.)

    Danke
    Judith
     
  9. In message <[email protected]>, Peewiglet
    <[email protected]> writes
    >On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 21:21:42 GMT, Roger <[email protected]nospam.zetnet.co.uk>
    >wrote:
    >
    >[...]
    >>> Oooh! I wonder if I should start laying down a few books now for the
    >>> Challenge in May?

    >
    >>I don't want to disappoint you but books are heavy and if you intend to
    >>do any hills on the way across they are best left at home


    I always carry a book or two. Books do vary in weight though so it's
    worth getting small light paperbacks. I often buy second-hand ones and
    then leave them in bothies for others to read.

    >> unless you can
    >>afford a support party to meet you at every camp.

    >
    >What a nice idea....
    >
    >>Why not learn a few
    >>off by heart and then go over them in your mind. :)

    >
    >I can't go without a book - it's unthinkable! :) What I'll probably
    >do, though, is carry just one and send the other 2 ahead to my
    >re-supply points. I'm planning to send food and possibly maps ahead to
    >2 or 3 Post Offices or B&Bs along the way.


    That's what I usually do. It can be interesting to buy books along the
    way though. You never know what you'll find (sometimes nothing of course
    so it is risky). Blair Atholl has a good second-hand book shop. It was
    on my Challenge route last year.
     
  10. Darren G

    Darren G Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > In message <[email protected]>, Peewiglet
    > <[email protected]> writes
    > >On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 21:07:15 +0000 (UTC), "Alan Wilson"
    > ><[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >[...]
    > >>Thought it was pretty average actually. I enjoyed 'Always a little further'
    > >>by Alaistair Borthwick much more

    > >
    > >Many thanks for the tip - I'd not hear of that one, but I'll look it
    > >up.
    > >

    > Always A Little Further is a classic. I've read it a few times.


    believe it is out of print now? or at least it was when I looked for it
    a while ago.

    --
    Darren
    mail to darren not ng
     
  11. Peewiglet

    Peewiglet Guest

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 23:12:36 +0000, Judith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    [...]
    >>This one?
    >>
    >>http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos...79810/sr=1-3/ref=sr_1_0_3/026-7855514-2417231

    >
    >Ooo yes! "La neige en deuil" by "Henri Troyat".


    Tres bon! :)
    >
    >deuil - what a funny word. I'd googled for every spelling I could
    >imagine ..... but not that one!


    Unpronounceable, istm.
    >
    >"The snow in mourning". There's probably a better English way to say
    >that, but I've not done any French since 1988!
    >
    >I can look for an English translation now. (Reading it in French
    >would bring back too many painful memories of school ..... and would
    >be entirely pointless, as I can't remember les mot Francais.)


    Nor moi! :)
    >
    >Danke


    You're velcome!



    Best wishes,
    --
    ,,
    (**)PeeWiglet~~
    / \ / \ pee AT [guessthisbit].co.uk
     
  12. Peewiglet

    Peewiglet Guest

    On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 23:12:44 +0000, Chris Townsend
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    [...]
    >That's what I usually do. It can be interesting to buy books along the
    >way though. You never know what you'll find (sometimes nothing of course
    >so it is risky).


    Yup. I once found myself unable to get any sort of book at all when
    camping in the Lakes for a few nights, so now I always take something
    just in case.

    >Blair Atholl has a good second-hand book shop. It was
    >on my Challenge route last year.


    Many thanks for the tip! :)


    <fx: trots off to Anquet to search for Blair Atholl>



    Best wishes,
    --
    ,,
    (**)PeeWiglet~~
    / \ / \ pee AT [guessthisbit].co.uk
     
  13. Rooney

    Rooney Guest

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 23:12:36 +0000, Judith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 23:05:42 +0000, Peewiglet <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>>However, I haven't a clue what it was called! It was "La neige ....
    >>>something. En (sounds like) doy?
    >>>
    >>>Anyone got any idea what I'm talking about?!

    >>
    >>This one?
    >>
    >>http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos...79810/sr=1-3/ref=sr_1_0_3/026-7855514-2417231

    >
    >Ooo yes! "La neige en deuil" by "Henri Troyat".
    >


    I did that one too!

    --

    R
    o
    o
    n
    e
    y
     
  14. Nick Pedley

    Nick Pedley Guest

    "Peewiglet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 21:26:56 -0000, "Glenn"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >SNIP
    > >
    > >Possibly another two to consider are ......

    >
    > Excellent - two more for the list :) Thank you!
    >
    >

    More about exploring abroad but nice to read is 'Something Lost Behind the
    Ranges' by John Blashford-Snell, the chap who started the Operation Raleigh
    trips. It covers his time travelling the length of the Blue Nile and
    exploring jungles worlwide amd his life story in general.
    Found this in my library a few years back, might be out of print today.

    Nick
     
  15. SteveO

    SteveO Guest

    On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 23:05:42 +0000, Peewiglet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 22:45:42 +0000, Judith
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >[...]
    >>However, I haven't a clue what it was called! It was "La neige ....
    >>something. En (sounds like) doy?
    >>
    >>Anyone got any idea what I'm talking about?!

    >
    >This one?
    >
    >http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos...79810/sr=1-3/ref=sr_1_0_3/026-7855514-2417231



    WHOA!! we are a sharp l'il piglet, so on the ball... we bin taking our
    vitmins?







    SteveO
    --
    NE Climbers & walkers chat forum;
    http://www.thenmc.org.uk/phpBB2/index.php

    NMC website: http://www.thenmc.org.uk
     
  16. Leonard Trim

    Leonard Trim Guest

    As Chris mentions Hamish Brown's 'Mountain Walk' can I just mention two
    things. Hamish's solution to carrying paperbacks was to leave them
    behind in bothies when he had finished with them. This cuts down weight
    and is very pleasant for those who discover something worth reading. I
    well remember finding 'Lord of the Rings' in Shenavall in 1974. Great
    for a wet day and night. Again regarding Hamish Brown can I put in a
    word, our club is putting on a lecture/slide show featuring Hamish
    himself on the twentieth of this month. He is talking on walking in the
    Atlas Mountains. Venue, the Pitbauchlie House Hotel, Dunfermline, 20th
    January, 7.30, £3.

    --
    Len Trim
    [email protected]
     
  17. How are you getting it from Amazon? I can only see new and used ones
    that will be shipped from the US. The price varies hugely too (£4 to
    over £20).
     
  18. Duncan Gray

    Duncan Gray Guest

    "Darren G" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    > > In message <[email protected]>, Peewiglet
    > > <[email protected]> writes
    > > >On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 21:07:15 +0000 (UTC), "Alan Wilson"
    > > ><[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >[...]
    > > >>Thought it was pretty average actually. I enjoyed 'Always a little

    further'
    > > >>by Alaistair Borthwick much more
    > > >
    > > >Many thanks for the tip - I'd not hear of that one, but I'll look it
    > > >up.
    > > >

    > > Always A Little Further is a classic. I've read it a few times.

    >
    > believe it is out of print now? or at least it was when I looked for it
    > a while ago.
    >


    I got a copy in an outdoors shop not that long ago. Checking the details it
    seems to be a 1993 print.

    --
    Duncan Gray

    www.duncolm.co.uk
    also The Mountaineering Council of Scotland
    www.mountaineering-scotland.org.uk
     
  19. Peewiglet

    Peewiglet Guest

    On 5 Jan 2005 02:20:00 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    >How are you getting it from Amazon? I can only see new and used ones
    >that will be shipped from the US. The price varies hugely too (£4 to
    >over £20).


    Hi there,

    The vendor I ordered it from ("theoldbookshelf") is no longer listed
    as having one of those books for sale, hopefully because he's sent it
    to me now :) It was described as new, and I paid £3.99 for the book
    plus £2.75 P&P. I can't quite remember, but I don't think it's coming
    from the States.

    I've actually had v. good experiences (so far - fingers crossed)
    buying from the 'Used & New' book vendors listed on Amazon. I've also
    had good experiences buying (books and music related stuff) from North
    America, via Amazon and Ebay and otherwise.

    The important thing, istm, is to read the feedback carefully before
    deciding to buy. There's always a chance that they're listing stuff
    they've not actually got (either because they've already sold it, or
    because they only order on receiving an order themselves), which
    drives me mad... I've not had that unfortunate experience often,
    though, largely (I think) because I choose vendors carefully.

    Good luck!



    Best wishes,
    --
    ,,
    (**)PeeWiglet~~
    / \ / \
     
  20. In message <[email protected]>, Peewiglet
    <[email protected]> writes
    >On 5 Jan 2005 02:20:00 -0800, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >>How are you getting it from Amazon? I can only see new and used ones
    >>that will be shipped from the US. The price varies hugely too (£4 to
    >>over £20).

    >
    >Hi there,
    >
    >The vendor I ordered it from ("theoldbookshelf") is no longer listed
    >as having one of those books for sale, hopefully because he's sent it
    >to me now :) It was described as new, and I paid £3.99 for the book
    >plus £2.75 P&P. I can't quite remember, but I don't think it's coming
    >from the States.
    >
    >I've actually had v. good experiences (so far - fingers crossed)
    >buying from the 'Used & New' book vendors listed on Amazon. I've also
    >had good experiences buying (books and music related stuff) from North
    >America, via Amazon and Ebay and otherwise.


    I fine abebooks very good - http://www.abebooks.com.
     
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