Mountain Training

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by xiaochou, Aug 29, 2004.

  1. xiaochou

    xiaochou New Member

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    Hello All,
    This is actually the recycled version of another thread that has not been responded to.:mad: Maybe I'll get a better response here?!
    My scenario is this: I'm beginning to train for a bike race called the Iron Horse Classic in Colorado. It runs from Durango to Silverton, covers about 47 miles and 5,000 plus feet in vertical climb, and takes place in late Spring.
    I'm curious as to what any of you might suggest regarding training over the winter, how often hills should be involved in my training, etc. Any advice would be appreciated.
    I'm also trekking around on a mountain bike still. I go about 12-21 miles 4 times a week, average 17mph (sorry, no wattage results...can't afford a meter) and am looking for a bike. Any suggestions for a bike capable of handling a 200 lb. man around the hills? I'm concerned about flex/stiffness/etc. I know a bike that fits is most important, but within that assumption what might any of you recommend?
     
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  2. keydates

    keydates New Member

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    Don't go for the super-light bikes.

    17 mph is pretty good for riding a mountain bike (even if you basically are riding in the flats).

    As for training, I don't know. I'm not really good at training instructions.
     
  3. xiaochou

    xiaochou New Member

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    Why would you steer clear of the super-lights?? Just curious.
     
  4. keydates

    keydates New Member

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    Actually, not sure. However, super light bikes tend to have light wheels, which aren't as capable in taking a relatively heavy person like yourself. You may have problems with spokes breaking often, or, in extreme cases, the wheel might actually deform a bit.
     
  5. xiaochou

    xiaochou New Member

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    Thanks for the tip...I'll keep it in mind. :)
     
  6. daviddobedoe

    daviddobedoe New Member

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    My thoughts would be to build up to riding the distance/height gain first. I would suggest trying to get to the point where you can do this at 70% of your heart rate range. A good example would be to work out a circuit with similar hills in it to the race, try and ride it at below 70%, it might feel quite slow but keep below the 70% ride it several times eventually you'll find that your getting up the climbs with this effort and your going faster and getting fitter almost effortlessly. You might allready be there? When you know your riding this the job to do is to start working towards riding faster. Your base fitness is ready for speed work. If the climbs are steep don't be surprised if you take a few weeks, to be able to do this.(I did this in the mountains near me and the circuit took 12 weeks to be able to do at below 70% on the climbs but I know that I'm fitter than when I started.) What you might do next will depend on what you want to achive and the conditions you have to train in. Ideas would include, longer rides, riding up hills, doing intervals on hills, turbo sessions aimed at lactate threshold, work on improveing your descending skills and possibly a bit of running over the winter especially when the winter makes riding dangerous.

    I would try and do this ride once or twice a week and any other rides should be easier./shorter. Remember that as far as training is concerned you get fitter when your resting, the training stimulates this. Don't forget to get out and have fun its not all about training. If you need to loose some weight look at your diet the extra pounds are going to count on the climbs. Go get yourself a nice road bike, in my experience (and I'm quite small!) the strongest wheels are high quality handbuilts, get some good clothing for training in cold weather and have fun.
     
  7. xiaochou

    xiaochou New Member

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    That seems to be sound advice. Thank you.
    Looks like a trip to the hills is the plan and yes, I plan on taking it easy at first and building up. When I first started riding (only less than two months ago) I tried to bump up my mileage too fast and had to take a few days off due to fatigue. I'm already learning that rest is very VERY important and that I don't have to go all-out every time I ride.
    I think my next step might be to try and find somebody about my level or just a bit better to ride with on occasion.
     
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