Mountain versus road bike

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Mike L, May 28, 2003.

  1. Mike L

    Mike L Guest

    I'm training for my first tri in July. I'm currently making about 16mph on my Trek 4300 with
    semi-slicks (I've only been biking a few weeks). I want to do about 18mph for my goal time. I was
    thinking of just putting on some road tyres for the race, but was wondering how much more time/speed
    I might pick up if I actually rented a road bike. Anybody informed opinions about this?

    Thanks. Mike L
     
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  2. Broooz

    Broooz Guest

    "Mike L" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm training for my first tri in July. I'm currently making about 16mph on
    my
    > Trek 4300 with semi-slicks (I've only been biking a few weeks). I want to
    do
    > about 18mph for my goal time. I was thinking of just putting on some road tyres for the race, but
    > was wondering how much more time/speed I might
    pick up
    > if I actually rented a road bike. Anybody informed opinions about this?

    I'm similar to you - training for first tri, started using MB with slicks. Have just bought a road
    bike and the difference is fantastic - so much faster especially on the aero bars. Also, I was
    finding MB in a streamlined position hard work on the arms. Definitely worth renting or borrowing or
    even buying. The longer the race, the greater the benefit of course.
     
  3. Mike L

    Mike L Guest

    Did you ever try slicks on your MB?

    In article <[email protected]>, "Broooz" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm similar to you - training for first tri, started using MB with slicks. Have just bought a road
    >bike and the difference is fantastic - so much faster especially on the aero bars. Also, I was
    >finding MB in a streamlined position hard work on the arms. Definitely worth renting or borrowing
    >or even buying. The longer the race, the greater the benefit of course.
     
  4. Cam Wilson

    Cam Wilson Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    (Mike L) wrote:

    > I'm training for my first tri in July. I'm currently making about 16mph on my Trek 4300 with
    > semi-slicks (I've only been biking a few weeks). I want to do about 18mph for my goal time. I was
    > thinking of just putting on some road tyres for the race, but was wondering how much more
    > time/speed I might pick up if I actually rented a road bike. Anybody informed opinions about this?
    >
    > Thanks. Mike L

    hi Mike,

    i know that a road bike will be faster for you, but if you opt to stick with your mountain bike, you
    can improve things with slicks. i rode my first tri on a mountain-road hybrid (sorta)... more of a
    road bike in a mountain bike style. i put slicks on it, some upright handlebar ends to provide at
    least some variation in hand positions while riding/tucking, and stripped off the unnecessary junk,
    like kickstand, etc. by race day, it nearly looked like a racing bike!

    it just depends what your goal is for your first tri... just to finish and have fun, or to really
    seriously burn up the roads. i was somewhere in between. after your first tri or two, you/I can
    consider another faster bike.

    Cam
     
  5. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    [email protected] (Mike L) wrote:

    >I'm training for my first tri in July. I'm currently making about 16mph on my Trek 4300 with
    >semi-slicks (I've only been biking a few weeks). I want to do about 18mph for my goal time. I was
    >thinking of just putting on some road tyres for the race, but was wondering how much more
    >time/speed I might pick up if I actually rented a road bike. Anybody informed opinions about this?

    The answer depends on a lot of variables. I did a tough 40km time trial on a MTB once, and was
    probably only ~1.5mph (2km/h) slower than I would have been on my time trial bike. But I DID
    have some pretty "hot" MTB wheels (deep rims, 18/24 skinny spokes) - but the event organizers
    insisted on only flat bars with bar ends (so I had to leave my beloved Scott AT4-Pro
    multiposition bars at home).

    I'd say realistically without special wheels, you could expect to increase your speed about 1mph /
    1.6km/h when switching from a MTB with slicks to a road bike - assuming you can get into a
    reasonably stretched out position on the MTB, of course.

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  6. Theodor Seiz

    Theodor Seiz Guest

    I wouldnt buy slicks. If this is your first tri than finishing should be your only goal. You can
    finish on freeride tyres if you really want to. If you stay with triathlon and speed gets an issue,
    you will need a dedicated road and later triathlon bike. Your speed goals are no good idea either.
    For your first race concentrate on perceived effort and fun - not on times. What will you do if its
    a terribly hot race and you finish at 17mph feeling great? Be sad because you failed?

    The slicks are only wast of money and show a wrong focus. Upgrading your mountainbike is simply a
    waste of time, effort and money. Use it to finish you first tris and if you stay with triathlon
    buy a "real" bike. Than you mountainbike will be a great training tool and you will never need
    slicks on it.

    Just my opinion...
     
  7. Mike L

    Mike L Guest

    I was kind of leaning this way myself. The ride is decent on my continetal semis. On the other hand,
    it is only $55 to change them up to slicks, so even a 1mph "free" gain might be worth that much....
    Thanks very much for your feedback.

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Theodor Seiz) wrote:
    >I wouldnt buy slicks. If this is your first tri than finishing should be your only goal. You can
    >finish on freeride tyres if you really want to. If you stay with triathlon and speed gets an issue,
    >you will need a dedicated road and later triathlon bike. Your speed goals are no good idea either.
    >For your first race concentrate on perceived effort and fun - not on times. What will you do if its
    >a terribly hot race and you finish at 17mph feeling great? Be sad because you failed?
    >
    >
    >The slicks are only wast of money and show a wrong focus. Upgrading your mountainbike is simply a
    >waste of time, effort and money. Use it to finish you first tris and if you stay with triathlon
    >buy a "real" bike. Than you mountainbike will be a great training tool and you will never need
    >slicks on it.
    >
    >Just my opinion...
     
  8. Mike L

    Mike L Guest

    Thanks Mark. Appreciate the info. In article <[email protected]>, Mark
    Hickey <[email protected]> wrote:
    >The answer depends on a lot of variables. I did a tough 40km time trial on a MTB once, and was
    >probably only ~1.5mph (2km/h) slower than I would have been on my time trial bike. But I DID
    >have some pretty "hot" MTB wheels (deep rims, 18/24 skinny spokes) - but the event organizers
    >insisted on only flat bars with bar ends (so I had to leave my beloved Scott AT4-Pro
    >multiposition bars at home).
    >
    >I'd say realistically without special wheels, you could expect to increase your speed about 1mph /
    >1.6km/h when switching from a MTB with slicks to a road bike - assuming you can get into a
    >reasonably stretched out position on the MTB, of course.
    >
    >Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  9. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    [email protected] (Mike L) wrote:

    >I was kind of leaning this way myself. The ride is decent on my continetal semis. On the other
    >hand, it is only $55 to change them up to slicks, so even a 1mph "free" gain might be worth that
    >much.... Thanks very much for your feedback.

    You won't have to spend that much. There are some very nice slick MTB tires out there to be had for
    less than that (if you can find 'em). Tires like the Panaracer Pasela or High Road, Ritchey Tom
    Slick, and Tioga City Slicker.

    Having a set of slicks for your MTB makes it a very versatile "city bike" (and it's always fun to
    chase other riders on road bikes).

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame

    >In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Theodor Seiz) wrote:
    >>I wouldnt buy slicks. If this is your first tri than finishing should be your only goal. You can
    >>finish on freeride tyres if you really want to. If you stay with triathlon and speed gets an
    >>issue, you will need a dedicated road and later triathlon bike. Your speed goals are no good idea
    >>either. For your first race concentrate on perceived effort and fun - not on times. What will you
    >>do if its a terribly hot race and you finish at 17mph feeling great? Be sad because you failed?
    >>
    >>
    >>The slicks are only wast of money and show a wrong focus. Upgrading your mountainbike is simply a
    >>waste of time, effort and money. Use it to finish you first tris and if you stay with triathlon
    >>buy a "real" bike. Than you mountainbike will be a great training tool and you will never need
    >>slicks on it.
    >>
    >>Just my opinion...
     
  10. Mike L

    Mike L Guest

    It's actually $55 cdn, that's like $10 US or something....<g>

    In article <[email protected]>, Mark Hickey <[email protected]> wrote:

    >You won't have to spend that much. There are some very nice slick MTB tires out there to be had for
    >less than that (if you can find 'em). Tires like the Panaracer Pasela or High Road, Ritchey Tom
    >Slick, and Tioga City Slicker.
    >
    >Having a set of slicks for your MTB makes it a very versatile "city bike" (and it's always fun to
    >chase other riders on road bikes).
    >
    >Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Theodor Seiz) wrote:
    >>>I wouldnt buy slicks. If this is your first tri than finishing should be your only goal. You can
    >>>finish on freeride tyres if you really want to. If you stay with triathlon and speed gets an
    >>>issue, you will need a dedicated road and later triathlon bike. Your speed goals are no good idea
    >>>either. For your first race concentrate on perceived effort and fun - not on times. What will you
    >>>do if its a terribly hot race and you finish at 17mph feeling great? Be sad because you failed?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>The slicks are only wast of money and show a wrong focus. Upgrading your mountainbike is simply a
    >>>waste of time, effort and money. Use it to finish you first tris and if you stay with triathlon
    >>>buy a "real" bike. Than you mountainbike will be a great training tool and you will never need
    >>>slicks on it.
    >>>
    >>>Just my opinion...
     
  11. Broooz

    Broooz Guest

    Yes but I still find the road bike easier to ride - getting streamlined is so much easier. Not worth
    spending the money though until you have made up your mind.

    "Mike L" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Did you ever try slicks on your MB?
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>, "Broooz" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I'm similar to you - training for first tri, started using MB with
    slicks.
    > >Have just bought a road bike and the difference is fantastic - so much faster especially on the
    > >aero bars. Also, I was finding MB in a
    streamlined
    > >position hard work on the arms. Definitely worth renting or borrowing or even buying. The longer
    > >the race, the greater the benefit of course.
    > >
     
  12. Cam Wilson

    Cam Wilson Guest

    > In article <[email protected]>, Mark Hickey <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >You won't have to spend that much. There are some very nice slick MTB tires out there to be had
    > >for less than that (if you can find 'em). Tires like the Panaracer Pasela or High Road, Ritchey
    > >Tom Slick, and Tioga City Slicker.
    > >
    > >Having a set of slicks for your MTB makes it a very versatile "city bike" (and it's always fun to
    > >chase other riders on road bikes).
    > >
    > >Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame

    hey, i passed plenty of people on road bikes with my mtb with slicks... in my recent, first tri. i
    think that in some cases, it less about the bike and more about the person ON the bike. i was really
    into the race, while some folks were just piddling about or having trouble using the gears
    correctly.

    just my 2 cents,

    Cam
     
  13. "Broooz" <[email protected]> wrote in news:D[email protected]:

    > "Mike L" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> I'm training for my first tri in July. I'm currently making about 16mph on
    > my
    >> Trek 4300 with semi-slicks (I've only been biking a few weeks). I want to
    > do
    >> about 18mph for my goal time. I was thinking of just putting on some road tyres for the race, but
    >> was wondering how much more time/speed I might
    > pick up
    >> if I actually rented a road bike. Anybody informed opinions about this?
    >
    > I'm similar to you - training for first tri, started using MB with slicks. Have just bought a road
    > bike and the difference is fantastic - so much faster especially on the aero bars. Also, I was
    > finding MB in a streamlined position hard work on the arms. Definitely worth renting or borrowing
    > or even buying. The longer the race, the greater the benefit of course.
    >
    >

    I wouldn't recommend renting a bike just for the race. Never change anything on race day. If you're
    going to race on a rented bike, train on the EXACT same rented bike.
     
  14. Theodor Seiz

    Theodor Seiz Guest

    1mph on rolling resistance? Not realisitic, your position and aero resistance stays the same and
    that accounts for more than 80% of total resistance (with mechanic resistance being second and
    rolling resistance only 5%).
     
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