Mounting pannier racks on bike with no eyelets

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by thomas_cho, Feb 10, 2006.

  1. thomas_cho

    thomas_cho New Member

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    Hi all,
    I am toying with the idea of mounting a rack on a road bike frame (still looking for the frame) and setting it up for a commute bike.

    I took a look at my Giant OCR composite, and realised that it did not have any eyelets on which to mount racks.

    I know there are seatpost mount pannier racks, but they hardly seem tough enuf for me. I read on some posts that there are pannier racks which mount to the rear axle of the bike. Are there adaptors around which allow one to do that?

    I came across the old man mountain racks which were designed for bikes without the eyelets, but these apparently cost $200.

    What about adaptors for the stablizer attachements?

    Thanks
     
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  2. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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  3. robalert

    robalert New Member

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    i agree, tho, delta has some racks that fit to the seatpost and QR skewers

    shame to see such a beaut bike with racks....

    it'll be like fitting a towbar to a ferrari enzo or aston martin DB9
     
  4. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    Do not fit a rack to a carbon seatpost or Ti skewer. :eek:
     
  5. thomas_cho

    thomas_cho New Member

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    So if I cant mount a pannier rack to bikes without mounting eyelets, whats the next best alternative? Backpack? Or get a regular seatpost, and use a seatpost mount?

    What are some of your experiences with a seatpost mount rack? I only intend to carry clothes.

    Thing is I am thinking of starting a bike build project, ie. get a nice used road bike frame from ebay or similar sites, and built a commute bike based on that. I couldnt handle rock chips or accidents marring the finish on my OCR composite.
     
  6. cycleski

    cycleski New Member

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    Thomas ebay is fine if the bike can be collected, paying for post can spoil the deal though, if you have annual council collection of household items the number of older little used bikes available would supprise. I collected one that still had the original tyres on it ! and for the cost of a new chain rides very well, has mount points, down side is the steel rims but cheap wheels (http://www.cellbikes.com.au/category.php?id=12 ) may solve that.
    Suggest that nice frame with rack mounts is steel, alloy and point loads dont seem a good combination to me 2c. Distance between rear drop outs may limit options as well if the frame is too old, ie not 130mm.
    Wearing a back pak is a pain on a hot day and seems to generate more windage and energy loss, some handlebar mounted soft clip on bags may be an option if its light clothes to be carried.
     
  7. thomas_cho

    thomas_cho New Member

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    A new bike might well avoid all these issues!
     
  8. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    Good thought Thomas. What size bike are you?
     
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