mouth/teeth guards while MTB

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Billy, Jun 18, 2003.

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  1. Billy

    Billy Guest

    There is always the potential to fall/wipe-out in spectacular ways while mountain biking. I've been
    thinking lately, whether I should wear a mouth guard, while mountain biking. I'm talking about those
    ones that fit in your mouth that go around your teeth, like the hockey players use.

    Do the pro mountain bikers ever use protective equipment like that? I guess it might get in the way
    of breathing and drinking. Anybody ever had an accident knocking out teeth or biting their tongue?

    Just thought I'd get some ideas and start some discussion. Bill.
     
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  2. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Billy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > There is always the potential to fall/wipe-out in spectacular ways while mountain biking. I've
    > been thinking lately, whether I should wear a mouth guard, while mountain biking. I'm talking
    > about those ones that fit in your mouth that go around your teeth, like the hockey players use.

    I've been mountain biking for 15 years, and never had a spectacular crash. I've had a lot of minor
    spills, but I've never been hurt beyond minor scrapes and bruises. If you're crashing badly a lot,
    you're doing something wrong.

    Furthermore, crashing in the wilderness is foolish, and a burden on those who come to your aid. So
    it's selfish too.

    If you're talking about MTV-style stunt riding and jumping, that's another sport entirely. Pay no
    mind to what you see in the media. It has little to do with real mountain biking.

    > Do the pro mountain bikers ever use protective equipment like that? I guess it might get in the
    > way of breathing and drinking.

    Yup. And crashing sure gets in the way of winning races.

    > Anybody ever had an accident knocking out teeth or biting their tongue?

    This is more likely to happen while road biking, hitting the pavement face first at speed. All of my
    bad crashes have been on the road, and others I know as well.

    Off-road speeds tend to be a lot lower, and surfaces more forgiving. Dirt can hurt, but pavement
    almost always hurts worse.

    Matt O.
     
  3. Van Bagnol

    Van Bagnol Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Billy) wrote:

    > There is always the potential to fall/wipe-out in spectacular ways while mountain biking. I've
    > been thinking lately, whether I should wear a mouth guard, while mountain biking. I'm talking
    > about those ones that fit in your mouth that go around your teeth, like the hockey players use.
    >
    > Do the pro mountain bikers ever use protective equipment like that? I guess it might get in
    > the way of breathing and drinking. Anybody ever had an accident knocking out teeth or biting
    > their tongue?

    Most tooth protection I've seen was by full-face helmets like the Gyro Switchblade or ones by Troy
    Lee, Answer or Azonic.

    I wouldn't think a mouthguard would work well for breathing and hydration, although boxers somehow
    manage. Boxing, however, is a highly anaerobic activity compared to cycling, even XC mountain
    biking, though perhaps downhill/dual slalom is primarily anaerobic.

    Van

    --
    Van Bagnol / v a n at wco dot com / c r l at bagnol dot com ...enjoys - Theatre / Windsurfing /
    Skydiving / Mountain Biking ...feels - "Parang lumalakad ako sa loob ng paniginip" ...thinks - "An
    Error is Not a Mistake ... Unless You Refuse to Correct It"
     
  4. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Billy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > There is always the potential to fall/wipe-out in spectacular ways while mountain biking. I've
    > been thinking lately, whether I should wear a mouth guard, while mountain biking. I'm talking
    > about those ones that fit in your mouth that go around your teeth, like the hockey players use.
    >
    > Do the pro mountain bikers ever use protective equipment like that? I guess it might get in
    > the way of breathing and drinking. Anybody ever had an accident knocking out teeth or biting
    > their tongue?

    It's a good question. Facial injuries from cycling are not that uncommon, and can be severe, like
    head injuries. Unfortunately, no one has come up with any practical means of protection that I know
    of. It's kind of like the whole helmet debate, there's the question of risk/need, then that of
    effectiveness and practicality, not an easy matter to settle.

    I have never "face planted" mountain or road biking, but I can see where it is certainly possible. I
    have broken ribs (twice) and suffered fairly bad contusions mountain biking, and have seen other,
    more serious, injuries among the people I ride with. I did face plant once skiing, and managed to
    shear off half a molar when my jaw struck the (icy) ground.
     
  5. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    ...

    > I wouldn't think a mouthguard would work well for breathing and hydration, although boxers somehow
    > manage. Boxing, however, is a highly anaerobic activity compared to cycling, even XC mountain
    > biking, though perhaps downhill/dual slalom is primarily anaerobic.

    Boxers, however, pull out their mouthguards between rounds when they are getting a drink. Football
    players might be a better comparison; they can drink with the mouthguards in, no problem.

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  6. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    ...

    > I have never "face planted" mountain or road biking, but I can see where it is certainly possible.
    > I have broken ribs (twice) and suffered fairly bad contusions mountain biking, and have seen
    > other, more serious, injuries among the people I ride with. I did face plant once skiing, and
    > managed to shear off half a molar when my jaw struck the (icy) ground.

    The worst I've gotten from a face plant while skiing is a sore neck, but it reminded me that it
    could have been MUCH worse! Luckily I've never had a face plant from a bike.

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, ns_archer1960 @ns_hotmail.com says...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > ...
    >
    > > I wouldn't think a mouthguard would work well for breathing and hydration, although boxers
    > > somehow manage. Boxing, however, is a highly anaerobic activity compared to cycling, even XC
    > > mountain biking, though perhaps downhill/dual slalom is primarily anaerobic.
    >
    > Boxers, however, pull out their mouthguards between rounds when they are getting a drink. Football
    > players might be a better comparison; they can drink with the mouthguards in, no problem.
    >
    >

    They can spit them out because it's tied to their helmet.
    --
    _________________________
    Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
  8. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > In article <[email protected]>, ns_archer1960

    ...

    > > Boxers, however, pull out their mouthguards between rounds when they are getting a drink.
    > > Football players might be a better comparison; they can drink with the mouthguards in, no
    > > problem.
    > >
    > >
    >
    > They can spit them out because it's tied to their helmet.

    Even though I could, I seldom did, and if you watch the NFL, you'll see that many of them take their
    drink with their mouthguard still in their mouth.

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  9. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in message

    > Even though I could, I seldom did, and if you watch the NFL, you'll see that many of them take
    > their drink with their mouthguard still in their mouth.

    We always used double mouthguards in martial arts. They are designed with a slit to enable
    breathing, but it might be wide enough for drinking if you are careful. Although this isn't the
    brand I used, this link provides a good look at what I'm talking about:
    http://www.4martialartssupplies.com/mpguard.html

    -Buck
     
  10. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Buck" <j u n k m a i l @ g a l a x y c o r
    p . c o m> says...
    > "archer" <[email protected]_hotmail.com> wrote in message
    >
    > > Even though I could, I seldom did, and if you watch the NFL, you'll see that many of them take
    > > their drink with their mouthguard still in their mouth.
    >
    > We always used double mouthguards in martial arts. They are designed with a slit to enable
    > breathing, but it might be wide enough for drinking if you are careful. Although this isn't the
    > brand I used, this link provides a good look at what I'm talking about:
    > http://www.4martialartssupplies.com/mpguard.html

    Now I see where you're coming from. In football and boxing, most people use single-sided mouth
    guards (top only), which allow you to drink, talk (sort of), etc. I can see how that might be a
    problem with the double- sided ones you are used to.

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  11. As a road biker, I don't really know the applicability for mtbing, but as a dentist my suggestion
    would be that the one size fits all or boil and bite moutguards are not very effective and difficult
    to use. Most dentists would be able to fabricate a custom made mouthguard that fits over the top
    teeth and stays on by itself so you don't have to clench your teeth together to prevent it from
    falling out. It would make breathing(something I strongly encourage my patients to do regularly) and
    drinking from a waterbottle easy compared to the other types. Len Diamond

    Billy wrote:

    > There is always the potential to fall/wipe-out in spectacular ways while mountain biking. I've
    > been thinking lately, whether I should wear a mouth guard, while mountain biking. I'm talking
    > about those ones that fit in your mouth that go around your teeth, like the hockey players use.
    >
    > Do the pro mountain bikers ever use protective equipment like that? I guess it might get in
    > the way of breathing and drinking. Anybody ever had an accident knocking out teeth or biting
    > their tongue?
    >
    > Just thought I'd get some ideas and start some discussion. Bill.
     
  12. Brink

    Brink Guest

    I am also a dentist. I have used a professional mouthguard for years playing basketball. I never
    take it out and i play at very aerobic level. You can easily bike with a dentist fabricated mouth
    guard. The most common sports related cause of chipped teeth is from biking. The large majority of
    these injuries are from children. I do not know how common it is for adults to chip teeth while
    biking. I personally do not use a mouth guard for biking, but i really don't think it would restrict
    my riding at all. You really just forget that they are in your mouth if properly made. Matt
     
  13. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > As a road biker, I don't really know the applicability for mtbing, but as a dentist my suggestion
    > would be that the one size fits all or boil and bite moutguards are not very effective and
    > difficult to use. Most dentists

    I used the boil-to-fit mouthguards for football for many years, and never had a problem getting
    them to stay in place, and I never had any problem talking intelligebly (sp?) or drinking water
    with it in.

    ....

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
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