Moving from Mountain Bike to something more comfortable.

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by Xa3phod, May 5, 2014.

  1. Xa3phod

    Xa3phod New Member

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    Hi. I have a Specialized Hardrock and although its a fine bike, I don't do much off roading anymore. I would prefer something extremely comfortable for long rides in the city. Only real factor is that I am 6'5" and 225. I need a extra large bike, and one that has at least 27 years, front suspension, and do I need disk brakes? I would prefer to stay under $1000. Any advice?
     
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  2. AyeYo

    AyeYo Member

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    If you're doing long, urban rides... what makes you feel that you need 27 gears and suspension?

    Here's a 24 speed with front suspension and seat suspension that has a ridiculously upright riding position and massive, cushy seat. You'll be going very slow on this, but I don't think you'll find something more comfortable. The measurements on the 21" size look plenty large.

    http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/town/recreation/shift_comfort/shift_3/#
     
  3. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FYI. YOU can fit a wheelset with 700c ROAD tires (e.g., 700x28-32) in 99% of the MTB frames/forks ...

    When disc brakes had finally reached critical mass (must have been about a dozen-or-so years ago), MAVIC introduced a "city" wheelset specifically so MTB riders could use their MTB more efficiently when not riding off-the-road ...

    'I' was subsequently motivated to lace a pair of Road rims to a pair of XT disc hubs!!!
    [​IMG]
    BUT WAIT!

    YOU don't have to DIY ...

    BECAUSE 29er bikes use 700c wheels.

    So, YOU just need to EITHER buy an off-the-peg wheelset OR you simply need to lace up a set of 700c rims onto your existing hubs (or, have someone else build the wheelset for you).

    • the price will vary from under $200 to your $1000 limit ...

    IF your Hardrock does not have disc brakes and/or disc brake mounts then you can retrofit your bike with rim brakes intended for a Road bike ...

    These are two of my MTB frames which were designed to use 26" wheels which I re-fit with Road forks + 700c Road wheels + tires ...
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    • YOU do/(will) not need to change the fork on your Hardrock ... a Road fork makes the head tube angle steeper (closer to what you would find on a typical Road bike)
    • and, trims some weight off the bike, too!
    [*]YOU will have to measure the distance between the theoretical fender/(brake) mounting hole and the rim to use Road calipers
    • the forward facing hole of the "fender" mounting hole was enlarged to accept a recessed brake nut
    [*]Of course, you do NOT have to install Drop handlebars unless you want to.
    • if THAT is the case, then opt for Campagnolo shifters (as pictured)
    • SRAM & SHIMANO shifters may also require a wholesale exchange of the derailleurs
     
  4. Xa3phod

    Xa3phod New Member

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    The problem with the bike is the riding position. I have added a high riser and adjustable stem, and a comfy seat. Its still not comfortable. I have to put to much weight on my arms. Perhaps its the geometry of the frame itself? Aside from modification, what bike would you recommend for someone coming off such a bike and wants something comfortable?

    I appreciate the answers.
     
  5. AyeYo

    AyeYo Member

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    It's the frame geometry. What you're looking for is a cruiser or city bike with a very high headtube that puts the bars far above the seat, for a nearly upright seating position. You're going to be hard pressed to find a frame with that geometry plus all the other items you want, because those things typically do not go hand-in-hand. That riding position does not lend itself to much other than slowly crusing around town or down the boardwalk, and will actually become quickly uncomfortable on long rides because nearly 100% of your weigh is distributed on your arse. The closest thing you'll find is probably the Trek Shift I posted the link to.
     
  6. Xa3phod

    Xa3phod New Member

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    I am going to look at the Shift. Thanks for that info.
     
  7. Nukuhiva

    Nukuhiva Member

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    Long rides on pavement means road bike. MTBs and 'Cruiser' types put you into that more upright position, which gets old after 10 miles or so. Their wider tires and (usually) more aggressive tread also create more rolling resistance, which is great if you want the extra workout, not so great if you're doing distance. I ride in a city whose eastern edge crawls up a mountainside, so there are some fairly steep grades here, but I get around just fine on a plain ole 10-speed, rarely needing more than 3 gears or so.
     
  8. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    MY BAD!?! For me, even at my advanced age, Drop bars are still more comfortable (next year, I may think otherwise!) ... YOU may want to consider BMX-or-"Stingray" handlebars with the caveat mentioned by AyeYo ... BTW. If you want a "comfy" saddle, then consider a BROOKS 67 or some other equally WIDE leather saddle ... the firmer platform will be more comfortable on longer rides ... There are replica "Hairpin" saddles (I think that they weigh between 3-to-4 lbs!!!) which are sprung which you may want to investigate ...
    • your saddle's current height may simply need to be adjusted
    • if you decide to install a Brooks-or-equivalent saddle then you will definitely need to adjust the saddle height due to the greater rails-to-top measurement will preclude the direct swap which can typically be made when changing saddles

    While I am still suspect of recumbents, YOU may want to look into one as a possibility ...

    • there are MANY different recumbent configurations
    • I don't know if there are any inexpensive recumbents, per se, unless you find a used one that is being sold somewhere close to where you live ... recumbents, like tandems, are expensive to ship due to generally being "over-sized"
     
  9. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Performance hybrid or "fitness" bike, such as this:
    [​IMG]
    I posted this one, the Trek 7.3 FX, because I think it hits the sweet spot for ruggedness, performance, and price. But every major brand has a bike like this in its product line.

    A shock fork for road riding is dead weight. In the city or on dirt roads, fatter tires is all the suspension you should need.
     
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