MtB Multitool and stuff

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by ~MoDCoN~, May 4, 2003.

  1. ~MoDCoN~

    ~MoDCoN~ New Member

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    heya all.
    im gettin a new bike soon, and want to equip it well so that it lasts. does anyone have a particualr multitool they recommend? and a cycling comp??? and, lights?

    thanx
    MoD
     
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  2. rek

    rek New Member

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    Multitool -- no idea, I really should buy one before my luck runs out :p I've been caught with a loose cleat once, not fun, you'd think after that I'd have learnt by now ;)

    Cycle computer -- Cateye has recently brought out new versions of their whole product line, so you should be able to get their older versions on the cheap. Before I got a Polar S710 I had a Cateye Velo 2, which was simple, reliable, and did a great job. The Cateye Astrale includes a cadence sensor, which you might like to have.

    Lights -- on my old MTB I had a set of Cateye Daylite Twin lights (2 x 10W globes, lead acid rechargable) They were great, even for night MTBing; although on the heavy side, they were cheap (for high power rechargables), and when the battery inevitably starts to lose its ability to charge, you can simply replace the guts of the battery unit with a standard 6v lead acid pack you can pick up from Jaycar/Dick Smiths for $20.
     
  3. J-MAT

    J-MAT New Member

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    Don't use a "multitool," because they take up way too much room and are heavy. Whether riding on the road or off, you should have the following items with you on EVERY ride. You can omit items if you like to push your bike!!!

    1) One, preferrably two new tubes. Before putting them in your kit, lightly inflate the tubes and liberally coat the entire tube with cornstarch. They will slide in much easier when changing a flat. Get rid of the excess cornstarch. A light coating will do. Also, put the tubes in plastic sandwich bags. Ozone and other pollution will degrade the rubber over time and give you an unpleasant surprise when you least expect it. Also, rotate new tubes in every 6-12 months to be safe.

    2) A patchkit. Be sure it has several patches, and the glue tube has not been punctured. You need a piece of sandpaper as well to prepare the surface to be glued. A very small nail/brad will help to mark your puncture when on the roadside if you have to put the tube down and do something else. Finding a puncture can be difficult sometimes, especially in the dark. Stick the nail in the puncture hole to mark.

    3) Tire levers or tire "irons." Good luck removing a tire without them. They are so light and cheap, you should carry about 3 with you in case one breaks.

    4) Allen wrenches. 4mm, 5mm,& 6mm cover about 90% of your bike. Add an 8mm for crankbolts if you feel like it (use Loctite instead) or whatever else doesn't fall into the 4-5-6 range. Use a grinder to make a slot/flat tip screwdriver on the handle end of one of your allen wrenches (great for derailleur adjustments).

    5) Inflation devices. A Good frame pump is the best. For the road this means a Zefal HPX. MTB bikes have radically different frames so mini pumps are the best bet probably. CO2 is good, but you should always have a mini pump for backup if something fails on the CO2.

    6) A spoke wrench, correctly sized for your wheels nipples based on wrench color. DT and Wheelsmith spoke nipples use a black wrench.

    7) A chainbreaker. I've broken chains on and off road. If I didn't have a chainbreaker with me, I would have been screwed!!! The Park CT-5 chainbreaker is the finest on-the-bike breaker you can get. There are no substitutes for this one!!!

    These are the basics and should be with you on every ride. You can add other stuff like plastic ties, electical tape (wrap it around your pump tube), spokes, small flashlights, etc.

    Whatever you do, you must know how to use these tools and make repairs BEFORE you have problems. If you don't, you will usually find that problems occur when the sun is setting, the temperature is dropping, and you are tired and hungry. This is not the time to learn!!!

    Good luck!!!
     
  4. MGSuarez

    MGSuarez New Member

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    Multi tool- Topeak hummer, crank bros multi 17
    Computer- ???
    Light- Lights & Motion Arc Cabeza HID (AWESOME)
     
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