MTB pedals on a road bike?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Rickn, Apr 11, 2004.

  1. Rickn

    Rickn Guest

    Gents: I just purchased a "like-New-1997-Bianchi-Veloce"
    on ebay for $380.00. Italian made, steel frame, Campy
    equiped. To me, this sounded like a good deal. Please tell
    me you agree.

    On to my silly-question-of-the-day: I will need to buy
    pedals for the bike. I already own a pair of SPD-mountain
    bike shoes and I am cheap. Will I be able to mount mountain
    bike pedals on this bike? Is there any reason not to? I
    would like to be able to swap the pedals from my road bike
    to mountain bike as necessary. (However, I am not yet sure
    if the crank-threads are the same from bike-to-bike.)

    Thanks, Rick
     
    Tags:


  2. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    rickn wrote:

    > Gents: I just purchased a "like-New-1997-Bianchi-Veloce"
    > on ebay for $380.00. Italian made, steel frame, Campy
    > equiped. To me, this sounded like a good deal. Please tell
    > me you agree.
    >
    > On to my silly-question-of-the-day: I will need to buy
    > pedals for the bike. I already own a pair of SPD-mountain
    > bike shoes and I am cheap. Will I be able to mount
    > mountain bike pedals on this bike? Is there any reason
    > not to? I would like to be able to swap the pedals from
    > my road bike to mountain bike as necessary. (However, I
    > am not yet sure if the crank-threads are the same from
    > bike-to-bike.)

    Yes, they are. Remember the left pedal is reverse-threaded,
    though. Make sure you put the right pedal on the right side,
    so you don't strip the threads.

    MTB pedals are fine. IMO they're better because they have
    clips on both sides. Single sided road pedals are
    inconvenient, and usually more expensive. There's no reason
    to bother with them unless you need one of the larger
    platform designs. Most people don't.

    I use the same MTB pedal on both my road and mountain bikes.
    When I bought my road bike, I looked for another pair of my
    old Shimano SPDs on eBay. I paid $20 for some NOS, in a
    factory box w/ new cleats, and I couldn't be happier.

    Matt O.
     
  3. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    rickn wrote:

    > Gents: I just purchased a "like-New-1997-Bianchi-Veloce"
    > on ebay for $380.00. Italian made, steel frame, Campy
    > equiped. To me, this sounded like a good deal. Please tell
    > me you agree.
    >
    > On to my silly-question-of-the-day: I will need to buy
    > pedals for the bike. I already own a pair of SPD-mountain
    > bike shoes and I am cheap. Will I be able to mount
    > mountain bike pedals on this bike? Is there any reason
    > not to? I would like to be able to swap the pedals from
    > my road bike to mountain bike as necessary. (However, I
    > am not yet sure if the crank-threads are the same from
    > bike-to-bike.)

    Yes you can use the same type of pedal and Yes the threads
    are the same (so you'd need only one pair of shoes for
    both bikes.)

    --
    Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1
    April, 1971
     
  4. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On Mon, 12 Apr 2004 00:49:16 -0400, rickn <rickn> wrote:

    >Gents: I just purchased a "like-New-1997-Bianchi-Veloce"
    >on ebay for $380.00. Italian made, steel frame, Campy
    >equiped. To me, this sounded like a good deal. Please tell
    >me you agree.
    >

    Without seeing the bike, hard to say for certain. But every
    Veloce owner I have known has been happy with their bike.

    >On to my silly-question-of-the-day: I will need to buy
    >pedals for the bike. I already own a pair of SPD-mountain
    >bike shoes and I am cheap. Will I be able to mount mountain
    >bike pedals on this bike?

    Yes.

    >Is there any reason not to?

    You will have some bicyclist look at you with derision.
    Hopefully you can find better things to do with your time
    than take these people seriously. Beyond that, no
    significant reason not to do this.

    >I would like to be able to swap the pedals from my road
    >bike to mountain bike as necessary. (However, I am not yet
    >sure if the crank-threads are the same from bike-to-bike.)
    >

    The threads will be the same. You will probably get tired of
    swapping, though, so plan on another set of pedals in the
    near future :)
     
  5. Ken

    Ken Guest

    Dan Daniel <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:
    > You will have some bicyclist look at you with derision.
    > Hopefully you can find better things to do with your time
    > than take these people seriously. Beyond that, no
    > significant reason not to do this.

    Challenge them to race up the longest, steepest hill in your
    area. If you win, they won't sneer at you any more. If you
    lose, well ...
     
  6. > >On to my silly-question-of-the-day: I will need to buy
    > >pedals for the bike. I already own a pair of SPD-mountain
    > >bike shoes and I am cheap. Will I be able to mount
    > >mountain bike pedals on this bike?
    >
    > Yes.
    >
    > >Is there any reason not to?
    >
    > You will have some bicyclist look at you with derision.
    > Hopefully you can find better things to do with your time
    > than take these people seriously. Beyond that, no
    > significant reason not to do this.

    Oh gosh, hopefully not! It would be at least partly my
    fault, as I've been part of various bicycle product meetings
    at TREK where I've pushed strongly for double-sided SPD
    pedals on all road bikes up to $1700 (which means all road
    bikes that come with pedals, since the more-expensive models
    come without any). I've noted no "derisive" resistance to
    them whatsoever. People often change to a lighter-weight
    "road" pedal (most often Speedplays, sometimes Looks), but
    rarely is this accompanied with remarks regarding the
    suitability of "mountain bike" pedals on a road bike.

    A lot of very serious riders use double-sides SPDs on their
    road bikes. Many simply find them more practical; if
    they're doing a long ride or tour, they have an easier time
    getting around when off the bike. I definitely could have
    used something more practical than my lightweight Speedplay
    X2 setup when I was up on the Tourmalet last July, waiting
    & walking around for four hours before the Tour de France
    came through. Pretty much ruined a pair of shoes in that
    one outing!

    (But it was worth it- check out
    www.ChainReaction.com/france03racephotos.htm#tourmalet)

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    "Dan Daniel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Mon, 12 Apr 2004 00:49:16 -0400, rickn <rickn> wrote:
    >
    > >Gents: I just purchased a "like-New-1997-Bianchi-Veloce"
    > >on ebay for $380.00. Italian made, steel frame, Campy
    > >equiped. To me, this sounded like a good deal. Please
    > >tell me you agree.
    > >
    >
    > Without seeing the bike, hard to say for certain. But
    > every Veloce owner I have known has been happy with
    > their bike.
    >
    > >On to my silly-question-of-the-day: I will need to buy
    > >pedals for the bike. I already own a pair of SPD-mountain
    > >bike shoes and I am cheap. Will I be able to mount
    > >mountain bike pedals on this bike?
    >
    > Yes.
    >
    > >Is there any reason not to?
    >
    > You will have some bicyclist look at you with derision.
    > Hopefully you can find better things to do with your time
    > than take these people seriously. Beyond that, no
    > significant reason not to do this.
    >
    > >I would like to be able to swap the pedals from my
    > >road bike to mountain bike as necessary. (However, I
    > >am not yet sure if the crank-threads are the same from
    > >bike-to-bike.)
    > >
    >
    > The threads will be the same. You will probably get tired
    > of swapping, though, so plan on another set of pedals in
    > the near future :)
     
  7. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >A lot of very serious riders use double-sides SPDs on their
    >road bikes.

    The vast majority of miles I put on my road bike are with
    double-sided SPDs (Ritchey, actually), for all the reasons
    Mike mentioned.

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of
    the $695 ti frame
     
  8. Others have already answered yes and several have offered up
    lightness and speedplay (presumeably because of float) as
    road options. I also use SPD pedals- WTB 250 "Stealth" in my
    case. They are quite cheap (I haven't paid more than $50 off
    ebay or on-line), light and offer adjustable float. Bebop
    are another option but they are more expensive.

    > I will need to buy pedals for the bike. I already own a
    > pair of SPD-mountain bike shoes and I am cheap. Will I be
    > able to mount mountain bike pedals on this bike? Is there
    > any reason not to?
     
  9. I use mtb pedals -- Speedplay Frogs -- on all my bikes:
    road, mtb, touring.

    With stiff soled shoes, like Sidi Dominator 4's, I don't see
    any disadvantages on the road and plenty of advantages (eg
    ease of walking; also I like the float of the Frogs better
    than the Speedplay
    X/2's, which I used previously).
     
  10. Jeff Wills

    Jeff Wills Guest

    Mark Hickey <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >A lot of very serious riders use double-sides SPDs on
    > >their road bikes.
    >
    > The vast majority of miles I put on my road bike are with
    > double-sided SPDs (Ritchey, actually), for all the reasons
    > Mike mentioned.
    >

    Ditto here. I use double-sided SPD pedals (elderly
    Shimano PD-M737's
    for the most part) even though most of the riding I do
    is on the road.
    Far more convenient than even the single-sided SPD's
    I've tried.

    Jeff
     
  11. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

    Joined:
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    Yes, but buy another pair of SPD pedals for your road bicycle.
    Convenience is important, but I think that you will also find that the steel pedal threads will wear the aluminum ones on your cranks if you are busy swapping them back and forth.
    If the "new" bicycle fits you and has no major flaws, it's a good deal.
     
  12. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Hi Rick, Congrats on the new purchase of the Bianchi. $380
    Sounds great to me for a like new Bianchi Veloce. Crank
    Pedal threads on the Bianchi should be 9/16"x20. I guess the
    bottom line is, is to use what you like the best. I
    recommend just buying another set of Pedals, and leave them
    on the Bianchi. Not really a good idea to be constantly
    taking them on, and off. These newer MTB Pedals are not all
    that expensive.

    Don't forget to coat the pedal threads with some Anti-Seize
    before installing them. Any Auto Parts store, and Wally
    World will carry small tubes of this stuff. Enjoy the "new"
    bike, Mark

    Mountain Bike Pedalrickn <rickn> wrote in message news:<[email protected]
    60.giganews.com>...
    > Gents: I just purchased a "like-New-1997-Bianchi-Veloce"
    > on ebay for $380.00. Italian made, steel frame, Campy
    > equiped. To me, this sounded like a good deal. Please tell
    > me you agree.
    >
    > On to my silly-question-of-the-day: I will need to buy
    > pedals for the bike. I already own a pair of SPD-mountain
    > bike shoes and I am cheap. Will I be able to mount
    > mountain bike pedals on this bike? Is there any reason
    > not to? I would like to be able to swap the pedals from
    > my road bike to mountain bike as necessary. (However, I
    > am not yet sure if the crank-threads are the same from
    > bike-to-bike.)
    >
    > Thanks, Rick
     
  13. My answer is pretty much the same as everyone else's. For
    week long tours such as RAGBRAI, BAK, CNC, CANDISC, Pedal
    the Peaks, I put my double sided SPD747 pedals on my
    beautiful Waterford 1200 with wonderful Campagnolo Chorus.
    And use my mountain bike shoes. These are all week long 500
    mile rides. On loaded tours I also use the SPD747 pedals on
    my touring bike. Walking around lunch stops, sag stops,
    campgrounds, scenic overlooks, etc., its easiest to use SPD
    style pedals and shoes.

    For dedicated road rides such as brevets, one day road
    rides, I put on the Time Equipe road pedals. On these rides
    I am covering miles and not spending much time walking
    around off the bike. Road pedals are superior for actually
    pedaling. But on many rides the ease of off bike wwlking is
    better to have.

    rickn <rickn> wrote in message news:<[email protected]
    60.giganews.com>...
    > Gents: I just purchased a "like-New-1997-Bianchi-Veloce"
    > on ebay for $380.00. Italian made, steel frame, Campy
    > equiped. To me, this sounded like a good deal. Please tell
    > me you agree.
    >
    > On to my silly-question-of-the-day: I will need to buy
    > pedals for the bike. I already own a pair of SPD-mountain
    > bike shoes and I am cheap. Will I be able to mount
    > mountain bike pedals on this bike? Is there any reason
    > not to? I would like to be able to swap the pedals from
    > my road bike to mountain bike as necessary. (However, I
    > am not yet sure if the crank-threads are the same from
    > bike-to-bike.)
    >
    > Thanks, Rick
     
  14. Ted Bennett

    Ted Bennett Guest

    [email protected] (Mark) wrote:

    > Don't forget to coat the pedal threads with some Anti-
    > Seize before installing them. Any Auto Parts store, and
    > Wally World will carry small tubes of this stuff. Enjoy
    > the "new" bike, Mark

    There's no need for anti-seize here, as ordinary grease will
    do the job just as well, is cheaper and is already wherever
    bikes are worked on.

    --
    Ted Bennett Portland OR
     
  15. Dan R H

    Dan R H Guest

    Frogs here also on all my three road bikes and MTB. Fours
    sets of pedals, one pair of shoes!

    Dan Hertlein

    "Eagle Jackson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I use mtb pedals -- Speedplay Frogs -- on all my bikes:
    > road, mtb, touring.
    >
    > With stiff soled shoes, like Sidi Dominator 4's, I don't
    > see any disadvantages on the road and plenty of advantages
    > (eg ease of walking; also I like the float of the Frogs
    > better than the Speedplay
    > X/2's, which I used previously).
     
  16. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Russell Seaton" <[email protected]> wrote

    > Road pedals are superior for actually pedaling.

    How so?
     
  17. [email protected] (Russell Seaton) wrote in message
    > Road pedals are superior for actually pedaling.

    Or do you mean, people who use road pedals feel superior?

    The issue may be shoe stiffness not pedals. FWIW, Frog II
    cleats can be used on road shoes.
     
  18. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Ted, Grease is certainly NOT a satisfactory substitue for an
    anti-seize compound. Being a mechanic by trade for 30+
    years, I've seen other guys use regular grease to coat
    threads on bolts, etc., and seen these same bolts snap, or
    strip whatever they were threaded into further on down the
    road. (Especially with dissimilar metals)

    You might think grease is better than nothing, but in most
    case gives absolutely no improvement vs nothing at all. Read
    up on this.

    Really, does it pay to cheap out for a $3 tube of Anti-
    seize? As mentioned before too, constantly changing out
    Pedals over, and over isn't a good idea either. Mark

    Ted Bennett <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<tedbennett-
    [email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (Mark) wrote:
    >
    > > Don't forget to coat the pedal threads with some Anti-
    > > Seize before installing them. Any Auto Parts store, and
    > > Wally World will carry small tubes of this stuff. Enjoy
    > > the "new" bike, Mark
    >
    > There's no need for anti-seize here, as ordinary grease
    > will do the job just as well, is cheaper and is already
    > wherever bikes are worked on.
     
  19. Jim Edgar

    Jim Edgar Guest

    [email protected] (NeauDL) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I use single-sided SPD pedals because I use the SH-71 SPD
    > road cleat (with "pontoons") on road shoes, and the double-
    > sided pedals (Icon brand) which I had didn't work very
    > well with the road cleat. It was hard to clip in. Has
    > anyone any experience using the SH-71 cleats with the new
    > Shimano double-sided pedals (959, 540 or 520)?

    I've used SH71's in double sided 525's and similar pedals.
    Also have used the double sided cleats (the name of which
    escapes me right now) in the single sided SPD road pedals.
    There was no perceptible difference.

    The ICON pedals probably didn't use the actual SPD cleat.

    Pontoons were mostly to keep you from grinding down the
    cleat edge whle walking.

    -- Jim

    (now happily using ATAC's for double-side pedals)
     
  20. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    [email protected] (Mark) wrote:

    >Ted, Grease is certainly NOT a satisfactory substitue for
    >an anti-seize compound. Being a mechanic by trade for 30+
    >years, I've seen other guys use regular grease to coat
    >threads on bolts, etc., and seen these same bolts snap, or
    >strip whatever they were threaded into further on down the
    >road. (Especially with dissimilar metals)
    >
    >You might think grease is better than nothing, but in most
    >case gives absolutely no improvement vs nothing at all.
    >Read up on this.

    Are you talking about bicycle applications, or "mechanical"?
    It's been my VERY different experience that grease will be
    adequate for just about anything on a bicycle (and will
    certainly be better than "nothing" if only in preventing
    creaking noises). I do recommend AS when installing ti or
    aluminum bolts (hate to hear that *pop* and see the puff of
    smoke from the galling otherwise).

    >Really, does it pay to cheap out for a $3 tube of Anti-
    >seize? As mentioned before too, constantly changing out
    >Pedals over, and over isn't a good idea either. Mark

    I make it a point to take my pedals off once every couple
    years. ;-)

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of
    the $695 ti frame
     
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