mtb speed problems

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Lee Tharps, Jun 23, 2003.

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  1. Lee Tharps

    Lee Tharps Guest

    I got a 5 year old mongoose mountain bike that I bought used from someone. I live in the city and
    primarily ride on pavement. I just switched out my knobby tires for a pair of nice smooth roadie
    type tires. It has made a noticeable change in the speed I can ride, which is good cuz I need to
    keep up with the pace of traffic.

    I find myself out pedalling my bike quite a bit now. In the highest gear on fairly flat
    ground, I pedal faster than the bike can handle. It's an odd feeling, and it also seems to be
    limiting my speed.

    can anyone suggest a course of action to help solve this and/or make me go faster?

    I do not want to buy another bike.

    -lee

    _______________________________
    M Lee Tharps Dept of Chemical Engineering Carnegie Mellon University [email protected]
    www.espasticity.net

    319 Morewood Ave Apt 18 Pittsburgh, PA 15213 ,-._,-. \/)"(\/ (_o_)
    (412) 687-2521 / \/)
    (413) 901-4785(mobile) (|| ||) oo-oo
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  2. Example.Com

    Example.Com Guest

    Obvious, change gearing. How to do this - LBS, they can help, big time.

    "Lee Tharps" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > I got a 5 year old mongoose mountain bike that I bought used from someone. I live in the city and
    > primarily ride on pavement. I just switched out my knobby tires for a pair of nice smooth roadie
    > type tires. It has made a noticeable change in the speed I can ride, which is good cuz I need to
    > keep up with the pace of traffic.
    >
    > I find myself out pedalling my bike quite a bit now. In the highest gear on fairly flat ground,
    > I pedal faster than the bike can handle. It's an odd feeling, and it also seems to be limiting
    > my speed.
    >
    > can anyone suggest a course of action to help solve this and/or make me go faster?
    >
    > I do not want to buy another bike.
    >
    > -lee
    >
    > _______________________________
    > M Lee Tharps Dept of Chemical Engineering Carnegie Mellon University [email protected]
    > www.espasticity.net
    >
    > 319 Morewood Ave Apt 18 Pittsburgh, PA 15213 ,-._,-. \/)"(\/ (_o_)
    > (412) 687-2521 / \/)
    > (412) 901-4785(mobile) (|| ||) oo-oo
    > ______________________________
     
  3. Brian Hughes

    Brian Hughes Guest

    Changing the cassette or freewheel is fairly simple if you have the tools. I changed the freewheel
    on my Raleigh MTB from a 13-34 to a 11-34 at a total cost of $24. This increased the gear ratio of
    my highest gear (from about 82 to 98 gear inches) and I can go quite a bit faster before I spin out
    on a downhill.

    Brian
     
  4. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <Pine.LNX.4.55L-
    [email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I got a 5 year old mongoose mountain bike that I bought used from someone. I live in the city and
    > primarily ride on pavement. I just switched out my knobby tires for a pair of nice smooth roadie
    > type tires. It has made a noticeable change in the speed I can ride, which is good cuz I need to
    > keep up with the pace of traffic.
    >
    > I find myself out pedalling my bike quite a bit now. In the highest gear on fairly flat ground,
    > I pedal faster than the bike can handle. It's an odd feeling, and it also seems to be limiting
    > my speed.
    >
    > can anyone suggest a course of action to help solve this and/or make me go faster?
    >
    > I do not want to buy another bike.

    If you mean that you are pedaling as fast as your legs can go, and still feel like you could go
    faster if your legs could, then you probably need higher gears. In that case, just get a replacement
    cluster for the rear with a higher range (smaller cogs). $30 should do it.

    ....

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  5. Smaller cogs in back, and/or a larger chainring in front. Let the bike shop do this, as there may be
    chain/derailler changes too.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
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