Mtb'er descending stairs :)

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by gescom, Jan 10, 2004.

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  1. gescom

    gescom New Member

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  2. Arpit

    Arpit Guest

  3. Andrew Swan

    Andrew Swan Guest

  4. Arpit

    Arpit Guest

    hahah, yeah i was wondering that myself

    On Sun, 11 Jan 2004 18:16:22 +1100, Andrew Swan <[email protected]> wrote:

    >gescom wrote:
    >> Check this guy out: http://www.bikeforums.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=8389&stc=1
    >>
    >> It was posted by 'w417h3r' in this thread
    >> http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=26701&page=19&pp=15
    >>
    >>
    >> Crazy! Don't have a mtb atm but when I do I'll make sure its a hardtail with a rack. ;)
    >
    >Why doesn't he ride down the smooth bit? Or is that just a roadie thing to ask?
    >
    >&roo
     
  5. Andrew Swan wrote:

    > Why doesn't he ride down the smooth bit? Or is that just a roadie thing to ask?

    Skill? Confidence?

    The same reason people tend to walk rather than ride longitudinally planked bridges.

    A practical consideration is if he drops off it, his front wheel can drop 6", which might be a bit
    of a disaster?
     
  6. Andrew Swan

    Andrew Swan Guest

    Terry Collins wrote:
    > Andrew Swan wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Why doesn't he ride down the smooth bit? Or is that just a roadie thing to ask?
    >
    >
    > Skill? Confidence?
    >
    > The same reason people tend to walk rather than ride longitudinally planked bridges.
    >
    > A practical consideration is if he drops off it, his front wheel can drop 6", which might be a bit
    > of a disaster?

    It never occurred to me that it might be easier to ride the steps than the smooth bit. So why did
    the ancient Mayans/Incas/Aztecs or whoever built the damn thing bother putting the smooth bit in?

    Plank bridges are an unavoidable obstacle on which one might not feel confident, but nobody rides
    down a pyramid/mountain thing (esp. on their rack) unless they are seriously confident - I reckon
    he's doing the steps for fun (not my idea of it, though) or extra difficulty. He could ride the
    smooth bit if he chose.

    &roo
     
  7. Jorgen

    Jorgen Guest

    1"Andrew Swan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%[email protected]... [...]
    >
    > It never occurred to me that it might be easier to ride the steps than the smooth bit. So why did
    > the ancient Mayans/Incas/Aztecs or whoever built the damn thing bother putting the smooth bit in?

    [Image of two azteks/whatever pushing a wheelbarrow up the stairs, one on each side]

    > Plank bridges are an unavoidable obstacle on which one might not feel confident, but nobody rides
    > down a pyramid/mountain thing (esp. on their rack) unless they are seriously confident - I reckon
    > he's doing the steps for fun (not my idea of it, though) or extra difficulty. He could ride the
    > smooth bit if he chose.

    Steps are fun, I used to do them a few times in Oslo - never had a puncture from them either.
    However they'd be _nowhere_ as long as pictured.

    j
     
  8. amirm

    amirm New Member

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    Whoa, Whoa!

    Not to offend anyone here in anyway, but hey people! Aren't we entitled to get our kick in any way we please (well, as long as it doesn't hurt anyone else)? If someone gets the kick out of climbing down all those steps, and if he can do it correctly, what's wrong with that? Pretty sure these steps are not the only way to get off that hill, so why he does not use the smooth bit is, ehem..., irrelevant. And so is whether or not it's right to use a hardtail with a rack.

    In my humble view, bike riders are the most accommodating and supportive bunch of people, so I'm gonna take it easy on him.



     
  9. its_stuart

    its_stuart New Member

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    'It never occurred to me that it might be easier to ride the steps than the smooth bit. So why did
    the ancient Mayans/Incas/Aztecs or whoever built the damn thing bother putting the smooth bit in?'

    Frightening thought but perhaps it was for a wheelbarrow?

    :eek:
     
  10. its_stuart wrote:

    > 'It never occurred to me that it might be easier to ride the steps than the smooth bit. So why did
    > the ancient Mayans/Incas/Aztecs or whoever built the damn thing bother putting the smooth bit in?'
    >
    > Frightening thought but perhaps it was for a wheelbarrow?

    I had the same thought, till I had seen a road bike go down. I don't even want to think about what
    your $400+ road rims would look like by the time you get to the bottom of the stairs if there
    wasn't a flat bit.

    Certainly is more fun to do it on an mtb though. :)

    --
    Linux Registered User # 302622 <http://counter.li.org
     
  11. On Tue, 03 Feb 2004 03:50:35 GMT, its_stuart
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >'It never occurred to me that it might be easier to ride the steps than the smooth bit. So why did
    >the ancient Mayans/Incas/Aztecs or whoever built the damn thing bother putting the smooth bit in?'
    >
    >Frightening thought but perhaps it was for a wheelbarrow?
    >
    >:eek:

    I didn't think they invested the wheel. Perhaps it was for a sledbarrow?
     
  12. On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 11:43:08 +1100, Big Bill Cody
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Tue, 03 Feb 2004 03:50:35 GMT, its_stuart <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>'It never occurred to me that it might be easier to ride the steps than the smooth bit. So why did
    >>the ancient Mayans/Incas/Aztecs or whoever built the damn thing bother putting the smooth bit in?'
    >>
    >>Frightening thought but perhaps it was for a wheelbarrow?
    >>
    >>:eek:
    >
    >I didn't think they invested the wheel. Perhaps it was for a sledbarrow?
    >

    Um... I meant invented
     
  13. ...snip.....
    >
    > It never occurred to me that it might be easier to ride the steps than the smooth bit. So why did
    > the ancient Mayans/Incas/Aztecs or whoever built the damn thing bother putting the smooth bit in?

    Umm, isn't it built from concrete? I don't ever remember seeing mayan/inca/aztec handrails.
     
  14. On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 11:43:08 +1100, Big Bill Cody <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Tue, 03 Feb 2004 03:50:35 GMT, its_stuart <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>'It never occurred to me that it might be easier to ride the steps than the smooth bit. So why did
    >>the ancient Mayans/Incas/Aztecs or whoever built the damn thing bother putting the smooth bit in?'
    >>
    >>Frightening thought but perhaps it was for a wheelbarrow?
    >>
    >>:eek:
    >
    >I didn't think they invested the wheel. Perhaps it was for a sledbarrow?

    It would've been easier to pull sliding loads up a smooth incline, rather than up a series of steps.

    ---
    Cheers

    PeterC

    [Rushing headlong: out of control - and there ain't no stopping]
    [and there's nothing you can do about it at all]
     
  15. its_stuart

    its_stuart New Member

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    I think he should have got a good run up at it and hit it as hard as he could jackass style. Producing at least a 100 mtr flailing freefall followed by some very busy landing action. Now that would have impressed me :D
     
  16. flyingdutch

    flyingdutch New Member

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    tracking a 6inch wide smooth bit would be even harder and just another thing to concentrate on.

    The smooth bit was probably built into the steps to drag the stones/parts up during construction

    There is a movement (albeit small) in the US (Gary Fisher, et al. but what would he know...) to 29" mtbs for smoothness an other issues. some framemeakers are building them now. Salsa and others...
     
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