MTB'ing growing in popularity



K

Ken Marcet

Guest
Now I am not a great fan on mtb's, but it is good to see that at least on
type of cycling is growing in pupularity.
http://www.baxterbulletin.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050307/NEWS01/503070313/1002

Now maybe some of these people are converts from the road cycle world, maybe
some are new to cycling.
But perhaps some of these people will ride on the roads as well and aid in
making drivers more aware of bikers.
But I doubt it.

Ken

--
More of my mind dribblings: http://mind-dribble.blogspot.com/
And my homepage: http://kcm-home.tripod.com/
 
Ken Marcet wrote:
> Now I am not a great fan on mtb's, but it is good to see that at

least on
> type of cycling is growing in pupularity.
>

http://www.baxterbulletin.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050307/NEWS01/503070313/1002
>
> Now maybe some of these people are converts from the road cycle

world, maybe
> some are new to cycling.
> But perhaps some of these people will ride on the roads as well and

aid in
> making drivers more aware of bikers.
> But I doubt it.


Not a very impressive article, not a single statistic to back up the
headline claim. Perhaps, being that it's Arkansas, they've just
discovered mountain biking.

My impression is that mountain biking is not gaining in popularity, at
least not here in the NE US. The numbers seem pretty constant. I have
seen many cases in the last few years of mountain bikers getting into
road biking. I think that the fitness-driven types realize that they
can get more consistent workouts on the road.
 
"Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> Ken Marcet wrote:
> > Now I am not a great fan on mtb's, but it is good to see that at

> least on
> > type of cycling is growing in pupularity.
> >

>

http://www.baxterbulletin.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050307/NEWS01/503070313/1002
> >
> > Now maybe some of these people are converts from the road cycle

> world, maybe
> > some are new to cycling.
> > But perhaps some of these people will ride on the roads as well and

> aid in
> > making drivers more aware of bikers.
> > But I doubt it.

>
> Not a very impressive article, not a single statistic to back up the
> headline claim. Perhaps, being that it's Arkansas, they've just
> discovered mountain biking.
>
> My impression is that mountain biking is not gaining in popularity, at
> least not here in the NE US. The numbers seem pretty constant. I have
> seen many cases in the last few years of mountain bikers getting into
> road biking. I think that the fitness-driven types realize that they
> can get more consistent workouts on the road.
>

Well here in Florida, I notice more people riding "comfort" bikes, these
riders tend to be older.
While younger riders tend to like the MTB's, I notice very few road cycles
out there.

Ken
 

> >


> >

> Well here in Florida, I notice more people riding "comfort" bikes,

these
> riders tend to be older.
> While younger riders tend to like the MTB's, I notice very few road

cycles
> out there.
>
> Ken


Huh? Where in Florida are you, Ken? You need to move to Orlando or
Gainesville. Although rednecks and old people try to exterminate us...
there are still lots of road cyclists and some great big groups thereof
in both towns.
 
Peter Cole wrote:

> Not a very impressive article, not a single statistic to back up the
> headline claim.


Yeah, that's true. The headline is not particularly accurate. I still
enjoyed the article, though.

> Perhaps, being that it's Arkansas, they've just discovered mountain

biking.

Why the dig on Arkansas? I'm sure there are plenty of people who ride
there and have been doing so for years. Or is this a red state/blue
state kind of thing?

> I have seen many cases in the last few years of mountain bikers

getting into
> road biking. I think that the fitness-driven types realize that they
> can get more consistent workouts on the road.


I suppose if you only ride for fitness, road biking would be the way to
go since it's, as you say, a more consistent workout. I'm a big fan of
mountain biking, mainly because I enjoy the outdoors and sightseeing.
Improved fitness is a benefit, I suppose, but if fitness is all you're
after you can spend $80 on a pair of running shoes and get as good of a
workout, if not better, than you'll get on a bike.

-Bill H.
 
Peter Cole wrote:

> Ken Marcet wrote:


>> Now I am not a great fan on mtb's, but it is good to see that at
>> least on type of cycling is growing in pupularity.
>>

>

http://www.baxterbulletin.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050307/NEWS01/503070313/1002
>>
>> Now maybe some of these people are converts from the road cycle
>> world, maybe some are new to cycling.
>> But perhaps some of these people will ride on the roads as well and
>> aid in making drivers more aware of bikers.
>> But I doubt it.

>
> Not a very impressive article, not a single statistic to back up the
> headline claim. Perhaps, being that it's Arkansas, they've just
> discovered mountain biking.
>
> My impression is that mountain biking is not gaining in popularity, at
> least not here in the NE US. The numbers seem pretty constant.


I don't know if it's growing, but it's changing. The tradional cross country
riders seem to be dwindling, but being replaced by downhillers, jumpers,
huckers, or whatever you want to call them. My friends back in CA report these
hucker folks being all over the place, in huge numbers. But when you go high
into the mountains where only the fit XC riders go, the numbers are the same or
fewer. In Orange County the total number increase could be attributed to
growing population, especially with new housing tracts near the trailheads. So
it's hard to say if the sport itself is growing.

> I have
> seen many cases in the last few years of mountain bikers getting into
> road biking. I think that the fitness-driven types realize that they
> can get more consistent workouts on the road.


I think most people recognize this. During the mountain bike boom of the 90s,
many shops had not a single road bike in stock. Now they have as many as
mountain bikes. Mountain biking brought a lot of people into the sport, who are
now discovering the pleasures of efficient road bikes that can be ridden from
the front door. I think this is a big issue too. Unless you live within a few
miles of a trailhead, mountain biking is too logistically complicated. One
thing I've really noticed too, is how little a road bike has to be maintained,
compared to one ridden on dirt.

Matt O.
 
MTB'ing is pretty hot here in the SE, too. Many of the parks and forests
are starting to make accomodaions for them/us.

Tsali is a good example.

- -

"May you have the winds at your back,
And a really low gear for the hills!"

Chris Zacho ~ "Your Friendly Neighborhood Wheelman"

Chris'Z Corner
http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
 
In article <[email protected]>,
"Peter Cole" <[email protected]> writes:

> My impression is that mountain biking is not gaining in popularity, at
> least not here in the NE US. The numbers seem pretty constant. I have
> seen many cases in the last few years of mountain bikers getting into
> road biking. I think that the fitness-driven types realize that they
> can get more consistent workouts on the road.


This is just speculation on my part, but I can envision
the popularity of 'mountain biking' declining. I think
originally (back in the '80s), casual enthusiasts were
mostly into not too technical singletrack, and perhaps
some back-country touring, while the more avid riders
would advance into cross country or downhill competition.

Since then the bikes, the trails, and the skills required
to handle each have become increasingly refined, specialized
and technical, to an intimidating (at least to tyros) degree.
In short, I think the 'freeride' style may have pretty well
killed the old concept of mountain biking. And the current
bikes themselves are pretty expensive as well as elaborate,
which is quite a dis-incentive to anyone who just plain wants
to hop on a bike and go. It's a lot simpler in several ways
to just get a bicycle that looks like a bicycle, and ride
on the roads & streets. Maybe 'mountain biking' has refined
itself out of popularity.


cheers,
Tom

--
-- Nothing is safe from me.
Above address is just a spam midden.
I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
 
Ken Marcet wrote:
> "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> >
> > Ken Marcet wrote:
> > > Now I am not a great fan on mtb's, but it is good to see that at

> > least on
> > > type of cycling is growing in pupularity.
> > >

> >

>

http://www.baxterbulletin.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050307/NEWS01/503070313/1002
> > >
> > > Now maybe some of these people are converts from the road cycle

> > world, maybe
> > > some are new to cycling.
> > > But perhaps some of these people will ride on the roads as well

and
> > aid in
> > > making drivers more aware of bikers.
> > > But I doubt it.

> >
> > Not a very impressive article, not a single statistic to back up

the
> > headline claim. Perhaps, being that it's Arkansas, they've just
> > discovered mountain biking.
> >
> > My impression is that mountain biking is not gaining in popularity,

at
> > least not here in the NE US. The numbers seem pretty constant. I

have
> > seen many cases in the last few years of mountain bikers getting

into
> > road biking. I think that the fitness-driven types realize that

they
> > can get more consistent workouts on the road.
> >

> Well here in Florida, I notice more people riding "comfort" bikes,

these
> riders tend to be older.
> While younger riders tend to like the MTB's, I notice very few road

cycles
> out there.
>
> Ken


I think comfort bikes are growing more and more popular as this baby
boom generation gets out there to ride. Just my humble opinion. As a
Boomer looking for a comfortable ride. ;-)
All good things,
Maggie
 
On Mon, 7 Mar 2005 13:52:24 -0500, "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>I think most people recognize this. During the mountain bike boom of the 90s,
>many shops had not a single road bike in stock. Now they have as many as
>mountain bikes. Mountain biking brought a lot of people into the sport, who are
>now discovering the pleasures of efficient road bikes that can be ridden from
>the front door. I think this is a big issue too. Unless you live within a few
>miles of a trailhead, mountain biking is too logistically complicated. One
>thing I've really noticed too, is how little a road bike has to be maintained,
>compared to one ridden on dirt.
>
>Matt O.


Good points. I'd say that about half of the people that go in to buy a
bike, even now, get a mountain bike when what they really need is a
standard road bike with perhaps 26mm tires. They talk about 'riding off
road', but they really mean ride around the neighborhood and cut through a
hard packed section of woods on the way to the park, heh.

I have to admit a MTB looks pretty flashy and seems like it'd be cool to be
able to bounce up on the curbs, but when you get down to it, very few
people are riding those in inch-deep mud and jumping logs, I bet. ;-)

-B
 
Tom Keats wrote:

> This is just speculation on my part, but I can envision
> the popularity of 'mountain biking' declining. I think
> originally (back in the '80s), casual enthusiasts were
> mostly into not too technical singletrack, and perhaps
> some back-country touring, while the more avid riders
> would advance into cross country or downhill competition.


> Since then the bikes, the trails, and the skills required
> to handle each have become increasingly refined, specialized
> and technical, to an intimidating (at least to tyros) degree.
> In short, I think the 'freeride' style may have pretty well
> killed the old concept of mountain biking. And the current
> bikes themselves are pretty expensive as well as elaborate,
> which is quite a dis-incentive to anyone who just plain wants
> to hop on a bike and go.


You can still get a decent, new, mountain bike for way less than a
comparable level of a road bike or even a good comfort/hybrid design.

And used markets can be great for just about anyone.

> It's a lot simpler in several ways
> to just get a bicycle that looks like a bicycle, and ride
> on the roads & streets. Maybe 'mountain biking' has refined
> itself out of popularity.


I certainly think there is more segmentation than there used to be,
which is, in part, why I've stopped really enjoying Bicycling magazine.
They are trying to appeal to too wide of an audience - everything from
the hard-core road racers to the downhill mountain bike riders. I
don't identify with either of those groups so the magazine has little
appeal for me.

-Bill H.
 
Bill H. wrote:
> Peter Cole wrote:
> > Perhaps, being that it's Arkansas, they've just discovered mountain

> biking.
>
> Why the dig on Arkansas? I'm sure there are plenty of people who

ride
> there and have been doing so for years. Or is this a red state/blue
> state kind of thing?


Just a joke, son. Though it's pretty well known that fitness/outdoors
fads start on the left coast years ahead, then travel to the right
coast & hit the heartland last.

> I suppose if you only ride for fitness, road biking would be the way

to
> go since it's, as you say, a more consistent workout. I'm a big fan

of
> mountain biking, mainly because I enjoy the outdoors and sightseeing.
> Improved fitness is a benefit, I suppose, but if fitness is all

you're
> after you can spend $80 on a pair of running shoes and get as good of

a
> workout, if not better, than you'll get on a bike.


While you knees last.
 
Tom Keats wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> writes:
>
> > My impression is that mountain biking is not gaining in popularity,

at
> > least not here in the NE US. The numbers seem pretty constant.


>
> Since then the bikes, the trails, and the skills required
> to handle each have become increasingly refined, specialized
> and technical, to an intimidating (at least to tyros) degree.
> In short, I think the 'freeride' style may have pretty well
> killed the old concept of mountain biking. And the current
> bikes themselves are pretty expensive as well as elaborate,
> which is quite a dis-incentive to anyone who just plain wants
> to hop on a bike and go.


I don't know. I think it's like road biking where some may feel the
need for an "entry level" $2-3K bike, but at the same time $500-1000
buys much more than it ever did (even more value in MTB stuff). As a
contrary development, I think there's a movement in the MTB community
to put some of the fun back by getting rid of some of the geegaws.

Downhill/Freeride bikes are specialized, but you really need a ski lift
or a pickup. I occasionally run into some clueless guy clanking up a
trail in body armor and 6" of suspension, but they don't seem to come
back.
 
Maggie wrote:
>
> I think comfort bikes are growing more and more popular as this baby
> boom generation gets out there to ride. Just my humble opinion. As

a
> Boomer looking for a comfortable ride. ;-)


Comfort bikes tend to be typically what new riders buy. It seems like a
year later they all either graduate to a better performing bike or stop
riding.
 
Peter Cole wrote:

> > I suppose if you only ride for fitness, road biking would be the

way
> to go since it's, as you say, a more consistent workout. I'm a big

fan
> of mountain biking, mainly because I enjoy the outdoors and

sightseeing.
> Improved fitness is a benefit, I suppose, but if fitness is all
> you're after you can spend $80 on a pair of running shoes and get as

good of> a workout, if not better, than you'll get on a bike.
>
> While you knees last.


Good point. I've tried running - both on a treadmill and on the road.
I stopped because it always feels like a chore to me. But when I hop
on my mountain bike, it's more of an adventure. The way I figure it,
if you're doing something to get fit, it might as well be fun, right?
Of course, some people actually have fun jogging around a cold track at
dawn, so to each his own, I suppose.

That being said, I would be willing to give trail running a try, as
long as the scenery was nice. I'm still young enough for it at 25.
Heck, I might even take up mountain climbing!

-Bill H.
 
Maggie wrote:

> ...
> I think comfort bikes are growing more and more popular as this baby
> boom generation gets out there to ride. Just my humble opinion. As a
> Boomer looking for a comfortable ride. ;-)


There is always the option of going over to the dark side.

Get Bent!

--
Tom Sherman - Earth
 
Tom Keats wrote:

> This is just speculation on my part, but I can envision
> the popularity of 'mountain biking' declining. I think
> originally (back in the '80s), casual enthusiasts were
> mostly into not too technical singletrack, and perhaps
> some back-country touring, while the more avid riders
> would advance into cross country or downhill competition....


Being a clumsy oaf, I would like to live in a place with relatively easy
single-track, since I usually walk the difficult parts to avoid broken
bones. Fire roads perhaps - I could even ride those on my trike.

--
Tom Sherman - Earth
 
Tom Sherman wrote:
> Maggie wrote:
>
> > ...
> > I think comfort bikes are growing more and more popular as this

baby
> > boom generation gets out there to ride. Just my humble opinion.

As a
> > Boomer looking for a comfortable ride. ;-)

>
> There is always the option of going over to the dark side.
>
> Get Bent!
>
> --
> Tom Sherman - Earth



:) Right back at ya Mr. Earth.
 
Maggie wrote:

> Tom Sherman wrote:
>
>>Maggie wrote:
>>
>>
>>>...
>>>I think comfort bikes are growing more and more popular as this

>
> baby
>
>>>boom generation gets out there to ride. Just my humble opinion.

>
> As a
>
>>>Boomer looking for a comfortable ride. ;-)

>>
>>There is always the option of going over to the dark side.
>>
>>Get Bent!
>>
>>--
>>Tom Sherman - Earth

>
>
>
> :) Right back at ya Mr. Earth.


If you would rather perch way up in the air on a tiny saddle, rather
than recline in comfort on a true seat while cycling, that is your choice.

--
Tom Sherman - Earth