muscle atrophy

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Loki, Feb 7, 2004.

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  1. Loki

    Loki Guest

    So how long does it take for muscles to atrophy given a decide lack of cycling through the dark
    winter season?

    How much 'maintenance' work would be enough to keep the bicycle propulsion system in tune?

    Opinions?

    --
    'And then one day you find, Ten years have got behind you. No one told you when to run You missed
    the starting gun' -pink floyd
     
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  2. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > So how long does it take for muscles to atrophy given a decide lack of cycling through the
    > dark winter season?
    >
    > How much 'maintenance' work would be enough to keep the bicycle propulsion system in tune?
    >
    > Opinions?

    JMO, but I think two or three 30 to 60 minute sessions on a trainer would keep you in decent shape
    until you can back out on the roads. Obviously not race shape, but enough to give you a good base to
    build from when the weather improves.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  3. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    loki wrote:

    > So how long does it take for muscles to atrophy given a decide lack of cycling through the dark
    > winter season?

    I don't know the scientific answer, but my legs have been pretty tired lately, after January's lack
    of riding. They're getting better, though.

    Here's an overview of the effects of detraining:

    http://www.cptips.com/detrain.htm

    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  4. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Sat, 07 Feb 2004 23:54:03 GMT, "loki" <[email protected]> from wrote:

    > So how long does it take for muscles to atrophy given a decide lack of cycling through the
    > dark winter season?

    I think you start losing muscle and cardio gains within two to three weeks. From what I've gathered,
    the cardio is easier to get back.
    >
    > How much 'maintenance' work would be enough to keep the bicycle propulsion system in tune?

    Exercise vigorously at least three times per week for at least 60 minutes per session. I'd do leg
    and core work and some sort of indoor cardio.

    --
    [email protected]
    Infinitesimal gradations.
    17
     
  5. "loki" <[email protected]>
    > So how long does it take for muscles to atrophy given a decide
    lack
    > of cycling through the dark winter season?

    After a six to eight week layoff it takes me about 120 miles, 4 or 5 rides just to get my legs
    somewhat back. Then considerable more time to get back to the condition "pre" dark winter season.

    hth
     
  6. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sat, 07 Feb 2004 23:54:03 GMT, "loki" <[email protected]> wrote
    in message <[email protected]s.com>:

    > So how long does it take for muscles to atrophy given a decide lack of cycling through the
    > dark winter season?

    About a week ;-)

    > How much 'maintenance' work would be enough to keep the bicycle propulsion system in tune?

    Het, don't ask me - winter is just the part of the year when I need lights.

    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://chapmancentral.demon.co.uk
     
  7. W K

    W K Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Het, don't ask me - winter is just the part of the year when I need lights.

    very good. But we're relatively lucky aren't we?

    Prepare yourself though, it might be a bit colder tommorow ... only 37F
     
  8. Loki

    Loki Guest

    "Kevan Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sat, 07 Feb 2004 23:54:03 GMT, "loki" <[email protected]> from
    wrote:
    >
    > > So how long does it take for muscles to atrophy given a decide
    lack
    > >of cycling through the dark winter season?
    >
    > I think you start losing muscle and cardio gains within two to three
    weeks. From
    > what I've gathered, the cardio is easier to get back.
    > >
    > > How much 'maintenance' work would be enough to keep the bicycle
    propulsion
    > >system in tune?
    >
    > Exercise vigorously at least three times per week for at least 60 minutes
    per
    > session. I'd do leg and core work and some sort of indoor cardio.

    I swim through the winter [summer as well actually] so that covers my cardio I guess. I do 1 hour
    sets once or twice a day mebbe every other day on average. I was thinking more about my cycle
    specific muscles. In swimming I consciously do not use my lower body much but concentrate my effort
    on upper body to balance the cycling. I still cycle in winter. It is my method of transport. But
    that is basically the ~20 - in winter at least - minute each way commute to/from work 3-4 times a
    week. I might get out for the odd winter ride but nothing like summer time.

    What brought this thought on was that for Jan. I didn't even do much swimming. I pulled a muslce in
    muscle in my bicep. I havent a freakin' clue as to how I did it. It was just sore as hell. But Jan
    was pretty much a writeoff for exercise in general.

    --
    'And then one day you find, Ten years have got behind you. No one told you when to run You missed
    the starting gun' -pink floyd
     
  9. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Sun, 8 Feb 2004 16:06:52 +0000 (UTC), "W K" <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >> Het, don't ask me - winter is just the part of the year when I need lights.
    >
    >very good. But we're relatively lucky aren't we?
    >
    >Prepare yourself though, it might be a bit colder tommorow ... only 37F

    Hell, we're just recently up to that sort of temperature. It's a heat wave for us here in the
    northeast US. Some of the ice is melting, even.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  10. W K

    W K Guest

    "Rick Onanian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 8 Feb 2004 16:06:52 +0000 (UTC), "W K" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> Het, don't ask me - winter is just the part of the year when I need lights.
    > >
    > >very good. But we're relatively lucky aren't we?
    > >
    > >Prepare yourself though, it might be a bit colder tommorow ... only 37F
    >
    > Hell, we're just recently up to that sort of temperature. It's a heat wave for us here in the
    > northeast US. Some of the ice is melting, even.

    Yes. We are blessed with winters where a daytime temperature of 60F is possible. But plagued with
    summers where daytime temperatures of 60F are probable.
     
  11. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 09:23:43 +0000 (UTC), "W K"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Yes. We are blessed with winters where a daytime temperature of 60F is possible. But plagued with
    >summers where daytime temperatures of 60F are probable.

    "Plagued"???

    Where is this alleged weather-paradise? While 70F would be optimal, I'd settle for 60F days
    all year...
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  12. H. M. Leary

    H. M. Leary Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "W K" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > "Rick Onanian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > On Sun, 8 Feb 2004 16:06:52 +0000 (UTC), "W K" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >> Het, don't ask me - winter is just the part of the year when I need lights.
    > > >
    > > >very good. But we're relatively lucky aren't we?
    > > >
    > > >Prepare yourself though, it might be a bit colder tommorow ... only 37F
    > >
    > > Hell, we're just recently up to that sort of temperature. It's a heat wave for us here in the
    > > northeast US. Some of the ice is melting, even.
    >
    > Yes. We are blessed with winters where a daytime temperature of 60F is possible. But plagued with
    > summers where daytime temperatures of 60F are probable.
    >
    >

    Didn¹t Mark Twain say that:

    ³The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco²

    60F all year??

    Rick! You gotta move south.

    HAND The older I get, the warmer I like it!

    --
    ³Freedom Is a Light for Which Many Have Died in Darkness³

    - Tomb of the unknown - American Revolution
     
  13. W K

    W K Guest

    "Rick Onanian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 09:23:43 +0000 (UTC), "W K" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >Yes. We are blessed with winters where a daytime temperature of 60F is possible. But plagued with
    > >summers where daytime temperatures of 60F are probable.
    >
    > "Plagued"???
    >
    > Where is this alleged weather-paradise? While 70F would be optimal, I'd settle for 60F days
    > all year...

    Its the UK. I may be skewing the ranges slightly (by comparing highest in winter with lowest in
    summer), but 70F is typical for a summer's day and 80F not common.

    If you really want 60F all year round then you could just about get that on the west coast of
    Scotland and Ireland. As these temperatures are achieved by being dipped in a mildly warm ocean,
    bring some waterproofs.
     
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