Muscle mass

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Dec 18, 2005.

  1. Hello group,
    I recently bought a scale which gives the muscle mass,
    body fat and water content. I am trying to figure out the optimum
    muscle mass % and internet was of zero help to me. I would appreciate
    if anyone can post(or give pointers) the muscle mass figures
    categorized by the age.

    Thanks,
    Sam.
     
    Tags:


  2. cguttman

    cguttman Guest

    Hello Sam,

    Do you mean optimal body fat, or optimal muscle mass? I assume that you
    mean body fat...

    Every scale uses its own formula to calculate bodyfat. Hence, you should
    use the body fat chart that comes with the scale. If you use a chart
    provided here or on the internet you scale might show readings which are
    not meaningful in this chart. There are dozens of bodyfat formula that
    assume different variables, such as age, etc.

    However: note that body fat scales are not very accurate. If you can,
    get body fat calipers, or go to your local gym and let them do a body
    composition assessment. This should yield a fairly accurate body fat
    reading.

    Provided that you have an accurate body fat reading, it should be
    between 5-15% (never less than 5%, because it is dangerous). Apparantly,
    the average American has an average of 25%-35% body fat - far too much.

    Hope that helps, Chris


    [email protected] wrote:

    > Hello group,
    > I recently bought a scale which gives the muscle mass,
    > body fat and water content. I am trying to figure out the optimum
    > muscle mass % and internet was of zero help to me. I would appreciate
    > if anyone can post(or give pointers) the muscle mass figures
    > categorized by the age.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Sam.
    >
     
  3. [email protected] wrote:
    > Hello group,
    > I recently bought a scale which gives the muscle mass,
    > body fat and water content. I am trying to figure out the optimum
    > muscle mass % and internet was of zero help to me. I would appreciate
    > if anyone can post(or give pointers) the muscle mass figures
    > categorized by the age.


    Believe it or not, nobody on these ngs has ESP. After reading your
    post, I do NOT have a clue as to what you are talking about. Perhaps,
    if you were to articulate your question better?

    Sounds to me like you want to know how much body fat (or BMI) is
    optimal. But, you sure as heck have not stated that in your question.
    Then the next unanswered question would be: Optimal for what? You did
    not specify.

    Just thought that you might want to know.
     
  4. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    "cguttman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > However: note that body fat scales are not very accurate. If you can,
    > get body fat calipers, or go to your local gym and let them do a body
    > composition assessment. This should yield a fairly accurate body fat
    > reading.


    Hydrostatic weighing is about the only accurate way to calculate percent
    of fat. Calipers and those other handy dandy toys are so far off to
    trust.

    >
    > Provided that you have an accurate body fat reading, it should be
    > between 5-15% (never less than 5%, because it is dangerous).
    > Apparently, the average American has an average of 25%-35% body fat -
    > far too much.


    I'm 60 and have 10%. In my 40's I was 8%. I simply eat balanced and do
    endurance trail running.

    -DF
     
  5. cguttman

    cguttman Guest

    Hi Doug,

    > Hydrostatic weighing is about the only accurate way to calculate percent
    > of fat. Calipers and those other handy dandy toys are so far off to
    > trust.


    True. I didnt mention hydrostatic weighing because it is not pratical
    (and still not 100% accurate).

    I think calipers are more practical and do a good job in measuring body
    fat, and most likely calipers do a better job than body fat scales.

    Chris
     
  6. MMu

    MMu Guest

    "cguttman" <[email protected]> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi Doug,
    >
    >> Hydrostatic weighing is about the only accurate way to calculate percent
    >> of fat. Calipers and those other handy dandy toys are so far off to
    >> trust.

    >
    > True. I didnt mention hydrostatic weighing because it is not pratical (and
    > still not 100% accurate).
    >
    > I think calipers are more practical and do a good job in measuring body
    > fat, and most likely calipers do a better job than body fat scales.
    >


    Quality of caliper data depends a lot on the experience and training of the
    person measuring it- it can be quite precise in fact (but usually not for
    individual measurements but for groups).
     
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