Must-have tools for home use?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by William Blum, Oct 18, 2003.

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  1. William Blum

    William Blum Guest

    Okay, so I've been given some degree of freedom with respect to my next major bike shopping
    excursion, and I was thinking of getting a decent set of tools to work on my bike(s).

    Any suggestions for "must-have" items?

    I'm already planning to get a work stand. I've got a complete set of box-end wrenches, and the
    like. I'm just looking for recommendations for those bike tools that I won't realize I need until
    the time comes.

    (For reference: I currently own a Giant Cypress ST as my primary bike, and have a Fuji and a Schwinn
    frame in the garage for later rebuilding. Next spring, I'll be getting a bike for my wife, and a
    bike for each kid.)
     
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  2. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >
    >Any suggestions for "must-have" items?

    A torque wrench that goes down to about 25 inch-pounds.

    I've found that bolts rated below 100 inch pounds are *really* easy to shear off....OTOH, maybe I'm
    a klutz... but I'm at the point now where I never tighten one of those little puppies "by hand".
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  3. Q.

    Q. Guest

    Here are some things that I use constantly ...

    Well, not sure what size hex wrenches you need ... but if you need 4, 5 & 6 mm wrenches, get one
    of the "Y" shaped all in one wrenches. Actually, get two. They come in very handy. I use this one
    all the time:

    http://store.airbomb.com/Itemdesc.asp?ic=TL4101

    Nicely made product ... got it at Dick's Sporting Goods. Available in other size combinations too
    I believe.

    A truing stand, and a very good spoke wrench as well IMHO. True, you can true on the bike but I've
    been using a stand since I was 10 and I wouldn't give it up for anything. A bad spoke wrench will
    ruin your day, not to mention your spokes by rounding them off.

    A refillable oil can perhaps? Not a must have, but useful none the less. You know, the old fashioned
    type to get into little spots and squirt in just the right amount.

    Tire levers

    Cheep brushes for cleaning off gunk and dirt.

    Chain whip.

    I'm sure others will think up more,

    HTH,
    C.Q.C.

    "William Blum" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Okay, so I've been given some degree of freedom with respect to my next major bike shopping
    > excursion, and I was thinking of getting a decent set
    of
    > tools to work on my bike(s).
    >
    > Any suggestions for "must-have" items?
    >
    > I'm already planning to get a work stand. I've got a complete set of box-end wrenches, and the
    > like. I'm just looking for recommendations for those bike tools that I won't realize I need until
    > the time comes.
    >
    > (For reference: I currently own a Giant Cypress ST as my primary bike,
    and
    > have a Fuji and a Schwinn frame in the garage for later rebuilding. Next spring, I'll be getting a
    > bike for my wife, and a bike for each kid.)
     
  4. Grenouil

    Grenouil Guest

    "William Blum" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Okay, so I've been given some degree of freedom with
    respect to my next
    > major bike shopping excursion, and I was thinking of
    getting a decent set of
    > tools to work on my bike(s).
    >
    > Any suggestions for "must-have" items?
    >
    > I'm already planning to get a work stand. I've got a
    complete set of
    > box-end wrenches, and the like. I'm just looking for
    recommendations for
    > those bike tools that I won't realize I need until the
    time comes.
    >
    > (For reference: I currently own a Giant Cypress ST as my
    primary bike, and
    > have a Fuji and a Schwinn frame in the garage for later
    rebuilding. Next
    > spring, I'll be getting a bike for my wife, and a bike for
    each kid.)
    >
    >
    Depends what you think you'll work on - not all of these are "must have " - until you need one.....

    Allen wrenches - set of eight(?) Cassette removal tool (and appropriate wrench to fit) Chainwhip
    Spoke wrenches Cone wrenches (two of each size you think you'll need) Cartridge BB removal tool
    Crank puller (with insert for splined cranks) Chain breaker Headset wrench 15mm wrench for pedals
    Chainring nut key (holds the nut while you turn the bolt) Tire levers Cable cutter (although you can
    get away with a saw for outers and a sharp chisel/steel plate for inners) - or buy a 'Dremel' tool
    Rubber hammer....................... :))

    For older bikes..... Freewheel removal tool - at least the splined version BB pin spanner BB
    lockring wrench BB fixed cup wrench (if you even need to remove/reinstall one)
     
  5. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Sat, 18 Oct 2003 18:12:12 -0400, "William Blum" <[email protected]> may
    have said:

    >Okay, so I've been given some degree of freedom with respect to my next major bike shopping
    >excursion, and I was thinking of getting a decent set of tools to work on my bike(s).
    >
    >Any suggestions for "must-have" items?

    Chain breaker, spoke wrenches, cone wrenches, the special sockets for the cassette(s) or
    freewheel(s) for your bikes, crank extractor, spanner and sockets as appropriate for your BB, more
    or less in that order. Those should suffice for the majority of routine maintenance chores and minor
    repairs, in addition to what you likely already have.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail. Yes, I have a killfile. If I
    don't respond to something, it's also possible that I'm busy.
     
  6. Onefred

    Onefred Guest

    Well, the others have mentioned just about everything. I think a good tool to have around is a
    headset press used for pressing races into the head tube. A very inexpensive alternative is to buy a
    seven to eight inch long 7/8" bolt w/two matching washers and nut.
    7/8" washers will cover any size headset. I've done this and it works quite well. I paid $3 for this
    hardware at home depot.

    Dave
     
  7. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    "William Blum" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Okay, so I've been given some degree of freedom with respect to my next major bike shopping
    > excursion, and I was thinking of getting a decent set of tools to work on my bike(s).
    >
    > Any suggestions for "must-have" items?
    >
    > I'm already planning to get a work stand. I've got a complete set of box-end wrenches, and the
    > like. I'm just looking for recommendations for those bike tools that I won't realize I need until
    > the time comes.
    >
    Hi, have you considered any of the kits that are available? Granted they do come with some tools,
    that most of us already have, or in the case of adjustable wrenches, frown upon. But they do seem to
    have a lot of the essentials, for a decent price. I plan on buying one of the kits that sell for
    around $45, claimed to retail for $79-99. I think it is a good starting point and then I would
    eventually replace/duplicate the tools that you find, that you use regularly, with higher quality
    versions. For some kits, see link, the one I was referring to is the Big Tool Kit 2.
    http://www.nashbar.com/results.cfm?category=99&subcategory=1232&storetype=&estoreid=&init=y

    Life is Good! Jeff
     
  8. Adam Rush

    Adam Rush Guest

    "William Blum" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Okay, so I've been given some degree of freedom with respect to my next major bike shopping
    > excursion, and I was thinking of getting a decent set of tools to work on my bike(s).
    >
    > Any suggestions for "must-have" items?
    >
    > I'm already planning to get a work stand. I've got a complete set of box-end wrenches, and the
    > like. I'm just looking for recommendations for those bike tools that I won't realize I need until
    > the time comes.

    You must have the PW-3. It is a useful for servicing pedals as for, as my first boss found,
    delegating corporal punishment to would-be thieves.
     
  9. Grenouil

    Grenouil Guest

    "onefred" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Well, the others have mentioned just about everything. I
    think a good tool to have around
    > is a headset press used for pressing races into the head
    tube. A very inexpensive
    > alternative is to buy a seven to eight inch long 7/8" bolt
    w/two matching washers and nut.
    > 7/8" washers will cover any size headset. I've done this
    and it works quite well. I paid
    > $3 for this hardware at home depot.
    >
    > Dave
    >
    A headset press is expensive - it's unlikely you'll be doing many. Same is true for headset removal
    tools. Easiest to take it to your LBS if you ever need either of these services - cost me $10 at REI
    for a headset and BB fixed cup removal. The DIY bolt/washer/nut approach works for headset assembly
    if you're careful.
     
  10. William Blum wrote:

    > Okay, so I've been given some degree of freedom with respect to my next major bike shopping
    > excursion, and I was thinking of getting a decent set of tools to work on my bike(s).
    >
    > Any suggestions for "must-have" items?
    >
    > I'm already planning to get a work stand. I've got a complete set of box-end wrenches, and the
    > like. I'm just looking for recommendations for those bike tools that I won't realize I need until
    > the time comes.
    >
    > (For reference: I currently own a Giant Cypress ST as my primary bike, and have a Fuji and a
    > Schwinn frame in the garage for later rebuilding. Next spring, I'll be getting a bike for my wife,
    > and a bike for each kid.)
    >
    >
    I stripped a Cannondale this afternoon and used:

    Lots of Allen keys (I have a full set from 1.5mm to 10mm) Shimano bottom bracket tool Shimano crank
    puller (get the "mushroom" adaptor too if you have Hollowtech cranks) Big adjustable spanner for use
    with the above two tools Cable cutters Two headset spanners of the right size - if yours is
    threadless you don't need these Pedal spanner

    On older bikes with cup-and-cone BBs you may need a full set of bottom bracket tools - expensive
    and large!

    For servicing, as opposed to dismantling whole assemblies, you also need:

    Two hub cone spanners Screwdrivers Various small spanners (for things like pedal bearing locknuts)
    Spoke key For grease something like Castrol LM automotive bearing grease is fine. I've used the
    expensive bike-specific ones but they're no better. Anti-seize compound is better for seatposts,
    stem quills, pedal threads etc and is vital on any titanium threads. I use threadlock on crank bolts
    and a few other places. It has some anti-seize properties too. I've never found anything that works
    better than 3-in-1 oil for chains, if "works" is defined as a quiet smooth-running chain.

    The truly obsessive will add headset fitting and removal tools, but these are so expensive that you
    might as well get the bike shop to do the job.

    A wheel jig and dishing stick are useful, but you can do basic truing in the bike frame.

    And on the road I carry:

    Tyre levers Spare tube Puncture repair kit Multi-tool (which can even be used to tighten 14mm crank
    bolts) Hand wipes Pump or, if I'm on the racing bike or MTB, a CO2 canister. I've had to use CO2
    twice - it works provided you have large low pressure tyres or narrow high pressure tyres. If you
    have fat high pressure tyres like some MTB slicks, avoid drain covers and potholes on the way home
    or you'll feel the rim hit the tarmac (ouch).

    Roger
     
  11. Jay Beattie

    Jay Beattie Guest

    "William Blum" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Okay, so I've been given some degree of freedom with respect to my next major bike shopping
    > excursion, and I was thinking of getting a decent set
    of
    > tools to work on my bike(s).
    >
    > Any suggestions for "must-have" items?
    >
    > I'm already planning to get a work stand. I've got a complete set of box-end wrenches, and the
    > like. I'm just looking for recommendations for those bike tools that I won't realize I need until
    > the time comes.
    >
    > (For reference: I currently own a Giant Cypress ST as my primary bike,
    and
    > have a Fuji and a Schwinn frame in the garage for later rebuilding. Next spring, I'll be getting a
    > bike for my wife, and a bike for each kid.)
    >

    $.98 stiff bristle parts cleaning brush and a good shop light so you can see everything you dropped
    on to the floor and into the piles of sludge you just knocked off your bike. I also have a little
    roll-around office chair and a stereo-hi-fi just to make things more comfy and convenient in my
    basement shop. These are optional. If you live in a wet climate, fleet maintenance during the fall
    and winter can be a part time job. -- Jay Beattie.
     
  12. I'll agree with the whole nashbar big tool kit 2 recommendation. It's perfect.. and you can easily
    start adding to it when you realize you need more things..

    Mike http://mikebeauchamp.com

    "Jeff Starr" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "William Blum" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Okay, so I've been given some degree of freedom with respect to my next major bike shopping
    > > excursion, and I was thinking of getting a decent
    set of
    > > tools to work on my bike(s).
    > >
    > > Any suggestions for "must-have" items?
    > >
    > > I'm already planning to get a work stand. I've got a complete set of box-end wrenches, and the
    > > like. I'm just looking for recommendations
    for
    > > those bike tools that I won't realize I need until the time comes.
    > >
    > Hi, have you considered any of the kits that are available? Granted they do come with some tools,
    > that most of us already have, or in the case of adjustable wrenches, frown upon. But they do seem
    > to have a lot of the essentials, for a decent price. I plan on buying one of the kits that sell
    > for around $45, claimed to retail for $79-99. I think it is a good starting point and then I would
    > eventually replace/duplicate the tools that you find, that you use regularly, with higher quality
    > versions. For some kits, see link, the one I was referring to is the Big Tool Kit 2.
    >
    http://www.nashbar.com/results.cfm?category=99&subcategory=1232&storetype=&estoreid=&init=y
    >
    > Life is Good! Jeff
     
  13. > Okay, so I've been given some degree of freedom with respect to my next major bike shopping
    > excursion, and I was thinking of getting a decent set of tools to work on my bike(s).
    >
    > Any suggestions for "must-have" items?

    All the replys have good suggestions, but no wrench worth his spoke nipples should be without a high
    quality, possibly forged tool steel, bottle cap lifter! Pedros is my current favorite, both hand
    held and wall mounted units are available. Really. I ain't kiddin'. Beer is important!!! --Jim
     
  14. Ant

    Ant Guest

    [email protected] (Jeff Starr) wrote in message
    > >
    > Hi, have you considered any of the kits that are available?

    'couldnt agree more. i now have what seems like a more than complete set of name brand bike tools,
    but i remember my roots. i started off with the nashbar big tool kit, and still think it was (and
    remains) an unbeatable value. i still use some of those tools every single day.

    i remember four years ago i walked into my LBS with the nashbar catalog and asked them if they had a
    toolset like the nashbar one. they didnt beleive it sold for as cheap as it did. i showed them the
    page, and they scratched their head and shrugged, and told me they didnt have anything like that and
    they couldnt come close to matching
    it. too bad. i bet LBSs could sell a lot of those kits if QBP would distribute them instead of the
    100$+ kits from pedros/park/etc.

    off the top of my head, if i were to start from scratch, i would get

    -nash big tool kit -park cable/housing cutter -park spoke wrench in appropriate size for your
    wheels, or get the park mul;ti-size one if you do different bikes -metric combination wrenches/allen
    keys. if youre only going to have one set of allen keys, i think that ball ends and "y"
    configurations are a mistake. ymmv.

    a simple lockring wrench, like the hozan one, goes a long way, too. less so with the contemporary
    headset and bb standards. nice for fixies!

    some normal hand tools make life easier too. rubber mallet, hammer, pliers, vice grips, that kind of
    stuff. did you already buy the stand? if i were starting out, i would rather spend the stand money
    on tools. i think tools go a lot further than a workstand. ill opt for hanging the bike from the
    rafters or otherwise improvising if i could drop a hundred bucks on tools instead.

    and then add as your bicycle dictates.

    other vitals: tub of auto grease motor oil penetrating oil of some sort i also very much like
    tri-flo for lubing cables, moving parts. decent lube, and less messy than the motor oil for exposed
    bits. some loose bearings degreaser. i like deisel, if theres no one around to complain abotu the
    smell. rags, from the wastebin of the local laundromat.

    fin, anthony
     
  15. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "ant" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > if i were starting out, i would rather spend the stand money on tools. i think tools go a lot
    > further than a workstand. ill opt for hanging the bike from the rafters or otherwise improvising
    > if i could drop a hundred bucks on tools instead.

    I agree, and I'd add that if you have a trainer, you can use that as a stand. It's particularly
    useful for drivetrain adjustment, as you can actually ride the bike between adjustments.

    > off the top of my head, if i were to start from scratch, i would get

    > -park cable/housing cutter

    I don't know, the reviews have been kind of bad
    http://www.mtbreview.com/reviews/Tools/product_23436.shtml

    Personally, I think a Dremel with a fiber-reinforced cutoff wheel works great for cutting housing,
    perhaps a bit slower, but cutting housing isn't that common a task, and the Dremel is pretty handy
    for lots of other stuff.
     
  16. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    is there a bike club nearby?? maybe a memebr hasa third hand catalog to read. their gone but the
    catalog isa terrific manual for basic tool thought
     
  17. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    [snip]

    > Personally, I think a Dremel with a fiber-reinforced cutoff wheel works great for cutting housing,
    > perhaps a bit slower, but cutting housing isn't that common a task, and the Dremel is pretty handy
    > for lots of other stuff.

    Dear Peter,

    At last, a fellow Dremo-phile!

    Give me a place to stand and a lever long enough and I will move the world --Archimedes

    Give me a Dremel tool and enough cut-off wheels and I'll cut it in half.

    Carl Fogel
     
  18. Wayne Menzie

    Wayne Menzie Guest

  19. Ant

    Ant Guest

    "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > I don't know, the reviews [of the park cable cutter] have been kind of bad
    > http://www.mtbreview.com/reviews/Tools/product_23436.shtml

    well, i admit i havent shopped around. the only other cable/housing cutter i used was park's old
    one, which was a POS. at the time when i boguht this one, the shimano was too expensive, the pedros
    didnt have a picture online at the site i was ordering from, and the others looked cheesy. the one i
    use is this one

    http://www.parktool.com/tools/CN_10.shtml is that the one they're talkign about?

    it cuts inner cables cleanly. outer housing generally takes two snips. one to cut the housing. one
    to cut the burr off. you end up with a nice cut, doesnt take but a second or two. i use this tool
    something like 30 times a day most days, and i dont see it getting dull soon, nor can i think of
    anything i would want to change. maybe i just got a good one..

    (actually, the one thing i would change is a different design on the wire that flips over the handle
    to keep the tool closed. every once in a while, it orients itself in such a way that closing the
    tool to cut some housing compresses this wire, and then it pops out of the tool and flies across the
    room. its happened dozens of times, but ive miraculously found it every time ;)

    anthony
     
  20. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    [email protected] (g.daniels) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > is there a bike club nearby?? maybe a memebr hasa third hand catalog to read. their gone but the
    > catalog isa terrific manual for basic tool thought

    Dear Gene,

    I miss the Third Hand catalogue, too.

    But the company is still in business as Loose Screws (formerly the Third Hand) and offers tools,
    just without the wonderful pictures and comments.

    http://www.loosescrews.com

    Perhaps they'll get the old catalogue going again.

    Carl Fogel
     
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