mustard greens?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Jennyanniedots, Sep 11, 2005.

  1. Hi everyone,
    I recently bought some mustard greens at the local Asian supermarket,
    and I'm not sure what to do with them. I'm not sure if there are
    varying degrees of mustard green age/bitterness, so I'll describe -
    they're very bright green (lettuce colored), fairly tender looking
    stalks.

    I'm not sure what to do with them - I guess I'd either steam them in
    chicken broth or stir fry them as a first stab. I've read a few
    southern recipes involving slabs of bacon fat, which I'm not inclinded
    to try. (Don't get me wrong - I love a good slab of bacon - but I like
    that they look so healthy and flavorful on their own.) So I'm
    wondering, do you guys like to stir fry them, boil them.....and what
    kinds of sauce do you like on top?

    Thanks in advance,
    Jen
     
    Tags:


  2. notbob

    notbob Guest

    On 2005-09-11, Jennyanniedots <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm not sure what to do with them - I guess I'd either steam them in
    > chicken broth or stir fry them as a first stab. I've read a few
    > southern recipes involving slabs of bacon fat, which I'm not inclinded
    > to try. (Don't get me wrong - I love a good slab of bacon - but I like
    > that they look so healthy and flavorful on their own.) So I'm
    > wondering, do you guys like to stir fry them, boil them.....and what
    > kinds of sauce do you like on top?


    If you just want to enjoy the greens for their own sake, pull the
    leaves from ribs in pieces and wash. With nothing but the water from
    the washed leaves (don't bother to drain) put them in a pan w/ lid and
    let them cook at low heat for about 1 to 1-1/2 hrs. Add a little
    water if original water completely evaporates. When done, add salt &
    pepper or some hot sauce and enjoy.

    nb
     
  3. modom

    modom Guest

    On 11 Sep 2005 15:50:12 -0700, "Jennyanniedots" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Hi everyone,
    >I recently bought some mustard greens at the local Asian supermarket,
    >and I'm not sure what to do with them. I'm not sure if there are
    >varying degrees of mustard green age/bitterness, so I'll describe -
    >they're very bright green (lettuce colored), fairly tender looking
    >stalks.
    >
    >I'm not sure what to do with them - I guess I'd either steam them in
    >chicken broth or stir fry them as a first stab. I've read a few
    >southern recipes involving slabs of bacon fat, which I'm not inclinded
    >to try. (Don't get me wrong - I love a good slab of bacon - but I like
    >that they look so healthy and flavorful on their own.) So I'm
    >wondering, do you guys like to stir fry them, boil them.....and what
    >kinds of sauce do you like on top?
    >
    >Thanks in advance,
    >Jen


    I'm from the south, so keep that in mind as you read this.

    First, you have to wash them. Fill the sink with water. Your sink is
    spotlessly clean isn't it? *ahem* Toss in the greens and agitate the
    lot. A lot. Haul the greens out to a colander or something, look at
    the grit that washed out, and drain the sink. Then do it again. And
    maybe again. As needed. Gritty greens are not good. I know. I've
    had them. After you've de-gritted the greens, slap them on a large
    cutting board and give them a rough chop treatment. Put a little
    olive oil in a deep pot and add about half an onion, diced. Cook the
    onions till they start to brown and toss in some seasoning meat.
    Bacon is good. So is tasso if you have it. I know you didn't want to
    use pork fat, but even just a little adds depth and deliciousness to a
    mess of greens. Anyhow, tasso is always very lean. Next add the
    chopped greens and a few cloves of garlic (minced) and some salt and a
    little water. You don't have to cover the greens with water; they'll
    cook way down. Like spinach does. Way down. Cover the pot and
    simmer the greens for about 35 minutes. You need to check the pot now
    and again to be sure it doesn't cook dry. They'll get tender and
    tasty, but they need to cook longer than more tender green stuff like
    spinach to get that way.

    Serve them warm with some hot pepper vinegar on the side for folks to
    use as they see fit. Trappy's makes good pepper vinegar, but you can
    make it, too. Gather and wash some fresh hot chiles like serranos
    (the classic is green cayenne, but that's not a likely score at most
    stores); fill a jar with them. Salt them liberally. Bring some apple
    cider vinegar almost to a boil and pour it over the peppers. Let it
    cool. Cover it and refrigerate overnight. A splash of the juice over
    mustard greens is really good.

    modom
     
  4. salgud

    salgud Guest

    Jennyanniedots wrote:
    > Hi everyone,
    > I recently bought some mustard greens at the local Asian supermarket,
    > and I'm not sure what to do with them. I'm not sure if there are
    > varying degrees of mustard green age/bitterness, so I'll describe -
    > they're very bright green (lettuce colored), fairly tender looking
    > stalks.
    >
    > I'm not sure what to do with them - I guess I'd either steam them in
    > chicken broth or stir fry them as a first stab. I've read a few
    > southern recipes involving slabs of bacon fat, which I'm not inclinded
    > to try. (Don't get me wrong - I love a good slab of bacon - but I like
    > that they look so healthy and flavorful on their own.) So I'm
    > wondering, do you guys like to stir fry them, boil them.....and what
    > kinds of sauce do you like on top?
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    > Jen


    I had a friend who made a very successful mistake using mustard greens.
    He was preparing ordeurves (?) for a large company party, something he
    had never attempted before, and wanted to have the classic spinach dip
    you used to see so often at parties. He went to the store and bought
    what he thought was spinach, went home and made up a huge bowl of what
    he thought was spinach dip from a recipe he found somewhere. As he was
    cleaning up, he picked up the cellophone wrappings from what he thought
    was spinach, (see a patterne here?) and noticed he'd used mustard
    greens instead of spinach (surprise!) He freaked out, but tried the
    dip. It was delicious! I had a lot of it at the party, thought it was
    odd tasting spinach dip (good odd), and asked him about it after, when
    he told me the story. I've always thought about making some someday,
    but never have. It certainly was delicious, and the whole huge bowl got
    devoured without any complaints.
     
  5. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    salgud wrote:
    > Jennyanniedots wrote:
    >> Hi everyone,
    >> I recently bought some mustard greens at the local Asian supermarket,
    >> and I'm not sure what to do with them.


    >> Thanks in advance,
    >> Jen

    >
    > I had a friend who made a very successful mistake using mustard
    > greens. He was preparing ordeurves (?) for a large company party,
    > something he had never attempted before, and wanted to have the
    > classic spinach dip you used to see so often at parties. He went to
    > the store and bought what he thought was spinach, went home and made
    > up a huge bowl of what he thought was spinach dip from a recipe he
    > found somewhere. As he was cleaning up, he picked up the cellophone
    > wrappings from what he thought was spinach, (see a patterne here?)
    > and noticed he'd used mustard greens instead of spinach (surprise!)
    > He freaked out, but tried the dip. It was delicious! I had a lot of
    > it at the party, thought it was odd tasting spinach dip (good odd),
    > and asked him about it after, when he told me the story. I've always
    > thought about making some someday, but never have. It certainly was
    > delicious, and the whole huge bowl got devoured without any
    > complaints.


    Now there's a "cooking mistake" that turned into a success story! I like
    stories like this one! Thanks for sharing it.

    Jill
     
  6. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    salgud wrote:
    > Jennyanniedots wrote:
    >> Hi everyone,
    >> I recently bought some mustard greens at the local Asian supermarket,
    >> and I'm not sure what to do with them.


    >> Thanks in advance,
    >> Jen

    >
    > I had a friend who made a very successful mistake using mustard
    > greens. He was preparing ordeurves (?) for a large company party,
    > something he had never attempted before, and wanted to have the
    > classic spinach dip you used to see so often at parties. He went to
    > the store and bought what he thought was spinach, went home and made
    > up a huge bowl of what he thought was spinach dip from a recipe he
    > found somewhere. As he was cleaning up, he picked up the cellophone
    > wrappings from what he thought was spinach, (see a patterne here?)
    > and noticed he'd used mustard greens instead of spinach (surprise!)
    > He freaked out, but tried the dip. It was delicious! I had a lot of
    > it at the party, thought it was odd tasting spinach dip (good odd),
    > and asked him about it after, when he told me the story. I've always
    > thought about making some someday, but never have. It certainly was
    > delicious, and the whole huge bowl got devoured without any
    > complaints.


    Now there's a "cooking mistake" that turned into a success story! I like
    stories like this one! Thanks for sharing it.

    Jill
     
  7. I think perhaps what I have is "baby mustard greens." They are very
    light green and tender, and they do not resemble spinach. They would
    cook in a very short amount of time (not 1.5 hours as someone
    previously mentioned). I bought them at an Asian market.
    -jen
     
  8. salgud

    salgud Guest

    Jennyanniedots wrote:
    > I think perhaps what I have is "baby mustard greens." They are very
    > light green and tender, and they do not resemble spinach. They would
    > cook in a very short amount of time (not 1.5 hours as someone
    > previously mentioned). I bought them at an Asian market.
    > -jen


    Obviously you've never had "normal" Southern cooking. I don't mean the
    stuff you get in gourmet cookbooks, but the stuff you get served in the
    little cafes in the tiny towns off the beaten path. Everything which
    isn't fried in 50W motor oil is cooked for at least an hour and a half,
    then put on the plate with the puddle of grease from the fried food.
    "Hell, them's damn fine vittles y'all!"
     
  9. Bob Myers

    Bob Myers Guest

    "salgud" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Obviously you've never had "normal" Southern cooking. I don't mean the
    > stuff you get in gourmet cookbooks, but the stuff you get served in the
    > little cafes in the tiny towns off the beaten path. Everything which
    > isn't fried in 50W motor oil is cooked for at least an hour and a half,
    > then put on the plate with the puddle of grease from the fried food.
    > "Hell, them's damn fine vittles y'all!"


    My wife's from Texas; I've always kidded her (and her family) about
    the Ultimate Southern Dish being something along the lines of
    salt-encrusted chocolate-covered deep-fried pork rinds, with a side of
    fried okra...


    Bob M.
     
  10. salgud

    salgud Guest

    Bob Myers wrote:
    > "salgud" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Obviously you've never had "normal" Southern cooking. I don't mean the
    > > stuff you get in gourmet cookbooks, but the stuff you get served in the
    > > little cafes in the tiny towns off the beaten path. Everything which
    > > isn't fried in 50W motor oil is cooked for at least an hour and a half,
    > > then put on the plate with the puddle of grease from the fried food.
    > > "Hell, them's damn fine vittles y'all!"

    >
    > My wife's from Texas; I've always kidded her (and her family) about
    > the Ultimate Southern Dish being something along the lines of
    > salt-encrusted chocolate-covered deep-fried pork rinds, with a side of
    > fried okra...
    >
    >
    > Bob M.


    Yes! One of my Southern favs. It's really delicious if you know how to
    cook it right.
     
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