Mustard tastes like horseradish‹›

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Not Available, Mar 7, 2004.

  1. The other day, I ate Colman's mustard.

    It tasted like horseradish! It was hot and made my
    sinuses flare up.

    Someone said, "That's REAL mustard." So what have I been
    eating before?

    I had French's mustard before.

    Is that fake?
     
    Tags:


  2. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Not Available wrote:

    > The other day, I ate Colman's mustard.
    >
    > It tasted like horseradish! It was hot and made my sinuses
    > flare up.
    >
    > Someone said, "That's REAL mustard." So what have I been
    > eating before?
    >
    > I had French's mustard before.
    >
    > Is that fake?

    French's is "prepared mustard". It has its place, like on
    hamburgs and hot dogs, but there are a lot of different
    types of mustard around, most of them having a lot more zip
    than the "prepared" staff. Dijon mustard is quite tasty, but
    is still relatively mild compared to some of the mustards
    out there.
     
  3. [email protected] (Not Available) wrote in news:16737-404B9B1A-207
    @storefull-3313.bay.webtv.net:

    > The other day, I ate Colman's mustard.
    >
    > It tasted like horseradish! It was hot and made my sinuses
    > flare up.
    >
    > Someone said, "That's REAL mustard." So what have I been
    > eating before?
    >
    > I had French's mustard before.
    >
    > Is that fake?
    >
    >

    Mustard seeds vary in their hotness, and the hotness can
    also be altered by preparation method and aging. French's is
    real mustard, but their formulation is mild. I usually
    prefer Colman's.

    Wayne
     
  4. Not Available <[email protected]> wrote:
    : The other day, I ate Colman's mustard.

    : It tasted like horseradish! It was hot and made my sinuses
    : flare up.

    : Someone said, "That's REAL mustard." So what have I been
    : eating before?

    : I had French's mustard before.

    : Is that fake?

    Was this mustard prepared from Colman's mustard
    powder? If so, you can use it to prepare something
    very much like French's mustard--lots of vinegar,
    some turmeric,salt,spices-- or you can mix it with
    only water in such proportion to make something very
    nose challenging. [For me the heat of mustard comes
    through the nose, of ginger through the head, of
    cayenne pepper through the throat.] --thelma
     
  5. "Not Available" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > The other day, I ate Colman's mustard.
    >
    > It tasted like horseradish! It was hot and made my sinuses
    > flare up.
    >
    > Someone said, "That's REAL mustard."

    Yes, if you want the full experience grind your own mustard
    seed, mix with a little water and wait for the flavour to
    develop for 15 minutes, it will lose its strength after a
    few days so you have to mix it fresh each time.

    > So what have I been eating before?
    >
    > I had French's mustard before.
    >
    > Is that fake?
    >

    The intense flavour agents in fresh mustard are not
    chemically stable on their own. Commercial pre-prepared
    mustards may or may not go to some trouble to try to
    stabilise those flavours but they diminish with age
    regardless.

    This URL http://www-ang.kfunigraz.ac.at/~katzer/engl/
    explains some of this and refers to Colman mustard.

    David
     
  6. Sd

    Sd Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Not Available) wrote:

    > The other day, I ate Colman's mustard.
    >
    > It tasted like horseradish! It was hot and made my sinuses
    > flare up.
    >
    > Someone said, "That's REAL mustard." So what have I been
    > eating before?
    >
    > I had French's mustard before.
    >
    > Is that fake?

    There are many kinds of mustard. Some of them really mellow
    out as they get older. People also tend to keep mustard a
    long time because it does not spoil easily (if at all), so
    sometimes the smoothing out of the taste occurs so gradually
    it's not very noticeable. Buy a brand new jar of a good
    dijon mustard and try that out. Then let it sit a few weeks
    and try it again. Your sinuses will thank you (later). :)

    sd
     
  7. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    >sd sd55117 says:

    y.webtv.net>,
    > [email protected] (Not Available) wrote:
    >
    >> The other day, I ate Colman's mustard.
    >>
    >> It tasted like horseradish! It was hot and made my
    >> sinuses flare up.
    >>
    >> Someone said, "That's REAL mustard." So what have I been
    >> eating before?
    >>
    >> I had French's mustard before.
    >>
    >> Is that fake?
    >
    >There are many kinds of mustard. Some of them really mellow
    >out as they get older.

    There are also different types of mustard seed... the type
    used to prepare Chinese style mustard is far more potent
    than the type used for preparing typical table mustards...
    and many are a blend.

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED
    NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life would be
    devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  8. Dog3

    Dog3 Guest

    [email protected] (PENMART01) deliciously posted in
    news:[email protected]:

    >>sd sd55117 says:
    >
    > y.webtv.net>,
    >> [email protected] (Not Available) wrote:
    >>
    >>> The other day, I ate Colman's mustard.
    >>>
    >>> It tasted like horseradish! It was hot and made my
    >>> sinuses flare up.
    >>>
    >>> Someone said, "That's REAL mustard." So what have I been
    >>> eating before?
    >>>
    >>> I had French's mustard before.
    >>>
    >>> Is that fake?
    >>
    >>There are many kinds of mustard. Some of them really
    >>mellow out as they get older.
    >
    > There are also different types of mustard seed... the type
    > used to prepare Chinese style mustard is far more potent
    > than the type used for preparing typical table mustards...
    > and many are a blend.

    Very good info Sheldon. I'm a mustard fanatic but know very
    little about
    it. I love the stuff and the best mustard is the mustard I
    make myself. I've also bought $9 jars of the stuff from
    Dierbergs or Straub's Market.

    I have a question or maybe just a remark. I used the
    powdered mustard mixed with a bit of water to make the hot
    mustard I find in Chinese restaurants. Is this correct? It
    tastes very similar and the heat is about the same.

    Michael
    --
    Deathbed statement...

    "Codeine . . . bourbon." ~~Tallulah Bankhead, actress, d.
    December 12, 1968
     
  9. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On 08 Mar 2004 01:27:24 GMT, [email protected] (PENMART01) wrote:

    >Btw, Colman's mustard powder is NOT pure mustard, it's
    >composed of about 15% wheat flour... so those who have
    >problems ingesting wheat products beware.

    Wrong, as usual. Their 'genuine' superfine product contains
    1% wheat flour, but their regular, default mustard does not
    contain *any* wheat flour whatsoever, just mustard and
    mustard flour.

    -sw

    >
    >Here is a good resource:
    >http://www.ilhawaii.net/~danrubio/mustard
    >
    >
    >---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED
    >NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life would be
    >devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  10. Dog3 <[email protected];not> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > [email protected] (PENMART01) deliciously posted in news:[email protected]
    > m15.aol.com:
    >
    >>>sd sd55117 says:
    >>
    >> y.webtv.net>,
    >>> [email protected] (Not Available) wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> The other day, I ate Colman's mustard.
    >>>>
    >>>> It tasted like horseradish! It was hot and made my
    >>>> sinuses flare up.
    >>>>
    >>>> Someone said, "That's REAL mustard." So what have I
    >>>> been eating before?
    >>>>
    >>>> I had French's mustard before.
    >>>>
    >>>> Is that fake?
    >>>
    >>>There are many kinds of mustard. Some of them really
    >>>mellow out as they get older.
    >>
    >> There are also different types of mustard seed... the
    >> type used to prepare Chinese style mustard is far more
    >> potent than the type used for preparing typical table
    >> mustards... and many are a blend.
    >
    > Very good info Sheldon. I'm a mustard fanatic but know
    > very little about it. I love the stuff and the best
    > mustard is the mustard I make myself. I've also bought $9
    > jars of the stuff from Dierbergs or Straub's Market.
    >
    > I have a question or maybe just a remark. I used the
    > powdered mustard mixed with a bit of water to make the hot
    > mustard I find in Chinese restaurants. Is this correct? It
    > tastes very similar and the heat is about the same.
    >
    > Michael

    That's what I do, too, Michael. Authentic? I dunno, but it
    tastes right. Most Chinese mustards that I am familiar with
    contain no vinegar, only water.

    Wayne
     
  11. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On 08 Mar 2004 02:41:13 GMT, [email protected] (PENMART01) wrote:

    >>[email protected] spurts:
    >>
    >>>(PENMART01) wrote:
    >>>
    >>>Btw, Colman's mustard powder is NOT pure mustard, it's
    >>>composed of about 15% wheat flour... so those who have
    >>>problems ingesting wheat products beware.
    >>
    >>Wrong, as usual. Their 'genuine' superfine product
    >>contains 1% wheat flour, but their regular, default
    >>mustard does not contain *any* wheat flour whatsoever,
    >>just mustard and mustard flour.

    >You forgot to click here, putz:
    >>>Here is a good resource:
    >>>http://www.ilhawaii.net/~danrubio/mustard
    >
    >Sqwertz is such an imbecile he can't use an URL..
    >
    >Q: Can you tell me the ingredients and nutritional
    > information for Colman's Mustard?
    >
    >A: I sure can! The ingredients are: ground mustard seed
    > (w/o bran), and mustard flour. Here is the rest of the
    > nutritional info for one teaspoon:
    >
    >Calories - 60 Fat Calories - 5 Total Fat - 1/2 gram (1%
    >daily value) Sodium - 200 mg (8% daily value) Total Carb. -
    >6 grams Sugar - 1 gram protein - 0 ***Those of you who are
    >allergic to wheat flour*** The Double Superfine(DSF)
    >mustard has *18% wheat flour*. The Genuine Double
    >Superfine(GDX) has 1% wheat flour.

    Exactly what I said, you babbling imbecile. Their regular
    mustard powder doesn't have *any* flour but their superfine
    products do apparently. I have a can that does not list
    wheat flour as in ingredient.

    -sw
     
  12. Yeff

    Yeff Guest

    On Mon, 08 Mar 2004 01:15:15 -0000, Dog3 wrote:

    > I have a question or maybe just a remark. I used the
    > powdered mustard mixed with a bit of water to make the hot
    > mustard I find in Chinese restaurants. Is this correct? It
    > tastes very similar and the heat is about the same.

    I learned somewhere (lost in time) to go 3-2-1: three parts
    mustard powder, two parts soy sauce, one part water. Let sit
    for an hour and then enjoy.

    -Jeff B. yeff at erols dot com
     
  13. Lea B

    Lea B Guest

    Not Available wrote:
    > The other day, I ate Colman's mustard.
    >
    > It tasted like horseradish! It was hot and made my sinuses
    > flare up.

    Probably English mustard when you're used to the milder
    French ( or American ) forms.

    I like Hot English Mustard, but then I like the hit you get
    from Wasabi too. It's why I don't try drugs :)
     
  14. Rick & Cyndi

    Rick & Cyndi Guest

    "lea b" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    : Not Available wrote:
    : > The other day, I ate Colman's mustard.
    : >
    : > It tasted like horseradish! It was hot and made my
    : > sinuses
    flare up.
    :
    : Probably English mustard when you're used to the
    : milder French
    ( or
    : American ) forms.
    :
    : I like Hot English Mustard, but then I like the hit you
    : get
    from Wasabi too.
    : It's why I don't try drugs :)
    :
    :
    ================

    Speaking of Wasabi, I've been eating Wasabi Peas like
    they're candy. Yummmmmm!!!!
    --
    Cyndi <Remove a "b" to reply
     
  15. "Rick & Cyndi" <[email protected]> wrote in news:qoU2c.202495
    [email protected]_s51:

    > "lea b" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > berlin.de...
    >: Not Available wrote:
    >: > The other day, I ate Colman's mustard.
    >: >
    >: > It tasted like horseradish! It was hot and made my
    >: > sinuses
    > flare up.
    >:
    >: Probably English mustard when you're used to the
    >: milder French
    > ( or
    >: American ) forms.
    >:
    >: I like Hot English Mustard, but then I like the hit
    >: you get
    > from Wasabi too.
    >: It's why I don't try drugs :)
    >:
    >:
    > ================
    >
    > Speaking of Wasabi, I've been eating Wasabi Peas like
    > they're candy. Yummmmmm!!!!

    You mean they're NOT candy? <G
     
  16. Paula

    Paula Guest

    if you are using dry mustard powder to mix your own ,then
    instead of using water try mixing it up with milk or a
    little cream, much nicer.
     
  17. Paula

    Paula Guest

    if you are using dry mustard powder to mix your own ,then
    instead of using water try mixing it up with milk or a
    little cream, much nicer.
     
  18. Paula

    Paula Guest

    if you are using dry mustard powder to mix your own ,then
    instead of using water try mixing it up with milk or a
    little cream, much nicer.
     
  19. Dog3

    Dog3 Guest

    Yeff <[email protected]> deliciously posted in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Mon, 08 Mar 2004 01:15:15 -0000, Dog3 wrote:
    >
    >> I have a question or maybe just a remark. I used the
    >> powdered mustard mixed with a bit of water to make the
    >> hot mustard I find in Chinese restaurants. Is this
    >> correct? It tastes very similar and the heat is about
    >> the same.
    >
    > I learned somewhere (lost in time) to go 3-2-1: three
    > parts mustard powder, two parts soy sauce, one part water.
    > Let sit for an hour and then enjoy.
    >
    > -Jeff B. yeff at erols dot com
    >

    That's interesting. 3-2-1. I've never used soy sauce. I
    don't know what proportions I've been using but I stir the
    water in until the consistency is the way I like it. I do
    let it sit for a bit before using. Thanks for the tip.

    Michael
    --
    Deathbed statement...

    "Codeine . . . bourbon." ~~Tallulah Bankhead, actress, d.
    December 12, 1968
     
  20. Dog3

    Dog3 Guest

    Yeff <[email protected]> deliciously posted in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Mon, 08 Mar 2004 01:15:15 -0000, Dog3 wrote:
    >
    >> I have a question or maybe just a remark. I used the
    >> powdered mustard mixed with a bit of water to make the
    >> hot mustard I find in Chinese restaurants. Is this
    >> correct? It tastes very similar and the heat is about
    >> the same.
    >
    > I learned somewhere (lost in time) to go 3-2-1: three
    > parts mustard powder, two parts soy sauce, one part water.
    > Let sit for an hour and then enjoy.
    >
    > -Jeff B. yeff at erols dot com
    >

    That's interesting. 3-2-1. I've never used soy sauce. I
    don't know what proportions I've been using but I stir the
    water in until the consistency is the way I like it. I do
    let it sit for a bit before using. Thanks for the tip.

    Michael
    --
    Deathbed statement...

    "Codeine . . . bourbon." ~~Tallulah Bankhead, actress, d.
    December 12, 1968
     
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