my 8 speed Shimano 105 STI lever died - SOS

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Paul Nevai, Apr 19, 2004.

  1. Paul Nevai

    Paul Nevai Guest

    I have a 1992 Bridgestone RB 1 with an 8 speed Shimano 105
    STI lever which died [the right one]. Now what?

    Please advise me about the best resolution of the problem.
    Money is not a problem if spent prudently.

    E.g., can I just buy a new 9 speed Shimano 105 STI lever
    and have it adjusted it to work with 8 speed? Or should
    I buy a Shimano Sora STI set? I would even be willing
    to buy an Ultegra STI set if it can be made to work
    with 8 speeds.

    Please advise me. Many thanks, Paul
     
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  2. Kyle.B.H

    Kyle.B.H Guest

    "Paul Nevai" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have a 1992 Bridgestone RB 1 with an 8 speed Shimano 105
    > STI lever which died [the right one]. Now what?
    >
    > Please advise me about the best resolution of the problem.
    > Money is not a problem if spent prudently.
    >
    > E.g., can I just buy a new 9 speed Shimano 105 STI lever
    > and have it
    adjusted
    > it to work with 8 speed? Or should I buy a Shimano Sora
    > STI set? I would even be willing to buy an Ultegra STI set
    > if it can be made to work with 8 speeds.
    >
    > Please advise me. Many thanks, Paul

    Paul,

    You can stay with 8 speed, but that means buying Sora
    (Shimano 9 speed shifters will not work). They're good
    levers, a different up-shifting mechansim, but it may not be
    worth putting more money into 8 speed components.

    For about $50 more, you could upgrade to 9 speed by buying
    only the right shifter (Tiagra, 105, Ultegra), and then
    replacing your rear cassette and chain, although it may be
    difficult to find just a right shifter, and possibly just as
    expensive as buying the pair. That's it. Don't let any bike
    shop tell you that you have to replace the derailers or
    crankset, becuase you don't.

    Kyle
     
  3. 2me-<< I have a 1992 Bridgestone RB 1 with an 8 speed
    Shimano 105 STI lever which died [the right one]. Now what?
    >><BR><BR>

    A set of Veloce 9s levers and rear der, a shimano 9s cogset
    and chain-go ride-

    2me-<< E.g., can I just buy a new 9 speed Shimano 105 STI
    lever and have it adjusted it to work with 8 speed?
    >><BR><BR>

    Yes if you space the cogset to 9s spacing or just buy a 9s
    right lever and cogset and chain.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali
    costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>,
    Paul Nevai <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I have a 1992 Bridgestone RB 1 with an 8 speed Shimano 105
    >STI lever which died [the right one]. Now what?
    >
    >Please advise me about the best resolution of the problem.
    >Money is not a problem if spent prudently.

    If the shifter is just losing stops, ie, you move the lever
    to shift and it just swings freely past the point where it
    should have clicked, that is very often just sticky grease
    in the ratchet and immersing the shifter in solvent and
    blowing it out with compressed air will often fix it.
    Shimano 7 and 8 speed shifters (both road and mountain)
    often have this problem, after a certain age it becomes
    quite prevalent.

    After cleaning, I lube it with Tri Flow or similar very
    light lube and work the action 100 times. If it doesn't work
    I soak it overnight and do it again. It's amazing some times
    how they will come back after extraordinary efforts to
    resuscitate.

    If the shifter is really dead, then going to 9-speed is the
    best spent money. Replace shifters, chain and cassette.
    Buying more 8-speed is just investing in obsolescence unless
    you have some strong reason why you need it - nobody should
    be nostalgic for 8-speed Shimano :)

    --Paul
     
  5. [email protected] (Paul Nevai) wrote:
    >I have a 1992 Bridgestone RB 1 with an 8 speed Shimano 105
    >STI lever which died [the right one]. Now what?

    When my '93 Ultegra 8-speed right shifter died a couple of
    years ago, I took the opportunity to upgrade to 9-speed (I
    bought the 9-speed upgrade kit from Colorado Cyclist).
    Certainly not the cheap option, but a good investment if you
    ride often and plan on keeping the bike for a while.

    Michael
     
  6. Paul Nevai

    Paul Nevai Guest

    Michael Press <[email protected]> aszonygya:
    :[email protected] (Paul Nevai) wrote:
    :>I have a 1992 Bridgestone RB 1 with an 8 speed Shimano 105
    :>STI lever which died [the right one]. Now what?
    :
    :When my '93 Ultegra 8-speed right shifter died a couple of
    years ago, :I took the opportunity to upgrade to 9-speed (I
    bought the 9-speed :upgrade kit from Colorado Cyclist).
    Certainly not the cheap option, :but a good investment if
    you ride often and plan on keeping the bike :for a while.

    Yes, but would my 8-speed 1992 Bridgestone RB 1 frame accept
    9 speeds? Isn't there a difference of a couple of
    millimeters which could matter? Best regards, Paul
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>,
    Paul Nevai <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Michael Press <[email protected]> aszonygya:
    >:[email protected] (Paul Nevai) wrote:
    >:>I have a 1992 Bridgestone RB 1 with an 8 speed Shimano
    >:>105 STI lever which died [the right one]. Now what?
    >:
    >:When my '93 Ultegra 8-speed right shifter died a couple of
    >years ago, :I took the opportunity to upgrade to 9-speed (I
    >bought the 9-speed :upgrade kit from Colorado Cyclist).
    >Certainly not the cheap option, :but a good investment if
    >you ride often and plan on keeping the bike :for a while.
    >
    >Yes, but would my 8-speed 1992 Bridgestone RB 1 frame
    >accept 9 speeds? Isn't there a difference of a couple of
    >millimeters which could matter?

    No, they are the same. The only caveat is that many 8-speed
    freehubs are not designed to work with 11-tooth cogs
    (hyperglide compact) and would require a 1mm spacer under
    the cassette. The frame spacing for 8 and 9 speed is 130mm.
    In fact 10 speed is 130mm as well.

    --Paul
     
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