My Brain is Full

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by teton explorer, Jul 26, 2005.

  1. teton explorer

    teton explorer New Member

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    This may be a somewhat lengthy post, but please stay with me . . . I could use your help.

    I'm a 42 year old father of 2 who is sporting about 15 extra pounds. I stay active and work out quite a bit, but I haven't cycled in about 20 years. I recently started down the path of shopping for a bike because a friend of mine who is an avid racer offered me his 1 year old Scott CR1 Pro Centaur for $1,250. Problem is, it is a 56 and I'm definitely a 58, so the fit just wasn't right. However, it started me thinking that I should get a bike and get in better shape.

    Because I had been considering a Scott CR1 Pro, I started looking at other bikes in that "class." I rode a high end Trek, a comparable Giant, and a Orbea Onix. The Orbea fit the best so I had decided to buy it. Then the thought occured to me: "you aren't a racer and never will be. What the hell are you doing spending $3,200 on a bike." Funny thing, no one at the bike shops said this to me. They were all happy to sell me a fairly "hard core" racing bike even though I told them that I would be able to get out for an hour one or two days per week (three at the most), that I'd be riding for fitness with a friend or two, and that I would not be climbing any mountain peaks.

    I then started looking for a bike with the characteristics (1) I actually need, and (2) would be able to appreciate given the type of riding I intend to do. Specifically, I looked for a bike that was confortable but somewhat fast on the flats. I have almost decided to buy a Specialized Roubaix. Questions: (1) do you think I'll be happy with this bike; and (2) assuming the answer is "yes," would you recommend the Elite or the Comp.

    Thanks for your input. I apologize in advance for the typos that are bound to be located throughout this post. I'm too lazy to proof read.
     
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  2. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    (1) Probably yes. It sounds like a good match for the riding you intend to do. (2) Depends on your budget. There's no real functional differnce between the 105 components on the Elite and the DA/Ultegra components on the Comp. It's mostly weight and money.
     
  3. frenchyge

    frenchyge New Member

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    I'm not familiar with the Specialized line, so I can't comment specifically on your choice. My general feeling, though, is that a beginner is going to appreciate any properly fit bike with skinny tires. My advice is to buy the cheapest road bike with brake lever shifters that you can find.

    I used to *love* blowing by riders on expensive bikes back when I rode my $500 Trek 1000.
     
  4. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    Of course not. It's money out of their pocket.

    If you plan on staying at the recreational and fitness level of cyclist and are only planning to ride 3 hours per week, you don't even need that expensive of a bike.

    It's just too difficult to recommend bikes via a forum. Too hard to sum up what a person really needs. The Roubaix does have high praise from its owners though.
     
  5. cmoore992002

    cmoore992002 New Member

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    That Orbea is a bunch of bike to get re-started with. The LBS would love for you to buy it. I try to ride every day 15 to 20 miles and have been doing so for about 15 months. My ride is an entry level Motobecane Road Bike. After doing some upgrades I have about 1300.00 to 1400.00 invested in the bike. The upgrades included wheels, tires and bottom bracket. The bike serves me very well for my purpose which is fun and exercise. Shop around and really think about what you plan to do with the bike. It is real easy to get seduced by those beautiful expensive bikes.
     
  6. nun

    nun New Member

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    I'm is similar circumstances to you, I'm 43, 25lbs over weight and used to cycle in college. I tried a couple of Road bikes when thinking of buying a new bike and found that I just wasn't comfortable with the geometry. So I tried bikes with a touring geometry and got the handle bars up level or just below the seat and I felt a lot more comfortable. I also went away from the skinny seats and broke in a Brooks leather saddle which has lived up to all the praise it got from the long distance tourists I spoke to at the LBS. I ended up with a fairly inexpensive Bianchi Volpe which has been a workhorse commuting and weekend bike for the last few years. I've used it as a learning experience and changed many components so that when I come to buy the next bike I won't be a novice and I'll be able to specify just what I want. I don't look as cool as the young guys on the more radical bikes, but I get my work out and at 43 I think the dignity of a tourer with some slightly vintage touches is cool in its own way.
     
  7. 50mph

    50mph New Member

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    Nun has a good point. The specialized has the most comfortable geometry of a road bike that i know of, but you should try out the straight handle bar bikes of lemiux has a nice one, bianchi, felt offers a ton of bang for the buck. I have a feeling your lowerback will thank you. There is no reason for you to buy a hardcore racing bike, you will be much more comfortable on a touring bike. Not a hybrid though.
     
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