my eyeballs are cold....

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Superslacker, Jan 23, 2003.

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  1. Superslacker

    Superslacker Guest

    So it's getting a bit chilly in Chicago this time of year, and I'm pretty well equipped for my 2nd
    winter of commuting, but as it's dipping into the teens (F) I'm realizing that the only exposed
    'skin', my eyes, are starting to get really freaking cold, especially with these pleasant headwinds.
    I don't know what people normally do, but I'm just going to get out my old ski goggles and pop them
    on. Should keep me nice and toasty. Is that pretty much my only option? How about old-style aviator
    goggles? My waterbottle is a slushee by the time i get to work/home; I'd hate to have that happen to
    my eyeballs.

    I've tried my sunglasses during the day, but the problem is with my balaclava thing I fog the
    glasses up each time I exhale. Said fog promptly freezes on lenses. Not practical. Also, maybe I
    don't use this thing right, but breathing through it just sucks. So my second question is, are there
    any better face/nose things out there that I should check out? Or just cut a mouth hole in this one,
    so I don't fog up my sunglasses? And will sunglasses really make a difference anyway, or should I
    just stick with the goggles?

    I'm curious to hear from other winter riders out there.Everything else I've pretty much got covered.
    feet: toasty; fingers: toasty; I don't know how much colder it's going to get,but I 'd like to stick
    it out the whole winter.

    TIA -Stephane in balmy Chicago
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>, superslacker <[email protected]> wrote:
    >So it's getting a bit chilly in Chicago this time of year, and I'm pretty well equipped for my 2nd
    >winter of commuting, but as it's dipping into the teens (F) I'm realizing that the only exposed
    >'skin', my eyes, are starting to get really freaking cold, especially with these pleasant
    >headwinds. I don't know what people normally do, but I'm just going to get out my old ski goggles
    >and pop them on. Should keep me nice and toasty.

    Sounds good to me. I considered picking up some ski goggles when faced with the same problem, but
    then figured I'd see if I could find something cheaper at the local hardware store to try first.
    And I've been happy enough with a pair of sub-$10 safety googles ever since. The only problems I've
    had so far:

    1. The height of the goggles makes them a snug fit between my nose and the front of my helmet; I
    have to push the helmet back a bit, and they still push down harder than I'd like on my nose.
    2. They decrease visibility to the side. Shoulder checks require me to turn my neck around farther
    than before.

    I haven't had any problems with fogging, but then I don't think I've ever used them for more than 15
    minutes at a time. Anyway, between the goggles and balklava I'm pretty comfortable (though my nose
    still sticks out a bit...).

    Oh, and I may well look completely ridiculous. I wouldn't know. It'd all be part of the fun
    in any case.

    >I'm curious to hear from other winter riders out there.Everything else I've pretty much got
    >covered. feet: toasty; fingers: toasty; I don't know how much colder it's going to get,but I 'd
    >like to stick it out the whole winter.

    I'm still having thumb problems. I have some pretty heavy mittens that keep my fingers warm, but the
    only way to keep my thumbs warm is to periodically curl them up inside my fists in the main part of
    the mittens. I alternate sides and ride one-handed while I'm doing this. Kind of awkward.

    -Bruce F.
     
  3. Max

    Max Guest

    "superslacker" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > So it's getting a bit chilly in Chicago this time of year, and I'm
    pretty
    > well equipped for my 2nd winter of commuting, but as it's dipping
    into the
    > teens (F) I'm realizing that the only exposed 'skin', my eyes, are
    starting
    > to get really freaking cold,
    [...]
    > -Stephane in balmy Chicago

    Hi Stephane,

    I'm about 40 miles west of you, cycling between Aurora and Batavia. I use safety glasses, these, in
    fact http://www.keysan.com/pictures/zcbt8688.jpg and a lightweight, open mesh, two layer balaclava.
    The balaclava has a small panel for breathing which helps a little, but i get condensation too.

    I find it helps to pull the opening below my nose and breath out thru my nose which directs most of
    the moisture away from the glasses. Still, if i'm not careful about breathing i get fogged up. I
    would recommmend you stay away from a full goggle, I think you'd be even more likely to fog up.

    I wait until my core temp is up and my peripheral circulation is increased before pulling down the
    balaclava to expose my snoot.

    I think there's probably nothing you can do that will eliminate condensation, but exposing your
    nose and breathing out thru it will go a long way towards making things better. Until your nose
    freezes off...

    Good luck!

    .max
     
  4. superslacker wrote:
    > So it's getting a bit chilly in Chicago this time of year, and I'm pretty well equipped for my 2nd
    > winter of commuting, but as it's dipping into the teens (F) I'm realizing that the only exposed
    > 'skin', my eyes, are starting to get really freaking cold, especially with these pleasant
    > headwinds. I don't know what people normally do, but I'm just going to get out my old ski goggles
    > and pop them on. Should keep me nice and toasty. Is that pretty much my only option? How about
    > old-style aviator goggles? My waterbottle is a slushee by the time i get to work/home; I'd hate to
    > have that happen to my eyeballs.

    > I've tried my sunglasses during the day, but the problem is with my balaclava thing I fog the
    > glasses up each time I exhale. Said fog promptly freezes on lenses. Not practical. Also, maybe I
    > don't use this thing right, but breathing through it just sucks. So my second question is, are
    > there any better face/nose things out there that I should check out? Or just cut a mouth hole in
    > this one, so I don't fog up my sunglasses? And will sunglasses really make a difference anyway, or
    > should I just stick with the goggles?

    > I'm curious to hear from other winter riders out there.Everything else I've pretty much got
    > covered. feet: toasty; fingers: toasty; I don't know how much colder it's going to get,but I 'd
    > like to stick it out the whole winter.

    Normally, I wear a polartech balaclava and a polartech headband under my helmet (tight fit!) and
    wrap a long scarf around. This leaves a little slit between the scarf covering my mouth, nose, and
    chin and the polartech stuff on my head/forehead. That's what I see through. It reduces peripheral
    vision, and I can't wear my glasses because of the fogging effect of exhaled air. The exhale from
    my mouth wafts up over my eyes and keeps them warm enough, I guess. I have the luxury of living
    west of where I work, so the ride in the morning when it's coldest is with the wind. Not sure how
    this would work into the wind. Haven't had a super cold ride home yet. I'm not sure what you could
    do if you were blind without your glasses. Maybe the goggles would work, although I'd think they'd
    fog up as well.

    Scott in Madison
     
  5. superslacker wrote:

    > I'm curious to hear from other winter riders out there.Everything else I've pretty much got
    > covered. feet: toasty; fingers: toasty; I don't know how much colder it's going to get,but I 'd
    > like to stick it out the whole winter.

    I'm doing OK so far (7 degrees for the morning commute in) with a polartec balaclava and
    hat over it.

    I have clear (and dark) safety glasses that I bought at the local hardware store for eyewear. They
    wrap around the corner of my face so provide good shielding from wind, which has been fairly strong
    these past couple days.

    So far no problems with fogging though. I leave the glasses on the bike in the barn over night, so
    they are as cold as ambient air. The primary factor in no fog has probably been that I have so far
    been able to wear the balaclava with lower opening below my nose and mouth, so exhalation goes
    pretty much completely away from my face.

    If it gets even colder, with attendant wind chills (currently in the -20F range), I may have to
    button up even more, perhaps causing more of a fogging problem.

    When/if that happens, I'll look into the anti-fog sprays you can buy at many sporting/skiing
    centers. They're supposed to work quite well.

    But so far so good. Of course I completely fog up as soon as I enter the building to carry my bike
    up to my office, but the stairwell is pretty simple, and largely empty, so I haven't gotten lost or
    collided with anyone yet during my "blind" final distance to work!

    SMH
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>, Pete Hickey
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I wear regular eyeglasses, and maybe that blocks the wind somewhat, but when cold, I just blink
    >more frequently. It warms up the eyes.
    >
    >I see people wearing goggles, but I never have. For me, it isn't worth it.

    I remembering seeing other people say the same thing. Are our eyes really that different, or can
    they get acclimated to cold, or what? For me, riding at over about 10 mph when it's down to around
    10F becomes intensely painful after only a few moments. It's not a subtle thing, and neither
    blinking nor regular eyeglasses help.

    --Bruce F.
     
  7. Superslacker

    Superslacker Guest

    Yeah. What triggered my whole question was a day last week it was in the low teens (F), and I rode
    home in a 14mph headwind with no goggles or anything. I blinked alot, but by the time I got home my
    eyes were really red, and for the next few days they were just super crusty in the mornings, like
    grape nuts almost.(Slight exaggeration...maybe...) So, I started wearing the old ski goggles, and
    while I'm sure I look like I'm going scuba diving or something, I'm really rather comfortable. I'm
    also surprised at all the people saying simple clear safety lenses or that sort of thing work
    well... I'll probably look into that.

    I suppose maybe I'll get acclimated to cooler stuff... Unfortunately, it looks like we're about to
    get a 'heat wave' in the next few days... ohwell...

    "J. Bruce Fields" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Pete Hickey
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >I wear regular eyeglasses, and maybe that blocks the wind somewhat, but when cold, I just blink
    > >more frequently. It warms up the eyes.
    > >
    > >I see people wearing goggles, but I never have. For me, it isn't worth it.
    >
    > I remembering seeing other people say the same thing. Are our eyes really that different, or can
    > they get acclimated to cold, or what? For me, riding at over about 10 mph when it's down to around
    > 10F becomes intensely painful after only a few moments. It's not a subtle thing, and neither
    > blinking nor regular eyeglasses help.
    >
    > --Bruce F.
     
  8. So...barring the wind in your eyes, you have two probs:

    Bright sunlight making ya squint

    Heavy exhale making sunglasses (see point 1) fog up...

    hmmm...

    ...this is gonna sound a little nutso, but what about those cheap "louver" sunshades they sell at
    the 1$ stores? You know, the kind that don't have any lenses, but instead are like venetian
    blinds...they shade your eyes from direct sunlight, but have no lenses to fog up...whadaya think?
     
  9. Pete Hickey

    Pete Hickey Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, superslacker <[email protected]> wrote:
    >So it's getting a bit chilly in Chicago this time of year, and I'm pretty well equipped for my 2nd
    >winter of commuting, but as it's dipping into the teens (F) I'm realizing that the only exposed
    >'skin', my eyes, are starting to get really freaking cold, especially with these pleasant
    >headwinds.

    I wear regular eyeglasses, and maybe that blocks the wind somewhat, but when cold, I just blink more
    frequently. It warms up the eyes.

    I see people wearing goggles, but I never have. For me, it isn't worth it.

    > How about old-style aviator goggles? My waterbottle is a slushee by the time i get to work/home;
    > I'd hate to have that happen to my eyeballs.

    You'll have much worse problems with other parts before your eyeballs freeze. What may happen, is
    that a bit of moisture on the eyelashes will freeze two eyelashes together when you blink, keeping
    the eye closed. But this doesn't happen in temperatures as warm as you are talking about.

    >balaclava thing I fog the glasses up each time I exhale. Said fog promptly freezes on lenses.

    Are you sure it is your breathing that foggs the lenses? Check if it is on the inside or uotside.
    The body releases heat around the eyes, and moist air from the skin hits the inside of lenses,
    condenses and freezes. Many people mistake this for their breath.

    >I'm curious to hear from other winter riders out there.Everything else I've pretty much got
    >covered. feet: toasty; fingers: toasty; I don't know how much colder it's going to get,but I 'd
    >like to stick it out the whole winter.

    If you are too warm everywhere else, your body will release a lot of heat on teh face, fogging up
    everything. I prefer to ride comfortably cold.

    --
    --
    LITTLE KNOWN FACT: Did you know that 90% of North Americans cannot taste the difference between
    fried dog and fried cat?
     
  10. Brian Sanderson wrote:
    > So...barring the wind in your eyes, you have two probs:

    > Bright sunlight making ya squint

    > Heavy exhale making sunglasses (see point 1) fog up...

    > hmmm...

    > ...this is gonna sound a little nutso, but what about those cheap "louver" sunshades they sell at
    > the 1$ stores? You know, the kind that don't have any lenses, but instead are like venetian
    > blinds...they shade your eyes from direct sunlight, but have no lenses to fog up...whadaya think?

    If you exhale onto the lenses, I think the buildup of ice crystals would eventually fill up the
    louvers. If it's sub-zero, that is (F). I normally don't have problems with fogging glasses 'til
    it's below around 10 or so, as that's when I wrap a scarf around my head. Above 10, I don't think
    covering a nose/chin is necessary.

    Scott (-8F this morning)
     
  11. Pete Hickey

    Pete Hickey Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    J. Bruce Fields <[email protected]> wrote:
    >In article <[email protected]>, Pete Hickey
    ><[email protected]> wrote:

    >>I see people wearing goggles, but I never have. For me, it isn't worth it.
    >
    >I remembering seeing other people say the same thing. Are our eyes really that different, or can
    >they get acclimated to cold, or what?

    I couldn't say. I've never used anyone elses.

    > For me, riding at over about 10 mph when it's down to around 10F becomes intensely painful after
    > only a few moments. It's not a subtle thing, and neither blinking nor regular eyeglasses help.

    For me, I have ridden down to -35F, just with regular glasses. A bit of a sting when the wind blows,
    but not enough to stop me from riding.

    --
    The following address is not valid: [email protected] It is there as an experiment to see
    if email spammers scan content as well as headers.

    --
    Pete Hickey | [email protected] | "If a vegetarian eats Communication Services | or (if
    desperate) | vegatables, then what University of Ottawa | | does a humanitarian Ottawa,Ont. Canada
    K1N 6N5| (613) 562-5800 x 1008 | eat?"
     
  12. Barry Gaudet

    Barry Gaudet Guest

    superslacker <[email protected]> wrote:
    : So it's getting a bit chilly in Chicago this time of year, and I'm pretty well equipped for my 2nd
    : winter of commuting, but as it's dipping into the teens (F) I'm realizing that the only exposed
    : 'skin', my eyes, are starting to get really freaking cold, especially with these pleasant
    : headwinds.

    Yah. Me too. Though I must say it's not the cold per se that bothers me but the precip. On my
    Wednesday commute there was a driving snow, not a light fluffy snow, but a more icey form. I found
    that that stung my eyes. I tried glasses too but they fogged as they did with you.

    But I suppose that doesn't help you though.

    --
    'People think I'm insane because I am frowning all the time All day long I think of things
    but nothing seems to satisfy' 'Make a joke and I will sigh And you will laugh and I will
    cry' -Black Sabbath
     
  13. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "superslacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > So it's getting a bit chilly in Chicago this time of year, .... my eyes,
    are starting
    > to get really freaking cold

    We had a winter fashion show at the Evanston Bike Club (Chicago area) last week, and the top models
    were wearing ....
    (a) Safety glasses, the type you would wear if you were, say, sawing wood, purchased at hardware
    stores, or
    (b) Visorgogs, which is a particular brand of lab glasses you can find in scientific supply catalogs
    [big enough so normal eyeglasses fit underneath], or
    (c) Ski goggles. The guy who had these had glued a little fringe of Polartec fabric around the
    outside, so that the plastic / foam against his face wasn't as cold. His only complaint with ski
    goggles was that they cut his peripheral vision a bit.

    I don't have a fogging problem as long as I am moving; my Visorgogs will fog up a bit at stoplights,
    but the fogging disappears once I'm moving again.

    I've heard putting a very, very light coat of Joy dish soap on the lens will prevent fogging.

    The choice of no eye covering VS eyeglasses VS goggles of some sort depends on individual
    preference and tolerance for cold. Since you already own the ski goggles, you might as well see if
    they work for you.
     
  14. "Mike Kruger" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "superslacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...

    > I've heard putting a very, very light coat of Joy dish soap on the lens will prevent fogging.

    If you do this, then don't lick the lenses later, with the idea that saliva will also prevent
    fogging. Voice of experience here.

    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky ([email protected]) Home of the meditative cyclist at:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
     
  15. Gary Truax

    Gary Truax Guest

    "superslacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I don't know what people normally do, but I'm just going to get out my old
    > ski goggles and pop them on. Should keep me nice and toasty. Is that pretty much my only option?
    > How about old-style aviator goggles? -Stephane in balmy Chicago

    This is definitely not a normal solution but thought I would let you know about it.

    I was at Wally World at the end of summer. They had summer sun bill hats on sale for $1. This is
    like a head sweat band with a see thru bill. The bills came in green, blue and yellow. The design is
    to keep the sun out of your eyes but to let light thru them.

    I bought the yellow one, I had one with a blue visor. This works remarkably well for me. I do not
    ride around a lot of cars at night. This could cause a problem at that time. I just put it on my
    head, pull it down and look through the bill to see where I am going when I need the protection from
    the wind in my eyes. I live in a very hilly area so half the time I need it and when climbing it is
    out of the way and only fogs on the very tip of the bill so far. Ridden in 15 F weather. Also keeps
    the snow from hitting your eyes. I have used it in the rain and it is great about keeping rain off
    your glasses.

    Gary
     
  16. Pete Hickey

    Pete Hickey Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Claire Petersky
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >"Mike Kruger" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    >> I've heard putting a very, very light coat of Joy dish soap on the lens will prevent fogging.

    >If you do this, then don't lick the lenses later, with the idea that saliva will also prevent
    >fogging. Voice of experience here.

    Then, instead of Joy, use one of those good tasting lemon flavored diswashing detergent.

    Just don't use dishwasher detergent. If you think Joy tastes bad, then you should try dishwasher
    detergent.

    --
    --
    LITTLE KNOWN FACT: Did you know that 90% of North Americans cannot taste the difference between
    fried dog and fried cat?
     
  17. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Gary Truax" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > I was at Wally World at the end of summer. They had summer sun bill hats on sale for $1. This is
    > like a head sweat band with a see thru bill. The bills came in green, blue and yellow. The design
    > is to keep the sun out of your eyes but to let light thru them.
    >
    > I bought the yellow one, I had one with a blue visor. This works remarkably well for me. I do not
    > ride around a lot of cars at night. This could cause a problem at that time. I just put it on my
    > head, pull it down and look through the bill to see where I am going when I need the protection
    > from the wind in my eyes. I live in a very hilly area so half the time I need it and when climbing
    > it is out of the way and only fogs on the very tip of the bill so far. Ridden in 15 F weather.
    > Also keeps the snow from hitting your eyes. I have used it in the rain and it is great about
    > keeping rain off your glasses.

    I find that just a visor equipped helmet works well in the same way. I've never understood why
    "road" helmet lack visors, while "mountain bike" helmets all have them, should be the other
    way around.

    I tried ski goggles (over glasses), worked great for a thermal solution, but cut down too much on
    peripheral vision. On really cold/blowing days, I get the "gravel eye" thing. My eyes get completely
    bloodshot and feel like they have grit in them.
     
  18. I use a balaclava stretched so that it is not ocvering my moth or nose. Then I wear a loose-weave
    scarf around my face, adjusted so that the scarf is a couple of inches from both my nose and mouth,
    with the top angled out so that any breath coming out of the top angles away. This seems to work
    well protecting my face and in preheating the cold air before I breath it without fogging my
    glasses. Worked so far down into the high single digits. Only hassle is that you have to rotate the
    scarf 45 degrees every 15 minutes as it becomes saturated with moisture. However, I find I don't
    need it after I'm warmed up.

    I do know about the cold eyeball problem. In the past, my prescription glasses weren't always enough
    to keep my eyes warm. But now I'm wearing the new style of tiny prescription glasses. They seem to
    work much better. I guess becase they are closer to my face and eyes, keeping more wind out.

    -Pete
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>, "Peter Cole"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Gary Truax" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > I was at Wally World at the end of summer. They had summer sun bill hats on sale for $1. This is
    > > like a head sweat band with a see thru bill. The bills came in green, blue and yellow. The
    > > design is to keep the sun out of your eyes but to let light thru them.
    > >
    > > I bought the yellow one, I had one with a blue visor. This works remarkably well for me. I do
    > > not ride around a lot of cars at night. This could cause a problem at that time. I just put it
    > > on my head, pull it down and look through the bill to see where I am going when I need the
    > > protection from the wind in my eyes. I live in a very hilly area so half the time I need it and
    > > when climbing it is out of the way and only fogs on the very tip of the bill so far. Ridden in
    > > 15 F weather. Also keeps the snow from hitting your eyes. I have used it in the rain and it is
    > > great about keeping rain off your glasses.
    >
    > I find that just a visor equipped helmet works well in the same way. I've never understood why
    > "road" helmet lack visors, while "mountain bike" helmets all have them, should be the other
    > way around.

    I do, since I removed the visor from my "mountain bike" helmet. I found it partly blocked my forward
    vision when I was riding on my drop-bar bike. The worst was on a steep descent on my route home,
    where I found myself in full-aero position, looking through the vent-holes in the visor. Visor came
    off pretty quick after that ride. Maybe other visors are less obtrusive or other riders sit on their
    bikes differently. My helmet is a Bell Paradox.

    Mountain bikers like visors because (speculating wildly) they help stop branches from hitting your
    face, they don't block your vision because you're already sitting upright, and they work better than
    sunglasses when you're going in and out of the shadows on your favourite trail.

    > I tried ski goggles (over glasses), worked great for a thermal solution, but cut down too much on
    > peripheral vision. On really cold/blowing days, I get the "gravel eye" thing. My eyes get
    > completely bloodshot and feel like they have grit in them.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  20. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Ryan Cousineau" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, "Peter Cole"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > I find that just a visor equipped helmet works well in the same way. I've never understood why
    > > "road" helmet lack visors, while "mountain bike"
    helmets
    > > all have them, should be the other way around.
    >
    > I do, since I removed the visor from my "mountain bike" helmet. I found it partly blocked my
    > forward vision when I was riding on my drop-bar bike. The worst was on a steep descent on my route
    > home, where I found myself in full-aero position, looking through the vent-holes in the visor.
    > Visor came off pretty quick after that ride. Maybe other visors are less obtrusive or other riders
    > sit on their bikes differently. My helmet is a Bell Paradox.

    My Bell helmet (and the one I had before) allow the visor to be flipped up. I not only ride with
    drop bars on the road, but also often use aerobars, the visor design allows it to be set at a range
    of angles, helpful in reducing sun and headlight glare and keeping rain off my glasses. You do have
    to block the silly vent holes on newer models, though.

    > Mountain bikers like visors because (speculating wildly) they help stop branches from hitting your
    > face, they don't block your vision because you're already sitting upright, and they work better
    > than sunglasses when you're going in and out of the shadows on your favourite trail.

    The helmet I retired also had a visor, I had to discard it after being dismounted by a low branch
    with enough force to split the helmet. The visor blocked my overhead peripheral vision and was the
    cause of the mishap. I can't see any reason for visors on off-road helmets, they seem to just copy
    similar visors on motocross helmets. Typically, mountain bikers don't sit any more upright than road
    bikers, at least I don't anyway.
     
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