My first crash.

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Simon Mason, Feb 23, 2004.

  1. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    Well, I suppose one crash in 6 years isn't bad. I had left my car at a garage for
    service/repairs/MOT etc. and taken my bike off the rear rack and rode to work. On the way back to
    pick it up, I rode around a roundabout, the same roundabout I use every day, except that I took a
    different line as ironically my car was waiting to be picked up at the second exit of this
    roundabout and I usually take the first. The next thing I knew, my front wheel lost grip and I ended
    up gashing my ankle, banging my knee and ended with a large blow to my unhelmeted bonce.

    I staggered into the garage on foot and to add insult to injury (literally) was forced to pay 450
    quid for car repairs, which had single handedly wiped out all of the petrol savings for a whole
    year I save by cycle commuting. After putting the bike on the rear rack, I drove to the nearest
    police station to report the accident, as it was an RTA with injuries. They weren't interested,
    but I stood there until they logged it, which eventually they did. As there was a head injury
    involved they strongly advised me to go to A+E, but I went home instead. There was no way I was
    going to sit in A+E for 5 hours only for them to tell me to clear off home and rest. Soon after, a
    police officer rang me to ask me how I was and told me he had come off his motorbike at the exact
    same spot!

    The next night I went out for a 20-mile run, but my confidence was shot; I was convinced that I
    was going to fall off at every bend. Also my rear derailleur must have been damaged, as I could
    not get the 6th and 7th cog on the rear cassette. I went home and adjusted the rear mech and
    headed out again. I had to find out why I came off, so I was bizarrely stood in the middle of this
    roundabout seeing if there was any oil on the road by rubbing my foot on it. There was a slight
    slippery spot, so I guess there must have been some oil that had become lethal as the first bit of
    rain fell that evening.

    My work mates said that they had told me that cycling was dangerous, at the same time as a second
    colleague was hospitalised by a heart attack...

    Simon Mason Kingston upon Hull.
     
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  2. davebee

    davebee New Member

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    Boooo. Sorry to hear about you accident. keep on riding though. I ha da bit of an accident about 3 months ago when 3 pedestrians stepped out from in front of a bus stopped at a bus stop, and I went over the handlebars. Scary moment. I always wear a helmet now, but it hasn't stopped me riding. I know there is loads of dispute about helmets but one makes me feel safer.
     
  3. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Simon Mason wrote: ..............
    > The next night I went out for a 20-mile run, but my confidence was
    > shot; I was convinced that I was going to fall off at every bend.

    Bad luck with the crash. I know exactly what that feeling is like but confidence will gradually
    return to 97% of what it was before too long. That little bit of extra caution will do you good when
    it comes to dealing with wet and icy bends. Oil is terribly lethal though: there's not a lot you can
    do about it apart from riding at under 5mph all the time - so, really, we have to take our chances
    with it. Fortunately, oil/diesel patches slippery enough on bends in just the "right" places are
    very few and far between. I've only ever slipped over on oil once: very scary and painful. Skidding
    on it on the straight is just as scary but quite fun once you realise you're still upright and in
    one piece :)

    > Also my rear derailleur must have been damaged, as I could not get the 6th and 7th cog on the rear
    > cassette.

    Frame's gear hanger might be bent (can be straightened if integral steel type). That's more common
    than damaged mechs.

    ~PB
     
  4. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    Yikes, hope you suffer/suffered no after effects. Take it easy out there. Unfortunatley these things
    do happen.

    --
    The Reply & From email addresses are checked rarely. http://www.mseries.freeserve.co.uk
     
  5. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    I have about one crash a year of varying severity; from just falling at tram lines to wiping out on bends.

    My most recent was when I was decending in the peaks and made the decision to straighten up to brake rather than go around a corner at 45 mph. The bike stopped literaly 2 cm from a dry stone wall. My life flashed before my eyes.

    Following crashes I've been in hospital once for 2 days and on an MTB session we had to call out an air ambulance when somone hit a tree and broke three ribs and his hip into 3 sections.

    It would seem that crashes are a part of cycling, no matter how safe you are you can't depend upon others being safe!!! After a crash it takes about 10 mins to get up to speed.
     
  6. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    [email protected] (Simon Mason) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > Well, I suppose one crash in 6 years isn't bad.

    Commiserations! At least you now have some road rash to show you are a real cyclist. :)

    > The next thing I knew, my front wheel lost grip and I ended up gashing my ankle, banging my knee
    > and ended with a large blow to my unhelmeted bonce.

    And if you had been wearing a helmet you would probably have survived to tell us about it.

    > I staggered into the garage on foot and to add insult to injury (literally) was forced to pay 450
    > quid for car repairs, which had single handedly wiped out all of the petrol savings for a whole
    > year I save by cycle commuting.

    Except that the increased wear and tear would probably have made the repair bill even higher.

    > There was a slight slippery spot, so I guess there must have been some
    > oil that had become lethal as the first bit of rain fell that evening.

    You need eyes like a hawk when you're cornering. Once the front wheel goes there's nothing you can
    do, and as you've just found out you go down so fast there's no time even to think about it.

    > My work mates said that they had told me that cycling was dangerous, at the same time as a second
    > colleague was hospitalised by a heart attack...

    As your colleague discovered, not exercising is way more dangerous than cycling.

    --
    Dave...
     
  7. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    "2LAP" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...

    > I have about one crash a year of varying severity; from just falling at tram lines to wiping out
    > on bends.

    does that include MTBing falls? If so, that's pretty good, if not, that's pretty apalling. No wonder
    you think bike riding is dangerous.

    clive
     
  8. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 24/2/04 9:50 am, in article [email protected],
    "2LAP" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > MSeries wrote:
    >> Yikes, hope you suffer/suffered no after effects. Take it easy out there. Unfortunatley these
    >> things do happen.
    >> --
    >> The Reply & From email addresses are checked rarely.
    >> http://www.mseries.freeserve.co.uk/http://www.mseries.freeserve.co.uk
    >
    >
    > I have about one crash a year of varying severity; from just falling at tram lines to wiping out
    > on bends.

    Thats about one more than me. Maybe it's something to do with riding style?

    > My most recent was when I was decending in the peaks and made the decision to straighten up to
    > brake rather than go around a corner at 45 mph. The bike stopped literaly 2 cm from a dry stone
    > wall. My life flashed before my eyes.

    Ahh.. maybe there are lessons to be learned there.

    > Following crashes I've been in hospital once for 2 days and on an MTB session we had to call out
    > an air ambulance when somone hit a tree and broke three ribs and his hip into 3 sections.

    My last crash that required hospital treatment was in 1987. That was severe road rash.

    > It would seem that crashes are a part of cycling, no matter how safe you are you can't depend upon
    > others being safe!!! After a crash it takes about 10 mins to get up to speed.

    They may be part of your cycling but I sure as anything try to make sure they are not part of mine.
    Sure I have fallen off a few times but crashes that require medical attention have been virtually
    non-existent. Maybe it is down to riding style.

    ..d
     
  9. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    2LAP wrote:
    > MSeries wrote:
    > > Yikes, hope you suffer/suffered no after effects. Take it easy out there. Unfortunatley these
    > > things do happen.
    > > --
    > > The Reply & From email addresses are checked rarely.
    > >
    > http://www.mseries.freeserve.co.uk/http://www.mseries.freeserve.co.uk
    >
    >
    > I have about one crash a year of varying severity; from just falling at tram lines to wiping out
    > on bends.

    Thats a higher average than I have.

    --
    The Reply & From email addresses are checked rarely. http://www.mseries.freeserve.co.uk
     
  10. >Commiserations! At least you now have some road rash to show you are a
    >real cyclist. :)

    And commisserations from me. What Simon now needs is one of these..

    http://www.primalwear.com/2004site/2004-T-SHIRTS/OTBSC.html

    ...an official Over The Bar Scar Club t-shirt :)

    Cheers, helen s

    --This is an invalid email address to avoid spam-- to get correct one remove dependency on fame &
    fortune h*$el*$$e**nd***$o$ts***i*$*$m**m$$o*n**[email protected]$*$a$$o**l.c**$*$om$$
     
  11. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    [email protected] (dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > And commisserations from me. What Simon now needs is one of these..
    >
    > http://www.primalwear.com/2004site/2004-T-SHIRTS/OTBSC.html
    >
    > ...an official Over The Bar Scar Club t-shirt :)

    Ooh, I like! Now all I've got to do is drop some hints for getting one as a birthday present. I'll
    have to be pretty unsubtle as my wife doesn't go anywhere near a PC normally, it'll be along the
    lines of "See that, that would make a very good birthday present you know." :)

    Graeme
     
  12. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    We decided in another thread that this might be related to miles covered, age and types of riding done (during MTBing there are lots of notable crashes).
     
  13. Call me Bob

    Call me Bob Guest

    On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 11:40:29 +0000, David Martin
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >They may be part of your cycling but I sure as anything try to make sure they are not part of mine.
    >Sure I have fallen off a few times but crashes that require medical attention have been virtually
    >non-existent. Maybe it is down to riding style.

    No doubt it is down to riding style. He seems happy to accept thought that falls are going to be a
    part of his cycling, I don't see anything wrong with that myself. If his style is a bit more
    "attacking", and his speeds a bit more racy then that probably contributes to the excitement and
    enjoyment he gets from his riding. More power to his elbow I say.

    There's nothing wrong with coming a cropper as long as you take appropriate measures to (more or
    less) ensure it isn't under a bus. A few bumps and scrapes, maybe the occasional few stitches, so
    what. I get the same every week when playing rugby.
    --

    "Bob"

    'The people have spoken, the bastards'

    Email address is spam trapped.
    To reply directly remove the beverage.
     
  14. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    2LAP wrote:
    > We decided in another thread that this might be related to miles covered, age and types of riding
    > done (during MTBing there are lots of notable crashes).

    Of couse, with a complicated formula relating all four variables. One can minimise the risks though
    to a certain extent. E.g. I gave up MTBing after a pair of crashes that hurt, I took it as a
    warning. I avoid certain roads when they are busy. In my younger days I probably wouldn't have done
    but whether its because the traffic is worse now or I percieve more risk is unknown.

    --
    The Reply & From email addresses are checked rarely. http://www.mseries.freeserve.co.uk
     
  15. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers wrote:
    >> Commiserations! At least you now have some road rash to show you are a real cyclist. :)
    >
    > And commisserations from me. What Simon now needs is one of these..
    >

    Only if he has the scar

    like I have

    http://web.ukonline.co.uk/mseries/MNUglyMug.jpg

    That picture was taken after I washed my face in the stream after my second last crash during my
    last MTB ride.

    --
    The Reply & From email addresses are checked rarely. http://www.mseries.freeserve.co.uk
     
  16. Mark

    Mark Guest

  17. 2LAP <[email protected]>typed

    > MSeries wrote:
    > > Yikes, hope you suffer/suffered no after effects. Take it easy out there. Unfortunatley these
    > > things do happen.
    > > --
    > > The Reply & From email addresses are checked rarely.
    > > http://www.mseries.freeserve.co.uk/http://www.mseries.freeserve.co.uk

    > I have about one crash a year of varying severity; from just falling at tram lines to wiping out
    > on bends.

    Uuuh?!?!

    I've given up cycling now but *never* had a cycling-related crash[1] resulting in hospital
    treatment. For three years, I averaged 10,000 miles pa.

    > It would seem that crashes are a part of cycling, no matter how safe you are you can't depend upon
    > others being safe!!! After a crash it takes about 10 mins to get up to speed.

    Not in my experience...

    [1] I did attend hospital 25 years ago when a black labrador, taking a 6-year-old for a walk, took
    exception to me and bit my calf. I did not crash.

    Your risk enveope must differ from mine...

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  18. Gawnsoft

    Gawnsoft Guest

    On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 00:51:49 GMT, davebee
    <[email protected]> wrote (more or less):

    >Boooo. Sorry to hear about you accident. keep on riding though. I ha da bit of an accident about 3
    >months ago when 3 pedestrians stepped out from in front of a bus stopped at a bus stop, and I went
    >over the handlebars. Scary moment. I always wear a helmet now, but it hasn't stopped me riding. I
    >know there is loads of dispute about helmets but one makes me feel safer.

    That's precisely the sort of accident that it can help with most.

    Cycle speeds, protecting against contact with hard ground, head going 'straight' into something
    harder than a skull (tarmacced road).

    Cheers, Euan Gawnsoft: http://www.gawnsoft.co.sr Symbian/Epoc wiki: http://html.dnsalias.net:1122
    Smalltalk links (harvested from comp.lang.smalltalk) http://html.dnsalias.net/gawnsoft/smalltalk
     
  19. David Martin <[email protected]>typed

    > > It would seem that crashes are a part of cycling, no matter how safe you are you can't depend
    > > upon others being safe!!! After a crash it takes about 10 mins to get up to speed.

    > They may be part of your cycling but I sure as anything try to make sure they are not part of
    > mine. Sure I have fallen off a few times but crashes that require medical attention have been
    > virtually non-existent. Maybe it is down to riding style.

    You are me &ICM£5...

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  20. 2LAP <[email protected]>typed

    > We decided in another thread that this might be related to miles covered, age and types of riding
    > done (during MTBing there are lots of notable crashes).

    Hmm... I had 25 years of adult cycling on all sorts of road, much of it in London. I didn't do
    much MTBing.

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
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