My first post!!! Need advice on new bike...

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by bowyorang, Mar 26, 2005.

  1. bowyorang

    bowyorang New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2005
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi all! First post and new to cycling!
    Here is the deal, I just typed a long thread about my whole situation and then then it got deleted because I wasn't logged in...O'well, I'll try to shorten it.
    I'm looking to by a new bike. A step up from the general xmart bike.
    The local shop has a Jamis explorer 1.0 for $225. Would this be a good bike and price?
    I'll be using it for going on rides with my wife around town on a paved trail, occasionally taking it camping, and if I really start enjoying it I might use it for excercise some on the bike trail. I would however like to have a bike that is good quality made and can take a little abuse if I feel like getting off in the dirt some.
    Also, what would be the major differances in the 1.0 vs. the step up to the 2.0.
    Thanks for any advice.
    Micah
     
    Tags:


  2. bowyorang

    bowyorang New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2005
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Surely someone has an opinion here.....If nothing else just to say this is just too low end to deal with :)
    Any other brand advice is welcome also...Also considering looking for one of the Tech bikes. I heard on another thread that they had a good following as well...I think it was the 7100 model, or something like that.
    If the Jamis IS a good bike to ride, then I would like to seriously consider it since the only local bike shop around carries them along with Specialty. The closest bike shop other than that is about 50miles, but I would do the traveling for better quality and/or price....
    Anyone.....
     
  3. Shane422

    Shane422 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0
    I own a Jamis road bike and the brand is quite good. Jamis is famous for giving you a lot for your money. As for the model you specify, I don't know much about the components that it lists on the website. They are not road bike components but they are at least low end Shimano instead of some off brand. I can say that it looks like you have to go up to the 3.0 to get 700c rims though. The 1.0 and 2.0 have 26 in rims which are most often found on mountain bikes. But they do have more rolling resistance than the 700c wheels. The Trek 7100 has 700c rims, my wife has that bike and loves it. The 700c rims will make a difference if you are going to put in paved miles vs gravel or dirt trails.

    It looks like the Jamis 2.0 is priced equal to the Trek 7100 (~$310), but I'd still look to the Jamis 3.0. The 7100 seems to have lesser components than the 2.0 (i.e. not Shimano).
     
  4. bowyorang

    bowyorang New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2005
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Shane, Thanks!
    That's really what I was looking for! A little bit of comparison by someone that know a lot more about it than me.
    So...The larger wheels (700c) would be better because it would take less rotations and may infact get you there more quickly? I'm guessing that is why. You mentioned that the 26in rims would have more rolling resistance. In laymans terms...what does that mean?
    It looks as though the 3.0 and 7100 (or 7200) will probably be within $100 of each other, which wouldn't be that big of a deal as long as the quality of components are upgraded as well as better rims/tires...
    I have heard of Shimano before, but am totally ignorant about the quality of differant componants that these bikes have, so if someone has a little time to help a guy out I'd surely appreciate it if you could check out the specs on these bikes and chime in with your oppinion...
    http://www.jamisbikes.com/bikes/05_explorer3.html#
    http://www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2004/citybike/7100.jsp
     
  5. p38lightning

    p38lightning New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    Messages:
    418
    Likes Received:
    3
    An excellent source of information for a bike buyer is the "Bicycle Review" web site http://www.bikebuying.com/bicycle_reviews/bicycle_reviews.htm
    which has reviews not only of complete bikes but of components. The reviews are written by individuals who own and use the products not professional journalists. So if you want to know the difference between say Shimano Alivio and Shimano Sora components you can do some research and make an informed choice.

    Go to ebay and find listings of the bike you're considering and others in it's price range and then compare the components and overall coments on the bikes. I hope that this helps. Good luck, and enjoy the ride!
     
  6. Jaguar27

    Jaguar27 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2003
    Messages:
    648
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi Bow...
    Welcome to the wonderfull world of Cycling, and to the list...
    I was in a similar position to you a couple of years ago, I borrowed a Friend's Bike for a July 4th Beach Bike Path ride, we then decided to do it a couple of times a month so I bought an inexpensive Bike, similar to the ones you are looking at and after a couple of months bought a Road Bike...
    http://feltracing.com/2005_bikes/2005_f90.html which is essentially an entry level bike....

    I'm very unfamiliar with both the Jamis and trek you are considering, however, they both look as though they'd serve the same purpose for the type of riding you THINK you will be doing...after you've ridden for a month or two you'll have more of an idea whether you'll be riding on Trails or roads or just around the nieghborhood etc....

    You should base your final decision on which one fits and feels the best, if they both fit and feel the same, choose the nicest color...

    Also, remember you need to budget for a Helmet and also some cycling shorts, they make regular looking mountain bike shorts with padding...these will enable you to ride further initially while you get used to sitting on a saddle...this style of bike isn't good for long distances because most of the weight will be on your Butt....having said that, if you ride often enough you'll deffinately feel a lot better, you'll get some base miles in, start to condition your heart and lungs plus you'll have a lot of fun....

    The 26" wheels will probably have wider, lower pressure knobly tires, good for light unpaved trails but offer higher rolling reistance, the 700c are road bike diameter...they normally come with narrower, smoother tires that can be inflated to higher pressures, so you'll have less rolling resistance, better for paved roads...so it depends on where you will be riding most....

    The most important thing is to start riding and have fun....this is an entry level bike and will either be left in a shed after a couple of months or lead to a more educated purchase the next time around....

    Good luck and have fun!!

     
  7. RC2

    RC2 New Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2004
    Messages:
    905
    Likes Received:
    1
    LOL, quite a few opinionated folks in this forum. You've come to the right place. You can have mine. For a 300-500 $ bike, I'd look at used. You can find a few years old MTB in that range on ebay/etc. that previously sold for closer to 1000 $ if you try hard enough and you'll notice a large difference w/r/t weight and quality. Just do your research on the buyer/product.

    There ya go, RC's opinion, and it was free! :D
     
  8. RC2

    RC2 New Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2004
    Messages:
    905
    Likes Received:
    1
  9. Shane422

    Shane422 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0
    More rolling resistence basically means that it will require more force to get moving. Less rolling resistence means easier peddling. You mentioned that your LBS also carried Specialized. They carry some nice hybrids as well, but they tend to be more pricey, but higher quality for the money.
     
  10. bowyorang

    bowyorang New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2005
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the opinions everyone!
    p38lightning- thanks for the link. I went there before though and they didn't have any reviews on the Jamis Explorer, I did find some on the Trek's though. It seem the majority of the people liked them although I noticed that most upgraded some of the components leading me to wonder if they just aren't any good or they just prefered something else...
    Jaguar27-Thanks for the welcome and advice as well. I could be wrong and and may eat my words in the future, but I will probably stick with something like the hybrid instead of moving to a road bike. I've had back problems in the past (crushed vetebrae) and I think the constant layed over position on a road bike would get to me. I took a look at those felt bikes. They look pretty awesome.
    RC2-Totally understand about buying used. Sometimes it is the best way to go. I just hate buying used, expecially when it's through ebay since you really don't know what to expect except what the owner of the bike tells you. That and I don't want to buy into something that might be a great bike but when I get it, it may not fit, or may just not be the setup that is right for me. An example would be the link you provided. It looks like a great bike, But he descibes it as a mountain bike and you can tell it has nobby tires. I had a mountain bike before and I hated ridding it because it would beat you to death on pavement and it really didn't handle that well. But for someone else offroad it would be great. I will keep the "buying used" option open though.
    Shane422- Thanks for the resistance clarification. After thinking it over I totally understang. It also would have to do with lower or higher air pressure, right? What models of the Specialized might be worth checking out? I might be presueded to go higher in range if necessary. But defiantly would
    like to keep it under $500 if possible.....unless there was just an awesome one for a little more....
    Thanks all for you help and if anyone else has anything to add, please do.
    Micah
     
  11. RC2

    RC2 New Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2004
    Messages:
    905
    Likes Received:
    1
    Yeah the used route isn't always the easiest... you have to find the size that fits on a particular few bikes and be opportunistic. Sometimes finding your size in a gently-used bike at the right price takes a while. And if it doesn't fit for some reason at the end of the day you've waisted some time and money for shipping. As I said, it's what I'd do b/c I've been on bikes for decades and know what I like and what consititutes a good value. Good luck.
     
  12. bowyorang

    bowyorang New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2005
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was just looking at the Specialized Sirrus bike. Anyone have one of those???
    They have it listed not only in the comfort section of their website, but also the road bike section. It looks like it may be made more for speed though...to my untrained eyes...
    My main concern is for comfort. the bike I choose has to be comfortable enough to tool along with my wife and son on bike paths, but I would also like something that is manuverable and can have a little pep to it at time.
    What do ya'll think.
    My only main concern is in the picture it shows the seat being higher up than the handle bars...I know this is good for the road, but can it be adjusted down and the handle bars up, so that it can give a more sitting up position for the slower days?
    Micah
     
  13. Shane422

    Shane422 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0
    Don't worry about that. They do that in all pictures to make them look fast. You could put an adjustable stem on that and make it fit your riding style whether it be speedy or leisurely. The Sirrus was the Specialized I was going to suggest, since you said your LBS carried Specialized. Buying locally will be much better than not. They'll take care of fitting you and caring for any problems you might have down the road. But I'd still look hard at the Jamis, there is a lot there for the money. Now that you're talking $500, look at the Jamis Coda Sport. It has the adjustable stem, 700c wheels, and Shimano components for about $500. The other difference is that it is a Cro-moly frame (Steel) vs Aluminum. I prefer steel becuase it absorbs vibration better than Aluminum. The bike weighs a tad more, but we are talking about a 1 - 1.5 lb difference.

    Just try to ride everything in your price range that is available to you. You'll know the bike when you ride it.
     
  14. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2004
    Messages:
    1,792
    Likes Received:
    1
    Sorry but quality bike and $225 don't belong together in the same sentence. Not even one from S-Mart :D

    If you plan on doing much trail riding on it at all you'll tear it up in no time. If you just stick to the paved trails and do a little riding with the wifey it'll probably be OK.
     
  15. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2004
    Messages:
    1,792
    Likes Received:
    1
    No it isn't. It's terrible. They're ball busters. :eek: You have to be about 20 years old to ride in that position.
     
  16. bowyorang

    bowyorang New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2005
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Do you mean that riding like that would be "ball busters", or that type of bike would be considered a ball buster? Please clairfy.
    Micah
     
  17. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2004
    Messages:
    1,792
    Likes Received:
    1
    Mucho pain. Hard on the reproductive system, back and hands/wrists. i.e. must be 20 years old or at an age that is very tolerant of pain.
     
  18. rockitj

    rockitj New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2004
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have an '04 Sirrus Elite and I am quite pleased with it. I had a Trek 7100 for a couple of months and traded it in on the Elite. I find the Sirrus much quicker. It has road gearing vs. MTB gears of the Trek. I use it for commuting, club rides and training. It has an adjustable stem which allows you to easily raise the bars. Not sure if the '05 has the same stem or not, but it's worth looking into. I'd hesitate to take it off road though. Groomed trails may be ok, but with 700x28 slicks that's about the limit. Hope this helps...
     
  19. allezkmiec

    allezkmiec New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2004
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    For what it's worth, the fastest guy on our local group rides is 45 years old and has had his saddle 2 or 3 inches higher than his bars since he was 20. Oh, and his reproductive system? ask his wife and 4 kids :)

    But that aside, I've found that for long, easy rides, having my saddle and handlebars close to the same height is the comfiest combo.

    -Matt
     
Loading...
Loading...