My First Tri in May

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Cam Wilson, Mar 23, 2003.

  1. Cam Wilson

    Cam Wilson Guest

    I am *SO* pumped for this race!!!

    I just registered for my first tri, a Try-a-Tri race at a May event with another longer tri, a
    relay, and a duathlon. Since this is to be my first, I felt that the short race for beginners would
    be appropriate. As it stands right now, I *could* handle a longer race, though I haven't gone
    through transitions and all of the finer details of a tri yet.... so a short, easier-going race is
    the way to get familiarized with things.

    I should be able complete the race in under an hour. I know my swim time roughly, as well as my run
    time, but am unsure about the bike. I HAVE been cycling, but have not yet checked my time for the
    distance that'll be covered in the race. It is a 100m-12.1km-2K race.

    I figure I can move fairly quickly and confidently through the swim, with a surge over the last 50m
    and all out on the last 25m... then just pedal the darned bike for 12.1k (no strategy to the bike
    yet - any tips?), then take a couple of minutes on the run to get the legs in run mode and then go
    full out for the ridiculously short 2K. Hell, I've done a number of half marathons, and one
    marathon, so 2K will be nothing.

    But the overall experience should sufficiently blow my mind, and hook me into this sport. I've been
    a fan, watching races on both TV and live, watching and learning transition strategies, etc. I have
    mentally gone through the whole race several times already, and have done a couple of bricks just to
    test how the bod handles the switch from sport to sport. Now that the roads are bare around here
    (snow's melting), I'll tune up the bike and get out there for better quality rides. It's just been
    the stationary bike all this winter.

    All right, tri... here I come!

    Cam
     
    Tags:


  2. Cam Wilson <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I am *SO* pumped for this race!!!
    >
    > I just registered for my first tri, a Try-a-Tri race at a May event with another longer tri, a
    > relay, and a duathlon. Since this is to be my first, I felt that the short race for beginners
    > would be appropriate. As it stands right now, I *could* handle a longer race, though I haven't
    > gone through transitions and all of the finer details of a tri yet.... so a short, easier-going
    > race is the way to get familiarized with things.
    >
    > I should be able complete the race in under an hour. I know my swim time roughly, as well as my
    > run time, but am unsure about the bike. I HAVE been cycling, but have not yet checked my time for
    > the distance that'll be covered in the race. It is a 100m-12.1km-2K race.
    >
    > I figure I can move fairly quickly and confidently through the swim, with a surge over the last
    > 50m and all out on the last 25m... then just pedal the darned bike for 12.1k (no strategy to the
    > bike yet - any tips?), then take a couple of minutes on the run to get the legs in run mode and
    > then go full out for the ridiculously short 2K. Hell, I've done a number of half marathons, and
    > one marathon, so 2K will be nothing.
    >
    > But the overall experience should sufficiently blow my mind, and hook me into this sport. I've
    > been a fan, watching races on both TV and live, watching and learning transition strategies, etc.
    > I have mentally gone through the whole race several times already, and have done a couple of
    > bricks just to test how the bod handles the switch from sport to sport. Now that the roads are
    > bare around here (snow's melting), I'll tune up the bike and get out there for better quality
    > rides. It's just been the stationary bike all this winter.
    >
    > All right, tri... here I come!
    >
    > Cam
    >

    Have you practiced T1, the swim to bike transition? That's another spot that trips up many 1st
    timers. Just run through it a couple of times so you've got the steps down and know what works for
    you. Have a great Tri!
     
  3. You'll have a great time, Cam. It's a wonderful sport and a good race.

    Harry

    Cam Wilson <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am *SO* pumped for this race!!!
    >
    > I just registered for my first tri, a Try-a-Tri race at a May event with another longer tri, a
    > relay, and a duathlon. Since this is to be my first, I felt that the short race for beginners
    > would be appropriate. As it stands right now, I *could* handle a longer race, though I haven't
    > gone through transitions and all of the finer details of a tri yet.... so a short, easier-going
    > race is the way to get familiarized with things.
    >
    > I should be able complete the race in under an hour. I know my swim time roughly, as well as my
    > run time, but am unsure about the bike. I HAVE been cycling, but have not yet checked my time for
    > the distance that'll be covered in the race. It is a 100m-12.1km-2K race.
    >
    > I figure I can move fairly quickly and confidently through the swim, with a surge over the last
    > 50m and all out on the last 25m... then just pedal the darned bike for 12.1k (no strategy to the
    > bike yet - any tips?), then take a couple of minutes on the run to get the legs in run mode and
    > then go full out for the ridiculously short 2K. Hell, I've done a number of half marathons, and
    > one marathon, so 2K will be nothing.
    >
    > But the overall experience should sufficiently blow my mind, and hook me into this sport. I've
    > been a fan, watching races on both TV and live, watching and learning transition strategies, etc.
    > I have mentally gone through the whole race several times already, and have done a couple of
    > bricks just to test how the bod handles the switch from sport to sport. Now that the roads are
    > bare around here (snow's melting), I'll tune up the bike and get out there for better quality
    > rides. It's just been the stationary bike all this winter.
    >
    > All right, tri... here I come!
    >
    > Cam
     
  4. Rivermist

    Rivermist Guest

    In a race as short as that one, you can move ahead of a lot of people by just making sure you have
    fast transitions. Practice them.

    Have fun and let us know how it turned out.

    "Cam Wilson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am *SO* pumped for this race!!!
    >
    > I just registered for my first tri, a Try-a-Tri race at a May event with another longer tri, a
    > relay, and a duathlon. Since this is to be my first, I felt that the short race for beginners
    > would be appropriate. As it stands right now, I *could* handle a longer race, though I haven't
    > gone through transitions and all of the finer details of a tri yet.... so a short, easier-going
    > race is the way to get familiarized with things.
    >
    > I should be able complete the race in under an hour. I know my swim time roughly, as well as my
    > run time, but am unsure about the bike. I HAVE been cycling, but have not yet checked my time for
    > the distance that'll be covered in the race. It is a 100m-12.1km-2K race.
    >
    > I figure I can move fairly quickly and confidently through the swim, with a surge over the last
    > 50m and all out on the last 25m... then just pedal the darned bike for 12.1k (no strategy to the
    > bike yet - any tips?), then take a couple of minutes on the run to get the legs in run mode and
    > then go full out for the ridiculously short 2K. Hell, I've done a number of half marathons, and
    > one marathon, so 2K will be nothing.
    >
    > But the overall experience should sufficiently blow my mind, and hook me into this sport. I've
    > been a fan, watching races on both TV and live, watching and learning transition strategies, etc.
    > I have mentally gone through the whole race several times already, and have done a couple of
    > bricks just to test how the bod handles the switch from sport to sport. Now that the roads are
    > bare around here (snow's melting), I'll tune up the bike and get out there for better quality
    > rides. It's just been the stationary bike all this winter.
    >
    > All right, tri... here I come!
    >
    > Cam
     
  5. Broooz

    Broooz Guest

    "Tom Henderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Have you practiced T1, the swim to bike transition? That's another spot that trips up many 1st
    > timers. Just run through it a couple of times so you've got the steps down and know what works for
    > you. Have a great Tri!
    >
    What is the trick in this transition. Do people bother to dry off or do you just accept cycling in
    wet trunks and all the chaffing that must cause?

    Why don't they do triathlon the other way round - personally I would prefer run, cycle, swim! This
    is the way I've been training for my first one in June.
     
  6. Cam Wilson

    Cam Wilson Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Rivermist" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In a race as short as that one, you can move ahead of a lot of people by just making sure you have
    > fast transitions. Practice them.
    >
    > Have fun and let us know how it turned out.

    thanks for that tip. i've gathered that much from watching races. some people do a complete clothing
    change and really slow down during transition. i plan on wearing the same shorts/tights throughout
    and will just throw on a singlet for the bike and run. oh, and the shoes.

    i've already gotten used to using the elastic quick-lock shoe laces, which i now swear by just for
    sheer comfort.

    Cam
     
  7. Jill

    Jill Guest

    Cam Wilson <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<cam_wilson-

    > I figure I can move fairly quickly and confidently through the swim, with a surge over the last
    > 50m and all out on the last 25m...

    One thing I learned at my first tri:

    Spiking the heart rate at the end of the swim=bad.
     
  8. Cam Wilson

    Cam Wilson Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Dr. Harry Johnson) wrote:

    > You'll have a great time, Cam. It's a wonderful sport and a good race.
    >
    > Harry

    thanks, Harry. I'm really looking forward to this. after a few years of running some fairly long
    distances, i'm realizing my body won't handle much more of that pounding on the pavement, so i am
    seeing that tri is a better fit for me. a bit of running, but the swimming is excellent conditioning
    and cycling is added fun.

    Cam
     
  9. Cam Wilson

    Cam Wilson Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Tom Henderson
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Have you practiced T1, the swim to bike transition? That's another spot that trips up many 1st
    > timers. Just run through it a couple of times so you've got the steps down and know what works for
    > you. Have a great Tri!
    >

    no, i've only ever practised T2 a couple of times, but i see what you mean. the way i see it:

    jog, don't run and trip... to the bike shirt, helmet, sunglasses ON race bib belt ON sit down and
    quickly dry feet sox and shoes on grab the bike jog to the line and mount the bike get out of there!

    Cam
     
  10. [email protected] (Jill) wrote in news:2b0b9381.0303241853.7acbfd11 @posting.google.com:

    > Cam Wilson <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<cam_wilson-
    >
    >> I figure I can move fairly quickly and confidently through the swim, with a surge over the last
    >> 50m and all out on the last 25m...
    >
    > One thing I learned at my first tri:
    >
    > Spiking the heart rate at the end of the swim=bad.
    >

    I discovered that the fine motor skills department had taken the day off after a hard swim. Couldn't
    tie my shoes, and putting on a shirt seemed incredibly complicated!
     
  11. Tom G

    Tom G Guest

    The order is for safety. Do you want to konk out on your bike and fall over, konk out in the water
    and sink, or konk out while running and walk?

    Tom

    "Broooz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Tom Henderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Have you practiced T1, the swim to bike transition? That's another spot that trips up many 1st
    > > timers. Just run through it a couple of times so you've got the steps down and know what works
    > > for you. Have a great Tri!
    > >
    > What is the trick in this transition. Do people bother to dry off or do
    you
    > just accept cycling in wet trunks and all the chaffing that must cause?
    >
    > Why don't they do triathlon the other way round - personally I would
    prefer
    > run, cycle, swim! This is the way I've been training for my first one in June.
     
  12. Jojo

    Jojo Guest

    "Cam Wilson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, "Rivermist" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > In a race as short as that one, you can move ahead of a lot of people by just making sure you
    > > have fast transitions. Practice them.
    > >
    > > Have fun and let us know how it turned out.
    >
    >
    >
    > thanks for that tip. i've gathered that much from watching races. some people do a complete
    > clothing change and really slow down during transition. i plan on wearing the same shorts/tights
    > throughout and will just throw on a singlet for the bike and run. oh, and the shoes.
    >
    > i've already gotten used to using the elastic quick-lock shoe laces, which i now swear by just for
    > sheer comfort.
    >
    > Cam

    I found the quick-laces to be a real blessing! I put body glide on my heels and ankles before the
    swim, it makes getting socks on wet feet very easy. Also put baby powder inside your socks,(feet dry
    faster, no blisters) roll the socks so they are ready to pull on and set them inside your shoes.
    stack everything in the order you want to put it on. Tri-shorts dry FAST, no chafing on the bike.

    Practice T1. Before a ride, soak your body down with a hose and practice T1. It helps.

    At the race, after you mount your bike on the rack, go to the entrance of T1 from the swim and find
    your bike. Then go to the entrance of T2 and find the rack where your bike will go. My first tri was
    Danskin and with 2300 bikes in the transition area you had to know where your bike was, especially
    since many first timers were a bit disoriented coming out of the water.

    Keep a bottle of water in transition and on your bike. tape power-gels to your bike.

    Good Luck and have a blast!!!!!

    jojo
     
  13. Cam Wilson

    Cam Wilson Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "jojo"
    <cgv_2000*SPAM*@yahoo.com> wrote:

    > I found the quick-laces to be a real blessing! I put body glide on my heels and ankles before the
    > swim, it makes getting socks on wet feet very easy. Also put baby powder inside your socks,(feet
    > dry faster, no blisters) roll the socks so they are ready to pull on and set them inside your
    > shoes. stack everything in the order you want to put it on. Tri-shorts dry FAST, no chafing on
    > the bike.
    >
    > Practice T1. Before a ride, soak your body down with a hose and practice T1. It helps.
    >
    > At the race, after you mount your bike on the rack, go to the entrance of T1 from the swim and
    > find your bike. Then go to the entrance of T2 and find the rack where your bike will go. My first
    > tri was Danskin and with 2300 bikes in the transition area you had to know where your bike was,
    > especially since many first timers were a bit disoriented coming out of the water.
    >
    > Keep a bottle of water in transition and on your bike. tape power-gels to your bike.
    >
    > Good Luck and have a blast!!!!!

    hey thanks for the cool ideas. these should really help me motor through T! and T2. i could even
    practise T1 at home in my apartment! step into the shower for a soaking, then hop out and do the
    clothes change :)

    i am thinking of trying a trick to finding my bike at T1.... inflate a helium balloon and tie it so
    it floats above my bike on the racks. then i just look for the balloon after the swim... and hope
    nobody popped it.

    Cam
     
  14. Cam Wilson

    Cam Wilson Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Jill) wrote:

    > Cam Wilson <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<cam_wilson-
    >
    > > I figure I can move fairly quickly and confidently through the swim, with a surge over the last
    > > 50m and all out on the last 25m...
    >
    > One thing I learned at my first tri:
    >
    > Spiking the heart rate at the end of the swim=bad.

    oh yeah? hmmm, well maybe i'll heed your words rather than put them to the test. what did you
    experience with the HR spike?

    Cam
     
  15. Cam Wilson <[email protected]> wrote:
    > [email protected] (Jill) wrote:
    >> One thing I learned at my first tri:
    >oh yeah? hmmm, well maybe i'll heed your words rather than put them to the test. what did you
    >experience with the HR spike?

    probably that he saved 10 seconds, but nearly threw up dashing out. If anything, you want to be
    slowing down as you exit the water.
    --
    Jason O'Rourke www.jor.com
     
  16. Jkmsg

    Jkmsg Guest

    Cam Wilson <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am *SO* pumped for this race!!!
    >
    > I just registered for my first tri, a Try-a-Tri race at a May event with another longer tri, a
    > relay, and a duathlon. Since this is to be my first, I felt that the short race for beginners
    > would be appropriate. As it stands right now, I *could* handle a longer race, though I haven't
    > gone through transitions and all of the finer details of a tri yet.... so a short, easier-going
    > race is the way to get familiarized with things.
    >
    > I should be able complete the race in under an hour. I know my swim time roughly, as well as my
    > run time, but am unsure about the bike. I HAVE been cycling, but have not yet checked my time for
    > the distance that'll be covered in the race. It is a 100m-12.1km-2K race.
    >
    > I figure I can move fairly quickly and confidently through the swim, with a surge over the last
    > 50m and all out on the last 25m... then just pedal the darned bike for 12.1k (no strategy to the
    > bike yet - any tips?), then take a couple of minutes on the run to get the legs in run mode and
    > then go full out for the ridiculously short 2K. Hell, I've done a number of half marathons, and
    > one marathon, so 2K will be nothing.
    >
    > But the overall experience should sufficiently blow my mind, and hook me into this sport. I've
    > been a fan, watching races on both TV and live, watching and learning transition strategies, etc.
    > I have mentally gone through the whole race several times already, and have done a couple of
    > bricks just to test how the bod handles the switch from sport to sport. Now that the roads are
    > bare around here (snow's melting), I'll tune up the bike and get out there for better quality
    > rides. It's just been the stationary bike all this winter.
    >
    > All right, tri... here I come!
    >
    > Cam

    When it come to transitions, there are a lot of tips and tricks... unfortunately, it seems that
    experience is the best teacher. What ever you do... take it easy, don't rush... only after many T1's
    and T2 do you find a method and rythm that works.

    For reference, Pro's T1 times are usually less than 20-30 secs. (without wetsuit). With wetsuit, you
    might add 10 secs. (unless it's a Piel wetsuit). Good amateurs will finish under 1 min. Beginners
    can take up to 2-3 mins.

    I think it's important that you don't try and hurry...have fun...and, just maintain a steady pace
    (i.e., HR and effort). Triathlon is a single event sport that happens to have 3 different
    activities. Your best training involves treating all three events as one. Training for one and
    hoping you will just wing it throught the other 2 will make it more difficult than it should be. At
    any rate, good luck and have fun.

    FWIW Joe M
     
  17. Cam Wilson <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > In article <[email protected]>, "jojo"
    > <cgv_2000*SPAM*@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >> I found the quick-laces to be a real blessing! I put body glide on my heels and ankles before the
    >> swim, it makes getting socks on wet feet very easy. Also put baby powder inside your socks,(feet
    >> dry faster, no blisters) roll the socks so they are ready to pull on and set them inside your
    >> shoes. stack everything in the order you want to put it on. Tri-shorts dry FAST, no chafing on
    >> the bike.
    >>
    >> Practice T1. Before a ride, soak your body down with a hose and practice T1. It helps.
    >>
    >> At the race, after you mount your bike on the rack, go to the entrance of T1 from the swim and
    >> find your bike. Then go to the entrance of T2 and find the rack where your bike will go. My first
    >> tri was Danskin and with 2300 bikes in the transition area you had to know where your bike was,
    >> especially since many first timers were a bit disoriented coming out of the water.
    >>
    >> Keep a bottle of water in transition and on your bike. tape power-gels to your bike.
    >>
    >> Good Luck and have a blast!!!!!
    >
    > hey thanks for the cool ideas. these should really help me motor through T! and T2. i could even
    > practise T1 at home in my apartment! step into the shower for a soaking, then hop out and do the
    > clothes change :)
    >
    > i am thinking of trying a trick to finding my bike at T1.... inflate a helium balloon and tie it
    > so it floats above my bike on the racks. then i just look for the balloon after the swim... and
    > hope nobody popped it.
    >
    > Cam
    >

    People also use sidewalk chalk in the TA. Remember to figure out where you'll enter the TA after the
    swim and orient yourself from there.
     
  18. Jill

    Jill Guest

    Cam Wilson <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Spiking the heart rate at the end of the swim=bad.
    >
    > oh yeah? hmmm, well maybe i'll heed your words rather than put them to the test. what did you
    > experience with the HR spike?

    Nothing with visually explosive results or anything, I've just discovered that it's just not much
    fun to be getting on the bike already wheezing for breath. It's so much nicer to start the bike when
    you're feeling calmer and more in control. I feel like I can jump into a nice steady pace tat way,
    instead of having to treat the first bit of bike as recovery from the swim.

    Jill
     
  19. Cam Wilson

    Cam Wilson Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Jill) wrote:

    > Cam Wilson <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > Spiking the heart rate at the end of the swim=bad.
    > >
    > > oh yeah? hmmm, well maybe i'll heed your words rather than put them to the test. what did you
    > > experience with the HR spike?
    >
    > Nothing with visually explosive results or anything, I've just discovered that it's just not much
    > fun to be getting on the bike already wheezing for breath. It's so much nicer to start the bike
    > when you're feeling calmer and more in control. I feel like I can jump into a nice steady pace tat
    > way, instead of having to treat the first bit of bike as recovery from the swim.
    >
    > Jill

    and i guess the other side of this is that i'm not the strongest swimmer out there.... a 2:39 best
    in the 100m. no point in knocking myself out there - as you say, better to save the bod for the
    bike, where i can make more of a difference.

    thanks,

    Cam
     
  20. Cam Wilson

    Cam Wilson Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Jason O'Rourke) wrote:

    > Cam Wilson <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > [email protected] (Jill) wrote:
    > >> One thing I learned at my first tri:
    > >oh yeah? hmmm, well maybe i'll heed your words rather than put them to the test. what did you
    > >experience with the HR spike?
    >
    > probably that he saved 10 seconds, but nearly threw up dashing out. If anything, you want to be
    > slowing down as you exit the water.

    point taken. got it, thanks.

    Cam
     
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