My flat bar

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by craigdurkee, Feb 14, 2007.

  1. craigdurkee

    craigdurkee New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2006
    Messages:
    74
    Likes Received:
    2
    Guys i have a flat bar road bie made by giant

    http://craigspics.info/displayimage.php?album=9&pos=3

    pics above, what imrpovements could be made to make the bike more robust for my commute

    heres the specs

    frame ALUXX alloy: double butted, FluidFormed
    fork Composite blade, 1 1/8th alloy ahead steerer
    rear derailleur Shimano Tiagra 9 speed
    front derailleur Shimano R440
    shifters Shimano SL-R440 flat bar 18 speed
    crankset FSA Gossamer 9 speed MegaExo crank/BB 34x50T
    bottom bracket FSA MegaExo
    shift/chain guide
    chain Shimano HG53 9 speed
    cassette Shimano HG50 9 speed 12-25T
    brakes Tektro RX-1 85mm mini v-brakes
    brake levers Tektro Tenera V-brake
    hubs Shimano R500 20/24H wheelset
    rims Shimano R500 20/24H wheelset
    spokes Shimano R500 20/24H wheelset
    pedals Shimano M505 SPD clipless
    h.bar/stem Alloy flat bar/Alloy adj. ahead stem
    seat post Alloy suspension micro-adjust
    saddle Anatomic CRX comfort gel w/cut-out
    grips Velo anatomic comfort


    2007 Odometer: 2,017.7 km
    Lifetime Odometer: 8,813.1 km
    700 x 23C Continental ultra gatorskin, front, 196 km
    700 x 25C Continental Ultra gatorskin, rear, 7,783 km
     
    Tags:


  2. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Messages:
    3,522
    Likes Received:
    3
    You seem to have done it all. :cool:
     
  3. John M

    John M New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,404
    Likes Received:
    0
    In my mind, fenders (or mud guards in some parts of the world) are essential for commuting.
     
  4. Walrus

    Walrus New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2004
    Messages:
    850
    Likes Received:
    1
    Looks like the ideal fast commuter to me, very similar to what I'm planning on building in a few months time. I agree with John that a slimline mud guard would be a good addition, but it depends on the weather in your area. I leave mine on through summer, and even though it might only rain a handful of times, it's nice not to have muddy water up my back when it does.

    When you say you want the bike more "robust", is there something specific that bothers you about it? It's obviously a lightweight commuter, so if you wanted a more stable feel...maybe wider tires could be an option. Your rims should be able to take up to 28mm tires.

     
  5. interested

    interested New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2006
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0
    Some suggestions:

    Chain:
    Put a SRAM powerlink on the chain, or get at SRAM chain when it is time to change the chain. Won't make the bike more robust in it self, but the ability take the chain of for cleaning is a _very_ nice feature.

    Wheels:
    The wheels are probably the potentially weakest part on your bike, however, if they have lasted you 9000 km, just keep them the until they need replacement.
    For commuting, nothing really beats handbuildt 36 spoke wheels. Shimano Ultegra hubs, Sapim /DT Swiss swaged spokes, and Mavic CXP 33 rims is my idea of the perfect set of commuting wheels.
    Such wheels are very robust (strong and durable), easily maintained, and if a stick breaks a spoke, you may still be able to ride home.

    Brake pads:
    Get some quality brake pads, like BBB's trippel compound "Veestops" or Kool Stop's dual compound or salmon coloured brake pads.
    Bad brake pads can simply eat your rim in no time if you ride in winter conditions (slush and salt on the road).

    Pedals:
    If the pedals needs replacement some day, consider a pair of Time Atac mtb pedals; they are among the toughest and most durable clipless pedals.

    Stem:
    I see that the stem is adjustable and therefore probably quite "soft". A cheap 4 bolt Ritchey stem may improve the ride somewhat.

    Seatpost:
    Any suspension seatpost are less robust than a normal aluminium seatpost. However, if you like it, just keep it. If not, then Ritchey, among others, makes good seatposts at a good price.

    Fenders:
    Not only do they protect you from the rain, they also protect the bike components (bottom bracket, drivetrain, chain etc) from road grime and salt, and therefore makes them last longer.

    --
    Regards
     
  6. Dexter1225

    Dexter1225 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2006
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0
    get drop bars :p
     
Loading...