My helmet was stolen earlier this week

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by James Shugg, Jun 12, 2003.

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  1. James Shugg

    James Shugg Guest

    I have been commuting from Covent Garden to the City for three years now, never had an accident, but
    of course I always wear a helmet.

    Even though its only a 12-15 minute ride, in the summer when I arrive at the office I burst into a
    head sweat.

    But this Monday, I had to ride in hatless. No sweat on arrival. Same after the ride home. Missed the
    bike shop by 5 minutes, so I had to ride in on Tuesday without a hat too. Again, no sweat on
    arrival, even though the lights were in my favour and I made the journey from Drury Lane as far as
    Bank before I had to stop.

    Honestly, I have never ridden my bike without a helmet until this week, but I must say it is so much
    nicer to have the wind in my hair.

    Anyway, I am going to get another hat asap, but am wondering if anyone knows of a better ventilated
    (but still sturdy) one than the Met I was using?

    Cheers, James
     
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  2. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    [email protected] (James Shugg) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > I have been commuting from Covent Garden to the City for three years now, never had an accident,
    > but of course I always wear a helmet.

    Of course? You're likely to get an earful saying things like that around here.

    > Anyway, I am going to get another hat asap, but am wondering if anyone knows of a better
    > ventilated (but still sturdy) one than the Met I was using?

    Rudy Project make one without a hard shell that's quite popular among roadies who want some
    protection but dislike standard helmets. I've seen continental professionals wearing them too. It
    looks a bit like an oversized cap turned backwards. I'm not sure how much good it would do you in a
    conflict with a motor vehicle, but then I'd say the same thing about a standard helmet. Take a look
    at http://www.rudyproject.com.my/product_menu_cyc01_str.html .

    --
    Dave...
     
  3. Ian

    Ian Guest

    I have a Briko, fantastic cooling system.

    >
    > [email protected] (James Shugg) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >> I have been commuting from Covent Garden to the City for three years now, never had an accident,
    >> but of course I always wear a helmet.
    >
    > Of course? You're likely to get an earful saying things like that around here.
    >
    >> Anyway, I am going to get another hat asap, but am wondering if anyone knows of a better
    >> ventilated (but still sturdy) one than the Met I was using?
    >
    > Rudy Project make one without a hard shell that's quite popular among roadies who want some
    > protection but dislike standard helmets. I've seen continental professionals wearing them too. It
    > looks a bit like an oversized cap turned backwards. I'm not sure how much good it would do you in
    > a conflict with a motor vehicle, but then I'd say the same thing about a standard helmet. Take a
    > look at http://www.rudyproject.com.my/product_menu_cyc01_str.html .
    >
    > --
    > Dave...
     
  4. Panda

    Panda Guest

    had a met 5th element for couple of months now and it is the coolest ive ever had, so cool in fact
    that i can feel rain drops hiting my head!i assume it passes all the usual test and looks sturdy -
    just airy!

    panda

    James Shugg wrote:
    > I have been commuting from Covent Garden to the City for three years now, never had an accident,
    > but of course I always wear a helmet.
    >
    > Even though its only a 12-15 minute ride, in the summer when I arrive at the office I burst into a
    > head sweat.
    >
    > But this Monday, I had to ride in hatless. No sweat on arrival. Same after the ride home. Missed
    > the bike shop by 5 minutes, so I had to ride in on Tuesday without a hat too. Again, no sweat on
    > arrival, even though the lights were in my favour and I made the journey from Drury Lane as far as
    > Bank before I had to stop.
    >
    > Honestly, I have never ridden my bike without a helmet until this week, but I must say it is so
    > much nicer to have the wind in my hair.
    >
    > Anyway, I am going to get another hat asap, but am wondering if anyone knows of a better
    > ventilated (but still sturdy) one than the Met I was using?
    >
    > Cheers, James
     
  5. Ningi

    Ningi Guest

    [email protected] (martin) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Has anyone found that recumbents have a benificial effect on pumelled knees caused by years of
    > upright riding ?.

    Oops - wrong newsgroup! Set follow-ups to uk.rec.cycling not uk.railway - hope this helps.

    David E. Belcher

    Dept. of Chemistry, University of York
     
  6. On Thu, 12 Jun 2003 15:07:16 +0100, Ian <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I have a Briko, fantastic cooling system.
    >
    >>
    >> [email protected] (James Shugg) wrote in message
    >> news:<[email protected]>...
    >>
    >>> I have been commuting from Covent Garden to the City for three years now, never had an accident,
    >>> but of course I always wear a helmet.
    >>
    >> Of course? You're likely to get an earful saying things like that around here.
    >>
    >>> Anyway, I am going to get another hat asap, but am wondering if anyone knows of a better
    >>> ventilated (but still sturdy) one than the Met I was using?
    >>
    >> Rudy Project make one without a hard shell that's quite popular among roadies who want some
    >> protection but dislike standard helmets. I've seen continental professionals wearing them too. It
    >> looks a bit like an oversized cap turned backwards. I'm not sure how much good it would do you in
    >> a conflict with a motor vehicle, but then I'd say the same thing about a standard helmet. Take a
    >> look at http://www.rudyproject.com.my/product_menu_cyc01_str.html .
    >>
    >> --
    >> Dave...

    I get round the sweaty head problem by not wearing a hat or helmet. Simple, really. Cannot see any
    benefit to them except to give aged female relatives the opportunity to say "...on that bike, you
    *do* wear a helmet, of course, don't you?"
     
  7. Ian

    Ian Guest

    20 years ago my best mate died from head injuries after falling from his bicycle while touring in
    the lakes, I've worn one ever since.

    Ian

    > From: "[Not Responding]" <[email protected]> Newsgroups: uk.rec.cycling Date: Thu,
    > 12 Jun 2003 22:40:56 +0100 Subject: Re: My helmet was stolen earlier this week
    >

    > I get round the sweaty head problem by not wearing a hat or helmet. Simple, really. Cannot see any
    > benefit to them except to give aged female relatives the opportunity to say "...on that bike, you
    > *do* wear a helmet, of course, don't you?"
     
  8. Toby Barrett

    Toby Barrett Guest

    [email protected] (James Shugg) wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > Honestly, I have never ridden my bike without a helmet until this week, but I must say it is so
    > much nicer to have the wind in my hair.

    When I returned to cycing a few years ago I bought a helmet because I thought it the correct thing
    to do. It was too hot in the summer and too cool in the winter.

    One sunny day I left it at home, and haven't used it since.

    Toby

    --
    Remove spamtrap to reply by mail
     
  9. Toby Barrett

    Toby Barrett Guest

    Ian <[email protected]> wrote in news:BB0F3951.511F%[email protected]ternet.com:

    > 20 years ago my best mate died from head injuries after falling from his bicycle while touring in
    > the lakes, I've worn one ever since.

    And my grandmother dies from head injuries after falling down the stairs. I've worn a helmet
    whenever climbing stair since....

    Toby

    --
    Remove spamtrap to reply by mail
     
  10. > Rudy Project make one without a hard shell that's quite popular among roadies who want some
    > protection but dislike standard helmets.

    Helmets without a hard shell were quite popular about 15 years ago. Actually, the present day hard
    shells are not designed to be "hard" in the sense of providing protection. They are just a thin skin
    to avoid friction when the helmet slides along the road.

    The previous non shelled helmets, usually styrofaom with a detachable nylon cover, or just the
    styrofoam alone, tended not to slide along concrete. They tended to stick to the road, jerking your
    head back, and breaking your neck. That's not really what you want from a helmet.

    It's only the very first bike helmets, the original Bell, and others of that time, that had hard
    shells. The hard shells have gone because the were essentially useless. After all, if the shell
    really is hard, hitting your head on the shell has just about the same effect as hitting your head
    on a hard road.

    It's the styrofoam which (you hope) does the job, by slowing you down gradually (if a 300g
    deceleration is slow) hopefully having slowed you down enough by the time the foam has fully crushed

    Jeremy Parker
     
  11. Marc

    Marc Guest

    Ian <[email protected]> wrote:

    > 20 years ago my best mate died from head injuries after falling from his bicycle while touring in
    > the lakes, I've worn one ever since.
    >
    > Ian
    >
    > > From: "[Not Responding]" <[email protected]> Newsgroups: uk.rec.cycling Date: Thu,
    > > 12 Jun 2003 22:40:56 +0100 Subject: Re: My helmet was stolen earlier this week
    > >
    >
    > > I get round the sweaty head problem by not wearing a hat or helmet. Simple, really. Cannot see
    > > any benefit to them except to give aged female relatives the opportunity to say "...on that
    > > bike, you *do* wear a helmet, of course, don't you?"

    And have you fallen off your bike yet?

    --
    Marc Stickers,decals,membership,cards, T shirts, signs etc for clubs and associations of all types.
    http://www.jaceeprint.demon.co.uk/
     
  12. Ian

    Ian Guest

    I assume that is supposed to be humorous, somehow I missed the joke.

    Ian

    > From: Toby Barrett <[email protected]> Newsgroups: uk.rec.cycling Date: 13 Jun 2003
    > 08:52:47 GMT Subject: Re: My helmet was stolen earlier this week
    >
    > Ian <[email protected]> wrote in news:BB0F3951.511F%[email protected]:
    >
    >> 20 years ago my best mate died from head injuries after falling from his bicycle while touring in
    >> the lakes, I've worn one ever since.
    >
    > And my grandmother dies from head injuries after falling down the stairs. I've worn a helmet
    > whenever climbing stair since....
    >
    > Toby
    >
    > --
    > Remove spamtrap to reply by mail
     
  13. Toby Barrett

    Toby Barrett Guest

    Ian <[email protected]> wrote in news:BB0F7F42.5234%[email protected]:
    >> From: Toby Barrett <[email protected]> Ian <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> news:BB0F3951.511F%[email protected]:
    >>
    >>> 20 years ago my best mate died from head injuries after falling from his bicycle while touring
    >>> in the lakes, I've worn one ever since.
    >>
    >> And my grandmother died from head injuries after falling down the stairs. I've worn a helmet
    >> whenever climbing stairs since....
    >
    > I assume that is supposed to be humorous, somehow I missed the joke.
    >
    > Ian

    No it was not meant to be humourous. My grandmother really did die from head injuries after falling
    down stairs.

    I was pointing out that this is not generally considered a good reason to don protective gear
    when climbing stairs. I wonder why another activity usually undertaken without mishap requires
    helmet wearing?

    Toby

    --
    Remove spamtrap to reply by mail
     
  14. Ian

    Ian Guest

    I don't generally climb the stairs travelling at between 20 and 30 mph, while sharing the space with
    cars, trucks and busses. I have only ever fallen off a motorcycle 3 times, the last time, my helmet
    saved my life, I was doing 45mph, I can get up to 45mph on the flat on my bicycle. When my friend
    was killed it is possible that a helmet may have saved his life, if it had I suspect his father
    would still be alive now instead of slipping into years of depression before dying a broken man, and
    his mother would not be living her old age out alone in a 3 bedroom house that she feels unable to
    give up because it is the "family" home. I choose to wear a helmet not just because of what it can
    do to help me but because I have seen the effects death has on families. I think that is good enough
    reasoning for me.

    Ian

    > From: Toby Barrett <[email protected]>
    >
    > No it was not meant to be humourous. My grandmother really did die from head injuries after
    > falling down stairs.
    >
    > I was pointing out that this is not generally considered a good reason to don protective gear when
    > climbing stairs. I wonder why another activity usually undertaken without mishap requires helmet
    > wearing?
    >
    > Toby
    >
    > --
    > Remove spamtrap to reply by mail
     
  15. Toby Barrett

    Toby Barrett Guest

    Ian <[email protected]> wrote in news:BB0F8369.523B%[email protected]:

    > I don't generally climb the stairs travelling at between 20 and 30 mph, while sharing the space
    > with cars, trucks and busses. I have only ever fallen off a motorcycle 3 times, the last time, my
    > helmet saved my life, I was doing 45mph, I can get up to 45mph on the flat on my bicycle. When my
    > friend was killed it is possible that a helmet may have saved his life, if it had I suspect his
    > father would still be alive now instead of slipping into years of depression before dying a broken
    > man, and his mother would not be living her old age out alone in a 3 bedroom house that she feels
    > unable to give up because it is the "family" home. I choose to wear a helmet not just because of
    > what it can do to help me but because I have seen the effects death has on families. I think that
    > is good enough reasoning for me.

    I apologise. I seem to have upset you. I did not mean to make light of your friend's death; as I
    said my comment was not intended to be humorous.

    I was making a point about the usefullness of cycle helmets, and the special place they seem to have
    in common perception of what is essential safety equipment. Maybe this was out of place.

    Toby

    --
    Remove spamtrap to reply by mail
     
  16. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    "Ian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BB0F8369.523B%[email protected]...

    > I don't generally climb the stairs travelling at between 20 and 30 mph, while sharing the space
    > with cars, trucks and busses.

    Bicycle helmets are designed to provide some protection in falls up to about 12mph.

    A greater proportion of motorist fatalities than cyclist fatalities are due to head injury. Do you
    wear one in the car?

    These are not reasons for not wearing a lid, just reasons for not being overconfident about their
    effect. It is absolutely not possible to say with confidence that a helmet would have prevented any
    given injury or fatality, or in a case where a helmet is worn and injury is avoided, whether there
    would have been significant injury had a helmet not been worn. No evidence anywhere has actually
    proved any significant link between helmet wearing and reductions in injuries or fatalities.

    This is partly due to a shortage of cyclists willing to go back and repeat the experiment with and
    without helmets under controlled conditions :)

    --
    Guy
    ===
    I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
    about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
    wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.

    http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/09.shtml#103 http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/09.shtml#104
     
  17. Ian

    Ian Guest

    Sorry Toby, I didn't mean to go off on one, I was just trying to show the reason I choose to wear
    one, people should make their own choice, I've made mine, I do not always wear one when I'm on the
    trike, but always on the bike.

    Ian

    > From: Toby Barrett <[email protected]> Newsgroups: uk.rec.cycling Date: 13 Jun 2003
    > 12:56:11 GMT Subject: Re: My helmet was stolen earlier this week
    >
    > Ian <[email protected]> wrote in news:BB0F8369.523B%[email protected]:
    >
    >> I don't generally climb the stairs travelling at between 20 and 30 mph, while sharing the space
    >> with cars, trucks and busses. I have only ever fallen off a motorcycle 3 times, the last time, my
    >> helmet saved my life, I was doing 45mph, I can get up to 45mph on the flat on my bicycle. When my
    >> friend was killed it is possible that a helmet may have saved his life, if it had I suspect his
    >> father would still be alive now instead of slipping into years of depression before dying a
    >> broken man, and his mother would not be living her old age out alone in a 3 bedroom house that
    >> she feels unable to give up because it is the "family" home. I choose to wear a helmet not just
    >> because of what it can do to help me but because I have seen the effects death has on families. I
    >> think that is good enough reasoning for me.
    >
    > I apologise. I seem to have upset you. I did not mean to make light of your friend's death; as I
    > said my comment was not intended to be humorous.
    >
    > I was making a point about the usefullness of cycle helmets, and the special place they seem to
    > have in common perception of what is essential safety equipment. Maybe this was out of place.
    >
    > Toby
    >
    > --
    > Remove spamtrap to reply by mail
     
  18. Ian

    Ian Guest

    I think you have come up with the perfect addition to the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act, reduced
    sentencing for those who volunteer to be cycle crash test dummies. There is no point in bringing the
    old argument about to wear or not wear a helmet out of its closet, I have made my choice for the
    reasons stated, other people have to make their own mind up, my choice is set in stone.

    Ian

    p.s. I'm not about to become some sort of pro helmet crusader.

    > From: "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]>
    >
    > This is partly due to a shortage of cyclists willing to go back and repeat the experiment with and
    > without helmets under controlled conditions :)
     
  19. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    Ian wrote:
    > I think you have come up with the perfect addition to the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act, reduced
    > sentencing for those who volunteer to be cycle crash test dummies.

    Or maybe just give them a choice between "crash test dummy" or "goolies cut off" :)

    > There is no point in bringing the old argument about to wear or not wear a helmet out of its
    > closet, I have made my choice for the reasons stated, other people have to make their own mind up,
    > my choice is set in stone.

    My choice about certain safety features was set in stone until I had my face set in plaster
    as a result.

    --
    Jim Price

    http://www.jimprice.dsl.pipex.com

    Conscientious objection is hard work in an economic war.
     
  20. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:

    >"Ian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BB0F8369.523B%[email protected]...
    >
    >> I don't generally climb the stairs travelling at between 20 and 30 mph, while sharing the space
    >> with cars, trucks and busses.
    >
    >Bicycle helmets are designed to provide some protection in falls up to about 12mph.

    Interesting.

    Last year when I cycled the Raid Pyrenean I kept my helmet in my rear pannier on the ascents and
    wore it on the descents and on the flat. My reasoning was that I wasn't likely to have a crash while
    cycling up a mountain at 3 - 4 mph, but 40 - 50 mph descents were a real danger.

    Perhaps it should have been the other way around.
    --
    remove remove to reply
     
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