My LA Marathon Race

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Scody, Mar 8, 2004.

  1. Scody

    Scody Guest

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  2. Eno

    Eno Guest

    "scody" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > It's long... didn't think you'd want me to post the entire
    > thing here...

    Maybe your report is long because it was a long day indeed
    for many runners. 100 hospitalized due to heat related
    issues, and you can probably tripple that number in terms of
    those who crawled home feeling miserable--like one of my
    friends who ended up in the emergency room later that night
    with dehydration despite drinking 2 cups of water at every
    water station and drinking Gatorade and water after the
    race. I ran/walked (mostly walked) the last 10 miles with my
    wife, lending her support, encouragement, etc... I pity
    those who ran the full 26.2. Even at mile 5 I could see the
    effects the heat were having on runners. Despite what the
    weather report may say, at Olympic boulevard (3-4 miles from
    the finish), an electronic sign displayed the temperature at
    95F. In disbelief, I checked my portable thermometer, and
    yup: 95F. Yikes.

    If there's one thing to take away: respect the distance,
    *especially* in the heat. Oh, yeah, and maybe someone should
    put together a "heat training" program.

    --
    ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º
    eNo
    "If you can't go fast, go long."
    ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º
     
  3. Arbor77

    Arbor77 Guest

    >My LA Marathon Race
    >From: "scody"

    Well, I read your long 4-page account. I think you completed
    this marathon for all the right reasons and also for all the
    wrong reasons. I note that the race results show that Steve
    Cody and Christy Cody are 31 years old and 26 years old, and
    finished with chip times of 7:59:18 and 7:59:19, and I
    presume that's you, "scody."

    Has this inspired you to do it all again with actual
    "training," or has it burned your fingers so bad
    you'll likely just hang up your medal and be proud of
    the one you did?
     
  4. Scody

    Scody Guest

    indeed, I can't wait to train and run (or even walk) a
    proper marathon. We are thinking about Orange County now...
    It's in December. This will give us enough time to start
    over, and respect the slow, 10% build.

    One of the reasons that we had decided to participate was
    because we thought that we could simply drop out and that
    participating would keep us psyched for the next one.
    Completing the race would be icing on the cake. We were
    under the impression that dropping out was a relatively
    simple thing to do. We were lucky in that we did well enough
    and retained enough fitness from our earlier training that
    we did not need it. I stress the words 'lucky enough'. The
    experience was incredible by all accounts. I can't WAIT to
    do another one.

    One of the reasons for this is that, I know the distance
    now. I understand the distance. And... I think that I have a
    great respect for the marathon. Walk/Run to me now is ok...
    where as before, it was out of the question.

    And yes, that was us. the sub-8 codys :)

    Thanks so much for reading.

    "Arbor77" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    m22.aol.com...
    > >My LA Marathon Race From: "scody"
    >
    > Well, I read your long 4-page account. I think you
    > completed this
    marathon for
    > all the right reasons and also for all the wrong reasons.
    > I note that the
    race
    > results show that Steve Cody and Christy Cody are 31 years
    > old and 26
    years
    > old, and finished with chip times of 7:59:18 and 7:59:19,
    > and I presume
    that's
    > you, "scody."
    >
    > Has this inspired you to do it all again with actual
    > "training," or has it burned your fingers so bad you'll
    > likely just hang up your medal and be
    proud
    > of the one you did?
     
  5. Scody

    Scody Guest

    I liked your post so much that I added to the account... a
    lessons learned section at the end. Thanks for keeping me
    responsible.

    "Arbor77" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    m22.aol.com...
    > >My LA Marathon Race From: "scody"
    >
    > Well, I read your long 4-page account. I think you
    > completed this
    marathon for
    > all the right reasons and also for all the wrong reasons.
    > I note that the
    race
    > results show that Steve Cody and Christy Cody are 31 years
    > old and 26
    years
    > old, and finished with chip times of 7:59:18 and 7:59:19,
    > and I presume
    that's
    > you, "scody."
    >
    > Has this inspired you to do it all again with actual
    > "training," or has it burned your fingers so bad you'll
    > likely just hang up your medal and be
    proud
    > of the one you did?
     
  6. In article <M273c.6$I%[email protected]>, eNo wrote:
    > "scody" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> It's long... didn't think you'd want me to post the
    >> entire thing here...
    >
    >
    > Maybe your report is long because it was a long day indeed
    > for many runners. 100 hospitalized due to heat related
    > issues, and you can probably tripple that number in terms
    > of those who crawled home feeling miserable--like one of
    > my friends who ended up in the emergency room later that
    > night with dehydration despite drinking 2 cups of water at
    > every water station and drinking Gatorade and water after
    > the race.

    I'd be surprised if it was dehydration (if anything he seems
    to have taken too much water). But it's true that people can
    have severe trouble with the heat. There's a point of
    diminishing returns on hydration, because sweat only cools
    you down so quickly. After that, you either slow down or
    overheat. People who are already maxed out as it is will
    simply overheat.

    I find it surprising that they time this marathon, in which
    large numbers of relatively undertrained runners
    participate, such that it is frequently a very hot event.
    The fact that it's this hot alone would make me feel
    inclined to advise beginners to choose a cooler event (and
    also avoid it like plague myself).

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  7. Eno

    Eno Guest

    "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <M273c.6$I%[email protected]>,
    > eNo wrote:
    > > "scody" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >> It's long... didn't think you'd want me to post the
    > >> entire thing
    here...
    > >
    > >
    > > Maybe your report is long because it was a long day
    > > indeed for many
    runners.
    > > 100 hospitalized due to heat related issues, and you can
    > > probably
    tripple
    > > that number in terms of those who crawled home feeling
    > > miserable--like
    one
    > > of my friends who ended up in the emergency room later
    > > that night with dehydration despite drinking 2 cups of
    > > water at every water station and drinking Gatorade and
    > > water after the race.
    >
    > I'd be surprised if it was dehydration (if anything he
    > seems to have
    taken too
    > much water).

    In my book, I normally hold your comments in high regard.
    But over-ruling a hands-on doctor's diagnosis by remote
    control doesn't bode well for your reputation around
    these parts.

    --
    eNo "Why am I here?"
     
  8. >It's long... didn't think you'd want me to post the entire
    >thing here...
    >
    >http://www.gutternickle.com:8081/blog/2004/03/08/107877240-
    >8000.html

    Wow, great story! And I won't even say a thing about
    training! ;-) Best of luck on starting your training to run
    the next one, I think you'll find it tough but not quite the
    death march you experienced this time with a good base under
    you. ANd you already know well about doing too much too
    soon. Another suggestion- pick somewhere where it will be
    cool. That helps an awful lot. But thanks for sharing an
    excellent story!!

    Teresa in AZ
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, eNo wrote:
    > "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    >> I'd be surprised if it was dehydration (if anything he
    >> seems to have taken too much water).
    >
    > In my book, I normally hold your comments in high regard.
    > But over-ruling a hands-on doctor's diagnosis by remote
    > control doesn't bode well for your reputation around
    > these parts.

    I didn't realise a doctor had made that diagnosis. If a
    doctor did indeed diagnose this *specifically as
    dehydration* (as opposed to some form of heat illness, or
    even some form of heat illness that could be caused by
    dehydration), then I stand corrected (but I am still
    surprised! he really did take a lot of water.).

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>, eNo wrote:
    > "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    >> I'd be surprised if it was dehydration (if anything he
    >> seems to have taken too much water).
    >
    > In my book, I normally hold your comments in high regard.
    > But over-ruling a hands-on doctor's diagnosis by remote
    > control doesn't bode well for your reputation around
    > these parts.

    I didn't realise a doctor had made that diagnosis. If a
    doctor did indeed diagnose this *specifically as
    dehydration* (as opposed to some form of heat illness, or
    even some form of heat illness that could be caused by
    dehydration), then I stand corrected (but I am still
    surprised! he really did take a lot of water.).

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>, eNo wrote:
    > "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    >> I'd be surprised if it was dehydration (if anything he
    >> seems to have taken too much water).
    >
    > In my book, I normally hold your comments in high regard.
    > But over-ruling a hands-on doctor's diagnosis by remote
    > control doesn't bode well for your reputation around
    > these parts.

    I didn't realise a doctor had made that diagnosis. If a
    doctor did indeed diagnose this *specifically as
    dehydration* (as opposed to some form of heat illness, or
    even some form of heat illness that could be caused by
    dehydration), then I stand corrected (but I am still
    surprised! he really did take a lot of water.).

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  12. Eno

    Eno Guest

    "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > eNo wrote:
    > > "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > >> I'd be surprised if it was dehydration (if anything he
    > >> seems to have taken too much water).
    > >
    > > In my book, I normally hold your comments in high
    > > regard. But
    over-ruling a
    > > hands-on doctor's diagnosis by remote control doesn't
    > > bode well for your reputation around these parts.
    >
    > I didn't realise a doctor had made that diagnosis. If a
    > doctor did indeed diagnose this *specifically as
    > dehydration* (as opposed to some form of
    heat
    > illness, or even some form of heat illness that could be
    > caused by dehydration), then I stand corrected (but I am
    > still surprised! he really
    did
    > take a lot of water.).

    Well, it's all a matter of deficit. Every time I saw him, he
    was drenched. He could have taken 2 cups at every
    mile/station, but if he sweat 2.5 per
    mile... He also made the mistake of wearing a silver blue
    outfit (shorts and shirt) that turned navy blue as he
    perspired--not the best color for a hot day. He went
    home, feeling like he wanted to puke the whole way,
    took a shower, and as he stepped out of the shower,
    splat, down he went. The paramedics took him to
    emergency at a local hospital, they put him on an IV,
    and he felt much better. Of course, that IV probably
    also had electrolites, so he could have been low on
    those, too.

    --
    ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º
    eNo
    "If you can't go fast, go long."
    ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º
     
  13. Eno

    Eno Guest

    "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > eNo wrote:
    > > "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > >> I'd be surprised if it was dehydration (if anything he
    > >> seems to have taken too much water).
    > >
    > > In my book, I normally hold your comments in high
    > > regard. But
    over-ruling a
    > > hands-on doctor's diagnosis by remote control doesn't
    > > bode well for your reputation around these parts.
    >
    > I didn't realise a doctor had made that diagnosis. If a
    > doctor did indeed diagnose this *specifically as
    > dehydration* (as opposed to some form of
    heat
    > illness, or even some form of heat illness that could be
    > caused by dehydration), then I stand corrected (but I am
    > still surprised! he really
    did
    > take a lot of water.).

    Well, it's all a matter of deficit. Every time I saw him, he
    was drenched. He could have taken 2 cups at every
    mile/station, but if he sweat 2.5 per
    mile... He also made the mistake of wearing a silver blue
    outfit (shorts and shirt) that turned navy blue as he
    perspired--not the best color for a hot day. He went
    home, feeling like he wanted to puke the whole way,
    took a shower, and as he stepped out of the shower,
    splat, down he went. The paramedics took him to
    emergency at a local hospital, they put him on an IV,
    and he felt much better. Of course, that IV probably
    also had electrolites, so he could have been low on
    those, too.

    --
    ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º
    eNo
    "If you can't go fast, go long."
    ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º
     
  14. Eno

    Eno Guest

    "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > eNo wrote:
    > > "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > >> I'd be surprised if it was dehydration (if anything he
    > >> seems to have taken too much water).
    > >
    > > In my book, I normally hold your comments in high
    > > regard. But
    over-ruling a
    > > hands-on doctor's diagnosis by remote control doesn't
    > > bode well for your reputation around these parts.
    >
    > I didn't realise a doctor had made that diagnosis. If a
    > doctor did indeed diagnose this *specifically as
    > dehydration* (as opposed to some form of
    heat
    > illness, or even some form of heat illness that could be
    > caused by dehydration), then I stand corrected (but I am
    > still surprised! he really
    did
    > take a lot of water.).

    Well, it's all a matter of deficit. Every time I saw him, he
    was drenched. He could have taken 2 cups at every
    mile/station, but if he sweat 2.5 per
    mile... He also made the mistake of wearing a silver blue
    outfit (shorts and shirt) that turned navy blue as he
    perspired--not the best color for a hot day. He went
    home, feeling like he wanted to puke the whole way,
    took a shower, and as he stepped out of the shower,
    splat, down he went. The paramedics took him to
    emergency at a local hospital, they put him on an IV,
    and he felt much better. Of course, that IV probably
    also had electrolites, so he could have been low on
    those, too.

    --
    ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º
    eNo
    "If you can't go fast, go long."
    ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º°`°º¤ø¤º°`°º¤ø,,,,ø¤º
     
  15. Ed Prochak

    Ed Prochak Guest

    "eNo" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > eNo wrote:
    > > > "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > > >> I'd be surprised if it was dehydration (if anything
    > > >> he seems to have taken too much water).
    > > >
    > > > In my book, I normally hold your comments in high
    > > > regard. But
    > over-ruling a
    > > > hands-on doctor's diagnosis by remote control doesn't
    > > > bode well for your reputation around these parts.
    > >
    > > I didn't realise a doctor had made that diagnosis. If a
    > > doctor did indeed diagnose this *specifically as
    > > dehydration* (as opposed to some form of
    > heat
    > > illness, or even some form of heat illness that could be
    > > caused by dehydration), then I stand corrected (but I am
    > > still surprised! he really
    > did
    > > take a lot of water.).
    >
    >
    > Well, it's all a matter of deficit. Every time I saw him,
    > he was drenched. He could have taken 2 cups at every
    > mile/station, but if he sweat 2.5 per
    > mile... He also made the mistake of wearing a silver blue
    > outfit (shorts and shirt) that turned navy blue as he
    > perspired--not the best color for a hot day. He went
    > home, feeling like he wanted to puke the whole way,
    > took a shower, and as he stepped out of the shower,
    > splat, down he went. The paramedics took him to
    > emergency at a local hospital, they put him on an IV,
    > and he felt much better. Of course, that IV probably
    > also had electrolites, so he could have been low on
    > those, too.

    Nausea is a definite symptom. (But is that also true of
    hyponatremia?)

    Did he not take any fluids AFTER the race?

    Hot weather has got to be the worst possible case for a
    first marathon.
     
  16. Carlos Jones

    Carlos Jones Guest

    On 10 Mar 2004 10:58:25 -0800, [email protected] (Ed
    prochak) wrote:

    >Nausea is a definite symptom. (But is that also true of
    >hyponatremia?)
    >
    > Did he not take any fluids AFTER the race?
    >
    >Hot weather has got to be the worst possible case for a
    >first marathon.

    Hello, Ed. How's my favourite average man in his average
    life doin'?

    Tell me, Ed, when was the last time you did something
    unusual, out-of-character, rebellious, instinctive, daring,
    or just plain silly?
     
  17. In article <[email protected]>, Ed prochak wrote:

    > Nausea is a definite symptom. (But is that also true of
    > hyponatremia?)

    It's a symptom of heat exhaustion.

    > Did he not take any fluids AFTER the race?

    He did.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  18. On 10 Mar 2004 10:58:25 -0800, [email protected] (Ed prochak) wrote:

    >"eNo" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]
    >service2.ext.ray.com>...
    >> "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]...
    >> > In article
    >> > <[email protected]>, eNo
    >> > wrote:
    >> > > "Donovan Rebbechi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    <SNIP>
    >> Well, it's all a matter of deficit. Every time I saw him,
    >> he was drenched. He could have taken 2 cups at every
    >> mile/station, but if he sweat 2.5 per
    >> mile... He also made the mistake of wearing a silver blue
    >> outfit (shorts and shirt) that turned navy blue as
    >> he perspired--not the best color for a hot day. He
    >> went home, feeling like he wanted to puke the whole
    >> way, took a shower, and as he stepped out of the
    >> shower, splat, down he went. The paramedics took him
    >> to emergency at a local hospital, they put him on an
    >> IV, and he felt much better. Of course, that IV
    >> probably also had electrolites, so he could have
    >> been low on those, too.
    >
    >Nausea is a definite symptom. (But is that also true of
    >hyponatremia?)
    >
    > Did he not take any fluids AFTER the race?
    >
    >Hot weather has got to be the worst possible case for a
    >first marathon.

    Most of the runners I saw, me included, had dried salt
    tracks down my shorts. BTW, thanks to all who suggested that
    I start using Succeed Electrolyte Caps. They probably saved
    my life last Sunday....

    M.T.
     
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