My Martha question

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Julia Altshuler, Mar 9, 2004.

  1. Questions of innocence, guilt, crime, punishment and
    celebrity aside, what do y'all think of Martha Stewart's
    recipes and cookbooks? I have one, Entertaining, I think. I
    don't use it regularly, but the few times I've cooked out
    of it, I was pleased. At this point in my life, I'm making
    more simple, old standby recipes so Stewart's recipes
    strike me as too fancy, too much emphasis on presentation,
    but I've been known every now and then go for presentation
    too. Thoughts?

    --Lia
     
    Tags:


  2. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Julia Altshuler wrote:

    > Questions of innocence, guilt, crime, punishment and
    > celebrity aside, what do y'all think of Martha Stewart's
    > recipes and cookbooks? I have one, Entertaining, I think.
    > I don't use it regularly, but the few times I've cooked
    > out of it, I was pleased. At this point in my life, I'm
    > making more simple, old standby recipes so Stewart's
    > recipes strike me as too fancy, too much emphasis on
    > presentation, but I've been known every now and then go
    > for presentation too. Thoughts?

    Check out her Hors d'Oeuvres Handbook. It's quite good. As
    for her recipes being too fancy, I've never found them
    difficult. She doesn't really write her own recipes. She's
    sort of a recipe clearinghouse, and she smart enough to
    publish ones that are not overly difficult. That's one
    reason why she's popular, I think.

    .amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0609603108/qid=1078806111/sr=2-
    1/ref=sr_2_1/102-8284641-0858534>

    --
    Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot)
    com
     
  3. Sandy N Ne

    Sandy N Ne Guest

    What I never liked about her recipes is that she always had
    like one ingredient that you could only get in one store in
    Manhatten. I always thought that everything she made was
    rather pretentious. Maybe that's way I like Rachel Ray so
    much more.

    Sandra
     
  4. The Ranger

    The Ranger Guest

    Julia Altshuler <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s54... [snip]
    > what do y'all think of Martha Stewart's recipes and
    > cookbooks?
    [snip]

    I was given three of them by family. (They know I collect
    things like this.) I looked through them and shelved'em. I
    find they're just not what I want in a cookbook. I have so
    many alternative choices that are better-written, better-
    sourced, better presented.

    The Ranger
     
  5. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    Julia Altshuler wrote:
    >
    > Questions of innocence, guilt, crime, punishment and
    > celebrity aside, what do y'all think of Martha Stewart's
    > recipes and cookbooks?

    You reminded me of something I found amusing. Sorry that I
    cannot help you about her recipes or books.

    This co-worker of mine was dating another co-worker of mine,
    he was from a wealthy family. He lived in this little rich
    town in central jersey. So, they went into the little snotty
    bookstore in town, looking to buy the latest Martha book,
    guess what. (sniff) We do not carry her books any longer
    since she started selling stuff from KMart. (laughing)
    Pretentious jerks. Probably out of business.

    nancy
     
  6. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Lia asked:

    > Questions of innocence, guilt, crime, punishment and
    > celebrity aside, what do y'all think of Martha Stewart's
    > recipes and cookbooks?

    Last Thanksgiving, I followed her gravy-making recipe, and
    thought it was extremely good.

    Bob
     
  7. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Tue, 09 Mar 2004 04:10:40 GMT, Julia Altshuler
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Questions of innocence, guilt, crime, punishment and
    >celebrity aside, what do y'all think of Martha Stewart's
    >recipes and cookbooks? I have one, Entertaining, I think. I
    >don't use it regularly, but the few times I've cooked out
    >of it, I was pleased. At this point in my life, I'm making
    >more simple, old standby recipes so Stewart's recipes
    >strike me as too fancy, too much emphasis on presentation,
    >but I've been known every now and then go for presentation
    >too. Thoughts?

    One of the recent biographical specials said a NYTimes
    reviewer (I think) infuriated M. by trying several recipes
    in her first book and discovering they didn't work.
    Presentation is all; content not so important.

    Someone gave me one of her magazines that featured a
    beautiful color picture of an hors d'oeuvre composed of a
    toasted baguette slice, goat cheese, and 3 lima beans. I'm
    wasn't interested in reading further.
     
  8. The Ranger wrote:

    I have so many alternative choices that are better-
    written,
    > better-sourced, better presented.

    Tease! So what are the cookbooks you like better? --Lia
     
  9. Sheryl Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    in article [email protected], Sandy n ne at
    [email protected] wrote on 3/8/04 11:36 PM:

    > What I never liked about her recipes is that she always
    > had like one ingredient that you could only get in one
    > store in Manhatten. I always thought that everything she
    > made was rather pretentious. Maybe that's way I like
    > Rachel Ray so much more.
    >
    > Sandra

    Well, I think she's a stickler for "quality" ingredients. I
    always have this mental picture of her describing
    ingredients in superlatives. She would never use Hershey's
    or Baker's pre-wrapped, pre-measured chocolate squares,
    available in any supermarket for $2 for a half pound box to
    make homemade brownies. She uses chunks of imported
    Callebaut or Guittard, and weighs out 4 ounces that she's
    chopped off the block. ("4 ounces of best quality
    chocolate") You might not be able to find Callebaut or
    Guittard at the Super Walmart in Coralville Iowa.

    Frankly, I made 2 batches of brownies, one with some
    Callebaut I picked up in NYC and one with Hershey's. And I
    liked the Hershey's brownies better.
     
  10. Wieland

    Wieland Guest

    > Lia asked:
    >
    > > Questions of innocence, guilt, crime, punishment and
    > > celebrity aside, what do y'all think of Martha Stewart's
    > > recipes and cookbooks?
    >

    De-lurking . . . .

    I used a recipe of hers for a dinner party. Roast pork
    tenderloin with apples and red cabbage, served with a hot
    cider vinaigrette. It wasn't difficult, and it was a big hit
    with our guests.

    Wieland
     
  11. Dog3

    Dog3 Guest

    Sheryl Rosen <[email protected]> deliciously posted in
    news:BC73415E.48317%[email protected]:

    >
    > Well, I think she's a stickler for "quality" ingredients.
    > I always have this mental picture of her describing
    > ingredients in superlatives. She would never use Hershey's
    > or Baker's pre-wrapped, pre-measured chocolate squares,
    > available in any supermarket for $2 for a half pound box
    > to make homemade brownies. She uses chunks of imported
    > Callebaut or Guittard, and weighs out 4 ounces that she's
    > chopped off the block. ("4 ounces of best quality
    > chocolate") You might not be able to find Callebaut or
    > Guittard at the Super Walmart in Coralville Iowa.
    >
    > Frankly, I made 2 batches of brownies, one with some
    > Callebaut I picked up in NYC and one with Hershey's. And I
    > liked the Hershey's brownies better.

    She makes me crazy when she presents her ingredients. That
    and her condescending attitude. That being said I will admit
    to purchasing an item or 2 under her label. I can't say I've
    had a gripe about anything I've bought. I bought a cutting
    board and some stainless burner covers for the stove.

    Michael
    --
    Deathbed statement...

    "Codeine . . . bourbon." ~~Tallulah Bankhead, actress, d.
    December 12, 1968
     
  12. Thanks for the replies. I took another look at my bookshelf.
    I have _Entertaining_ and _Hors d'Oeuvres_ and a holiday
    magazine on cookies. What a surprising mix of styles and
    advice. The cookie recipes are ones I've used. The
    instructions and photographs are clear. She answers basic
    questions that someone new to baking might ask. (If you bake
    all the time, "cream butter and sugar" is automatic. If
    you're new to it, you might appreciate a detailed
    explanation on what that means in terms of temperature and
    texture. Hell, even if you're an old pro, it is nice to have
    the nuances explained.) I like the chocolate ginger snaps.

    Then I looked through the other books and was reminded of
    why I never use them. I could also see how her abrasive
    personality gets confused with her basic cooking advice. I
    love to entertain, but my style is so different. There's
    something precious, cold and exacting even in the cookbooks.
    Hard to pinpoint.

    --Lia
     
  13. Wardna

    Wardna Guest

    >Questions of innocence, guilt, crime, punishment and
    >celebrity aside, what do y'all think of Martha Stewart's
    >recipes and cookbooks?

    Never looked at them. I found the idea of "branding" good
    taste so offensive that I ignored her and her enterprise
    whenever they emerged.

    Neil
     
  14. Nancy Dooley

    Nancy Dooley Guest

    Julia Altshuler <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]_s54>...
    > Questions of innocence, guilt, crime, punishment and
    > celebrity aside, what do y'all think of Martha Stewart's
    > recipes and cookbooks? I have one, Entertaining, I think.
    > I don't use it regularly, but the few times I've cooked
    > out of it, I was pleased. At this point in my life, I'm
    > making more simple, old standby recipes so Stewart's
    > recipes strike me as too fancy, too much emphasis on
    > presentation, but I've been known every now and then go
    > for presentation too. Thoughts?
    >
    >
    > --Lia

    I don't have any of her cookbooks, but every single recipe
    of hers that I've used, especially the "101s," have been
    "perfect" and gotten rave reviews. I have no complaints,
    whatsoever. I don't believe her recipes are difficult so
    much as they require a lot of attention to detail, which
    doesn't bother me. I've looked through the appetizer book
    and think I'd like to have it, but right now, I'm collecting
    pop-up books. ;-)

    N.
     
  15. "Julia Altshuler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s02...
    > Thanks for the replies. I took another look at my
    > bookshelf. I have _Entertaining_ and _Hors d'Oeuvres_ and
    > a holiday magazine on cookies. What a surprising mix of
    > styles and advice. The cookie recipes are ones I've used.
    > The instructions and photographs are clear. She answers
    > basic questions that someone new to baking might ask. (If
    > you bake all the time, "cream butter and sugar" is
    > automatic. If you're new to it, you might appreciate a
    > detailed explanation on what that means in terms of
    > temperature and texture. Hell, even if you're an old pro,
    > it is nice to have the nuances explained.) I like the
    > chocolate ginger snaps.
    >
    >
    > Then I looked through the other books and was reminded of
    > why I never use them. I could also see how her abrasive
    > personality gets confused with her basic cooking advice. I
    > love to entertain, but my style is so different. There's
    > something precious, cold and exacting even in the
    > cookbooks. Hard to pinpoint.
    >
    >
    > --Lia
    It saddens me that she is condemned for her personality and
    seems to bring out the bitchiness in people. I think we all
    have known others like her that are detail oriented and
    don't make friends easily or quickly. A person with a bubbly
    personality and charming wit seems to have no trouble at all
    in getting things from others without complaint. I know that
    is the way the world works, but it has always struck me as
    so unfair. Janet
     
  16. Fudge

    Fudge Guest

    I wish Martha would get it right. Sometimes, the stunts,
    recipes, whatever do not work. Remember the episode about
    growing garlic in your back yard? WRONG. The stunt of
    bringing her live chickens into the studio with Regis
    Philbin with the chickens shitting all over the place was
    grotesque. Yes, she does practice a little bitchcraft, but I
    don't think she should go to prison. I think her recipes and
    cookbooks suck. Period.

    Farmer John

    "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Lia asked:
    >
    > > Questions of innocence, guilt, crime, punishment and
    > > celebrity aside, what do y'all think of Martha Stewart's
    > > recipes and cookbooks?
    >
    > Last Thanksgiving, I followed her gravy-making recipe, and
    > thought it was extremely good.
    >
    > Bob
     
  17. On 10 Mar 2004 08:38:08 -0800, [email protected] (Nancy
    Dooley) arranged random neurons, so they looked like this:

    >I don't have any of her cookbooks, but every single recipe
    >of hers that I've used, especially the "101s," have been
    >"perfect" and gotten rave reviews. I have no complaints,
    >whatsoever. I don't believe her recipes are difficult so
    >much as they require a lot of attention to detail, which
    >doesn't bother me. I've looked through the appetizer book
    >and think I'd like to have it, but right now, I'm
    >collecting pop-up books. ;-)
    >
    Nancy, I have her _Entertaining_ book and have not been
    impressed with the recipes atall atall. I tried a cream
    cheese stuffed cherry tomato recipe topped with red and
    black caviar that was a disaster. The caviar bled into the
    cream cheese and looked horrible, not to mention not a taste
    sensation. I'd estimate 40% of the recipes I've tried out of
    that book have been gawdawful to pedestrian and I fancy
    myself a fairly good "recipe reader." Much of the recipes
    seem to be long on presentation (with the aforementioned
    glaring exception) and short on taste.

    And lovely to see your post, toots! You are missed!

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret
    had been as old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had
    been as full as the waitress', it would have been a very
    good dinner." Anonymous.

    To reply, remove replace "shcox" with "cox"
     
  18. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On 10 Mar 2004 16:27:51 GMT, [email protected] (WardNA) wrote:

    > >Questions of innocence, guilt, crime, punishment and
    > >celebrity aside, what do y'all think of Martha Stewart's
    > >recipes and cookbooks?
    >
    > Never looked at them. I found the idea of "branding" good
    > taste so offensive that I ignored her and her enterprise
    > whenever they emerged.
    >
    What other brands do you boycott? Branding is everything
    these days.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  19. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Janet Bostwick wrote:

    > It saddens me that she is condemned for her personality
    > and seems to bring out the bitchiness in people. I think
    > we all have known others like her that are detail oriented
    > and don't make friends easily or quickly. A person with a
    > bubbly personality and charming wit seems to have no
    > trouble at all in getting things from others without
    > complaint. I know that is the way the world works, but it
    > has always struck me as so unfair.

    Some of the best informed and most technically competent
    teachers I've ever had were also very low on the emotional
    IQ scale. It never really bothered me.

    --
    Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot)
    com
     
  20. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 19:44:04 -0800, Terry Pulliam Burd
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 10 Mar 2004 08:38:08 -0800,
    > [email protected] (Nancy Dooley) arranged
    > random neurons, so they looked like this:
    >
    > >I don't have any of her cookbooks, but every single
    > >recipe of hers that I've used, especially the "101s,"
    > >have been "perfect" and gotten rave reviews. I have no
    > >complaints, whatsoever. I don't believe her recipes are
    > >difficult so much as they require a lot of attention to
    > >detail, which doesn't bother me. I've looked through the
    > >appetizer book and think I'd like to have it, but right
    > >now, I'm collecting pop-up books. ;-)
    > >
    > Nancy, I have her _Entertaining_ book and have not been
    > impressed with the recipes atall atall. I tried a cream
    > cheese stuffed cherry tomato recipe topped with red and
    > black caviar that was a disaster. The caviar bled into
    > the cream cheese and looked horrible, not to mention not
    > a taste sensation.

    Dahlink, you simply are NOT using the same quality of caviar
    that Mahtha uses. If you use the dyed stuff, you can expect
    it to bleed.

    > I'd estimate 40% of the recipes I've tried out of that
    > book have been gawdawful to pedestrian and I fancy myself
    > a fairly good "recipe reader." Much of the recipes seem
    > to be long on presentation (with the aforementioned
    > glaring exception) and short on taste.

    Well, Hruumph. Don't you know presentation is EVERYTHING?

    Personally, I haven't tried many of her recipes... I'm
    trying desperately to think of ONE. I do have her
    Entertaining Book, but it's not on my cookbook shelf...
    it's with my clothes. When you think about it, that's
    telling. LOL!
    >
    > And lovely to see your post, toots! You are missed!
    >
    My sentiments, exactly!

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
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