My New Years Disaster

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by RMiller, Jan 1, 2005.

  1. RMiller

    RMiller Guest

    Gumbo was what I intended to make, a good way to start off 2005.

    All my ingredients were together, and tho I have been nursing a cold, I was
    ready to go.

    Started with the roux, this is the key to the whole dish. You have to take it
    slow and easy, I did, stirring constantly, for about an hour over low heat.
    I watched it tun brown and was pleased.

    Added the trinity and a few other things and put ot on simmer. Wait a minute,
    I better taste it.... OMYGAWD , it was awful..... The oonly thing I can think
    of that happened , is that I burnt the roux somehow. It did not look burnt, and
    it did not smell; burnt ... The cold I have probably blocked my sense of
    smell.

    Yes, ended tossing the whole mess away. All the times I have made Gumbo, and
    mine is delicious... usually.--- this has never happened.

    2005 is not starting off well. Happy New Year to everyone though..

    Rosie
     
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  2. GregoryD

    GregoryD Guest

    On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 00:28:13 +0000, RMiller wrote:

    > Gumbo was what I intended to make, a good way to start off 2005.
    >
    > All my ingredients were together, and tho I have been nursing a cold, I was
    > ready to go.
    >
    > Started with the roux, this is the key to the whole dish. You have to take it
    > slow and easy, I did, stirring constantly, for about an hour over low heat.
    > I watched it tun brown and was pleased.


    I cannot fathom why it would take anyone near an hour to make roux for
    a gumbo. If you have even heat distribution and are stirring it
    constantly, it shouldn't take more than 15-20 minutes tops to get to a
    shade of brown that would be considered the right amount of cooking for
    a gumbo roux. If you have any black specks in it, throw it out and start
    over. If it's any darker than maybe a shade more than cardboard, throw
    keep it, but use it for a stew. You want gumbo, not coffee.

    GregoryD
     
  3. notbob

    notbob Guest

    On 2005-01-02, GregoryD <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I cannot fathom why it would take anyone near an hour to make roux for
    > a gumbo. If you have even heat distribution and are stirring it
    > constantly, it shouldn't take more than 15-20 minutes tops to get to a
    > shade of brown that would be considered the right amount of cooking for
    > a gumbo roux.....


    Tell 'em, Greg!

    It takes me about 8 mins to make a fudgecycle brown roux cooking at just
    below smoking temps and constantly stirring with a hi-temp spatula in a
    copper bottomed pan. OTOH, I've heard a hands-off approach is to do it in
    the oven for about an hour. I don't recall the temp.

    nb
     
  4. GregoryD

    GregoryD Guest

    On Sun, 02 Jan 2005 04:12:51 +0000, notbob wrote:

    > On 2005-01-02, GregoryD <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I cannot fathom why it would take anyone near an hour to make roux for
    >> a gumbo. If you have even heat distribution and are stirring it
    >> constantly, it shouldn't take more than 15-20 minutes tops to get to a
    >> shade of brown that would be considered the right amount of cooking for
    >> a gumbo roux.....

    >
    > Tell 'em, Greg!
    >
    > It takes me about 8 mins to make a fudgecycle brown roux cooking at just
    > below smoking temps and constantly stirring with a hi-temp spatula in a
    > copper bottomed pan. OTOH, I've heard a hands-off approach is to do it in
    > the oven for about an hour. I don't recall the temp.


    I usually do mine for gumbo on medium-high heat and it usually takes 10-12
    minutes to get the color I want. It can be a little more or less brown...
    it's not an exact science, but if its dark brown or darker, you're
    definitely going to taste it in the gumbo. I prefer to keep my roux a bit
    lighter and use smoked meats if that's what I'm going for. Smoked turkey
    necks and andouille made locally works great in this instance. Of course,
    I live in shouting distance of New Orleans. :)

    My dad thought he'd try since my uncle has gotten into cooking... apparently he
    started out alright with the recipe my mom gave him, but the neighbor came
    over and added another half cup of flour to it in the middle of his
    cooking process... he ended up burning one half and kept the other half
    raw. Yuck. Cajun men are normally fabulous cooks because they cook few
    things, but cook them well... normally for the big get-togethers. My dad,
    on the other hand, is not allowed to touch anything but the barbecue pit. :)

    No two people do it the same. I, for example, have never really enjoyed
    okra in my gumbo. I feel it's just filler at best and an unnecessary
    thickening agent at worst. I do, however, demand that I make my own stock
    before making the gumbo, and I highly dislike anything in there that I
    have to pick out. So if I'm making a chicken or duck gumbo, I make a
    stock first, then pick the meat off the bones and add them to the pot
    later. I also tend to, when using crabs, to put a good bit of lump crab
    meat in the pot, use some whole crabs to make the stock, then eat the
    whole crabs later.

    My mom doesn't use a stock; she adds water and Worcestershire sauce and
    something else. My grandmother's is different still (I'm convinced she
    adds a hefty portion of tomato paste... there are NO tomato products in
    mine or anyone else I know), and my uncle's is like a toned down version
    of mine, but he adds bay leaves whereas I tend to add a bit of gumbo file'
    at the end just to flavor it up a bit and keep a bottle handy for others.
    Some people don't know the difference between gumbo and courtbouillion,
    but I'm not going to argue with them. :)

    And here's something for you... next time you make a gumbo after easter
    and you have all those leftover easter eggs, try it with shrimp, crab
    meat, and hardboiled eggs that you have cut in half... a bit of the yolks
    will dissolve into the gumbo, and the whites will soak up some of that
    gumbo flavor. It is freaking delicious.

    GregoryD
     
  5. sf

    sf Guest

    On 02 Jan 2005 00:28:13 GMT, [email protected] (RMiller)
    wrote:

    > Gumbo was what I intended to make, a good way to start off 2005.
    >
    > All my ingredients were together, and tho I have been nursing a cold, I was
    > ready to go.
    >
    > Started with the roux, this is the key to the whole dish. You have to take it
    > slow and easy, I did, stirring constantly, for about an hour over low heat.
    > I watched it tun brown and was pleased.
    >
    > Added the trinity and a few other things and put ot on simmer. Wait a minute,
    > I better taste it.... OMYGAWD , it was awful..... The oonly thing I can think
    > of that happened , is that I burnt the roux somehow. It did not look burnt, and
    > it did not smell; burnt ... The cold I have probably blocked my sense of
    > smell.
    >

    Sorry to hear about that. I think you're right about your
    cold affecting how it turned out.
    >
    > Yes, ended tossing the whole mess away. All the times I have made Gumbo, and
    > mine is delicious... usually.--- this has never happened.
    >

    So, what did you do with the main attraction of your gumbo?
    Was is a seafood gumbo? If so, you could have gone on to
    make choppino.

    > 2005 is not starting off well. Happy New Year to everyone though..


    {{{virtual pat on shoulder}}}

    2005 will get better when you are well again.

    sf
     
  6. RMiller

    RMiller Guest

    >
    >> I cannot fathom why it would take anyone near an hour to make roux for
    >> a gumbo. If you have even heat distribution and are stirring it
    >> constantly, it shouldn't take more than 15-20 minutes tops to get to a
    >> shade of brown that would be considered the right amount of cooking for
    >> a gumbo roux.....

    >
    >Tell 'em, Greg!
    >
    >It takes me about 8 mins to make a fudgecycle brown roux cooking at just
    >below smoking temps and constantly stirring with a hi-temp spatula in a
    >copper bottomed pan. OTOH, I've heard a hands-off approach is to do it in
    >the oven for about an hour. I don't recall the temp.
    >
    >nb


    I have never heard of anyone making a nice nutty brown roux in 8 minutes. I
    guess it is possible, I have always made mine very slowly , taking nearly and
    hour, always perfect till now !!!!

    I have heard there is a way to make it in the zapper, but I would never do
    that, I guess I feel it has to have the Hands on approach to make it " right "

    Different strokes, I think, But I am still astonished that one can make a nice
    roux in 8 minutes,
    Rosie
     
  7. On 02 Jan 2005 19:01:15 GMT, [email protected] (RMiller) wrote:


    >
    >I have never heard of anyone making a nice nutty brown roux in 8 minutes. I
    >guess it is possible, I have always made mine very slowly , taking nearly and
    >hour, always perfect till now !!!!
    >
    > I have heard there is a way to make it in the zapper, but I would never do
    >that, I guess I feel it has to have the Hands on approach to make it " right "
    >
    >Different strokes, I think, But I am still astonished that one can make a nice
    >roux in 8 minutes,
    >Rosie


    If you have Paul Prudhomme's book, Louisiana Kitchen, he uses a method
    which takes very little time. But it involves high heat...and very,
    very close attention. I have done it his way a few times, and it
    goes very fast from a light color to burnt, if you are not careful.
    But it does produce a very good roux, if done right.

    Christine
     
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