My relaxing daily commute



T

Tamyka Bell

Guest
This should explain why I have to call home each time I make it safely
to uni...

First, the stats:

Cycling to uni - new PB today 57 minutes, usually about 65 minutes.
Travel outside of peak hours to use the roads, because the cycleway out
near my area is downright scary, especially at night.

Walk/bus or walk/bus/citycat to uni - approx 65 mins during peak hour
(lots of buses on the busway) or approx 105 mins late night/early
morning; cost $1.60 each way.

Walk/train - just not practical, walking to the station takes 40
minutes, nearest station to uni is about 30 minutes, and I have to
interchange at the city; cost $1.60 each way.

Drive - 25 minutes off peak, 45 minutes peak hour, 60 minutes peak hour
in the wet, 90 minutes if there's a four car pileup on the bridge (not a
frequent occurrence). Parking $2.50, petrol approx $3.00 each way. I
don't include rego because I need my car to get to and from my other
job, so I'd need to have my car registered anyway.

So unlike most of the commuters who have piped up about how grand
cycling is, I actually have a time/money tradeoff to consider. In terms
of the stress levels... well I go to uni early anwyay, so the driving is
quick and easy. One day a week I go to work straight after uni one day
to circus and cycling home at 10:30 pm is not my thing, not out where I
live, so I like to either drive on those days or drive to work/circus
(free parking) and then ride to/from uni). If it's wet, it takes the
same amount of time to ride or drive, and if I drive I stay dry. The
public transport is improving but I only ever use it if I am too tired
to ride back home or if it's peak hour when I'm travelling.

The best thing about cycling is it allows me to double up on my exercise
- I don't need to find another time to go for a ride. So the fact is,
the only reason I ride is because I want to and I like the exercise.
Sometimes when I'm poor I ride because I need to. But the last few weeks
I've been massively busy so I've had to drive - the cost to park/travel
meant less to me than the time!

Now this morning I finally got back on the bike and rode in, it was a
beautiful morning.

First I copped some abuse from a driver down on Logan Rd. I consoled
myself by thinking that he probably was born and (in)bred in Woodridge
or some other really dumb suburb.

Then I encountered a fellow who had something to prove. Well I assume he
did, but I don't know what it was because he never backed it up; after
passing him on a few hills I had a chat and that was a good thing
because had I become a statistic he would've been a witness. He was a
reasonably nice bloke.

Heading through Mt Gravatt, a truck driver seemed offended that I passed
him taking of from lights. ("Hello, I weight a lot less, of course I
took off, I thought it would be better to clear the intersection than to
eat your diesel fumes.") Despite there being another lane heading our
way, totally clear, he didn't want to change lanes. Begrudgingly did so.
Didn't even make a half-arsed effort to look like he cared about
clearing me - as soon as the nose of the truck was past he started
moving left, was about a foot away from me by the time I reached the
door (with me rapidly slowing, veering left and considering jumping the
kerb into the many bus-stop seats), brushing my shoulder as his tail
passed. Hmmm, good morning.

Rest of the ride was moderately uneventful, until Coro Drive bikepath
(shared path) where the bell once again proved to NOT work, as a pack of
cyclists passed on the other side several women didn't even think to
give a bit more clearance, and coming up a hill towards a crazy runner
in the middle of the path in a blind section, I was madly ringing my
bell AND calling out "cyclist right, passing on your right, cyclist
right" and she swore at me when I passed her - oh, she had earphones on
and hadn't heard me. I'm such a bad person, apparently I should have
ridden up, stepped off, tapped her on the shoulder "excuse me ma'am,
would you mind shifting a little to the left so that I may safely pass
you?"

Closer to uni I had to deal with small cycling groups cutting corners in
really unsafe places (they're lucky it was me they cut off and not (1)
another such cycling group or (2) a car).

SO... that's my relaxing daily commute. I think I'll hitch a ride home.
Brisbane drivers just do their best to make it hell for cyclists.
 
R

rcmbnt

Guest
"Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> This should explain why I have to call home each time I make it safely
> to uni...
>
> First, the stats:
>
> Cycling to uni - new PB today 57 minutes, usually about 65 minutes.
> Travel outside of peak hours to use the roads, because the cycleway out
> near my area is downright scary, especially at night.
>
> Walk/bus or walk/bus/citycat to uni - approx 65 mins during peak hour
> (lots of buses on the busway) or approx 105 mins late night/early
> morning; cost $1.60 each way.
>
> Walk/train - just not practical, walking to the station takes 40
> minutes, nearest station to uni is about 30 minutes, and I have to
> interchange at the city; cost $1.60 each way.
>
> Drive - 25 minutes off peak, 45 minutes peak hour, 60 minutes peak hour
> in the wet, 90 minutes if there's a four car pileup on the bridge (not a
> frequent occurrence). Parking $2.50, petrol approx $3.00 each way. I
> don't include rego because I need my car to get to and from my other
> job, so I'd need to have my car registered anyway.
>
> So unlike most of the commuters who have piped up about how grand
> cycling is, I actually have a time/money tradeoff to consider. In terms
> of the stress levels... well I go to uni early anwyay, so the driving is
> quick and easy. One day a week I go to work straight after uni one day
> to circus and cycling home at 10:30 pm is not my thing, not out where I
> live, so I like to either drive on those days or drive to work/circus
> (free parking) and then ride to/from uni). If it's wet, it takes the
> same amount of time to ride or drive, and if I drive I stay dry. The
> public transport is improving but I only ever use it if I am too tired
> to ride back home or if it's peak hour when I'm travelling.
>
> The best thing about cycling is it allows me to double up on my exercise
> - I don't need to find another time to go for a ride. So the fact is,
> the only reason I ride is because I want to and I like the exercise.
> Sometimes when I'm poor I ride because I need to. But the last few weeks
> I've been massively busy so I've had to drive - the cost to park/travel
> meant less to me than the time!
>
> Now this morning I finally got back on the bike and rode in, it was a
> beautiful morning.
>
> First I copped some abuse from a driver down on Logan Rd. I consoled
> myself by thinking that he probably was born and (in)bred in Woodridge
> or some other really dumb suburb.
>
> Then I encountered a fellow who had something to prove. Well I assume he
> did, but I don't know what it was because he never backed it up; after
> passing him on a few hills I had a chat and that was a good thing
> because had I become a statistic he would've been a witness. He was a
> reasonably nice bloke.
>
> Heading through Mt Gravatt, a truck driver seemed offended that I passed
> him taking of from lights. ("Hello, I weight a lot less, of course I
> took off, I thought it would be better to clear the intersection than to
> eat your diesel fumes.") Despite there being another lane heading our
> way, totally clear, he didn't want to change lanes. Begrudgingly did so.
> Didn't even make a half-arsed effort to look like he cared about
> clearing me - as soon as the nose of the truck was past he started
> moving left, was about a foot away from me by the time I reached the
> door (with me rapidly slowing, veering left and considering jumping the
> kerb into the many bus-stop seats), brushing my shoulder as his tail
> passed. Hmmm, good morning.
>
> Rest of the ride was moderately uneventful, until Coro Drive bikepath
> (shared path) where the bell once again proved to NOT work, as a pack of
> cyclists passed on the other side several women didn't even think to
> give a bit more clearance, and coming up a hill towards a crazy runner
> in the middle of the path in a blind section, I was madly ringing my
> bell AND calling out "cyclist right, passing on your right, cyclist
> right" and she swore at me when I passed her - oh, she had earphones on
> and hadn't heard me. I'm such a bad person, apparently I should have
> ridden up, stepped off, tapped her on the shoulder "excuse me ma'am,
> would you mind shifting a little to the left so that I may safely pass
> you?"
>
> Closer to uni I had to deal with small cycling groups cutting corners in
> really unsafe places (they're lucky it was me they cut off and not (1)
> another such cycling group or (2) a car).
>
> SO ... that's my relaxing daily commute. I think I'll hitch a ride home.
> Brisbane drivers just do their best to make it hell for cyclists.


Ahh the good old days. My relaxing daily commute goes something like this.

I leave my house - travel about 250m before joining a newly formed bike
lane. The road used to be two lanes but the council in their infinite
wisdom decided 1 lane for cars was more than enough and a nice big cycle
lane could be made from the other (I just love them council guys). Anyway I
work on an island so I get to cycle over a causeway that has beautiful ocean
on either side, no smog, all traffic heading in the same direction, all the
drivers giving you a wide berth, being beeped and waved at by you passing
work collegues in their cars. Oh and as I ride past the beach now that it
is summer there are also plenty of yummy mummys to look at as well.

hmmm come to think of it, I dont miss the good old days.
 

oely

New Member
Jun 4, 2004
231
0
0
Tamyka Bell said:
ow this morning I finally got back on the bike and rode in, it was a
beautiful morning.

First I copped some abuse from a driver down on Logan Rd. I consoled
myself by thinking that he probably was born and (in)bred in Woodridge
or some other really dumb suburb.

Then I encountered a fellow who had something to prove. Well I assume he
did, but I don't know what it was because he never backed it up; after
passing him on a few hills I had a chat and that was a good thing
because had I become a statistic he would've been a witness. He was a
reasonably nice bloke.

Heading through Mt Gravatt, a truck driver seemed offended that I passed
him taking of from lights. ("Hello, I weight a lot less, of course I
took off, I thought it would be better to clear the intersection than to
eat your diesel fumes.") Despite there being another lane heading our
way, totally clear, he didn't want to change lanes. Begrudgingly did so.
Didn't even make a half-arsed effort to look like he cared about
clearing me - as soon as the nose of the truck was past he started
moving left, was about a foot away from me by the time I reached the
door (with me rapidly slowing, veering left and considering jumping the
kerb into the many bus-stop seats), brushing my shoulder as his tail
passed. Hmmm, good morning.

Rest of the ride was moderately uneventful, until Coro Drive bikepath
(shared path) where the bell once again proved to NOT work, as a pack of
cyclists passed on the other side several women didn't even think to
give a bit more clearance, and coming up a hill towards a crazy runner
in the middle of the path in a blind section, I was madly ringing my
bell AND calling out "cyclist right, passing on your right, cyclist
right" and she swore at me when I passed her - oh, she had earphones on
and hadn't heard me. I'm such a bad person, apparently I should have
ridden up, stepped off, tapped her on the shoulder "excuse me ma'am,
would you mind shifting a little to the left so that I may safely pass
you?"

Closer to uni I had to deal with small cycling groups cutting corners in
really unsafe places (they're lucky it was me they cut off and not (1)
another such cycling group or (2) a car).

SO... that's my relaxing daily commute. I think I'll hitch a ride home.
Brisbane drivers just do their best to make it hell for cyclists.

Gotta be honest, after reading so many quite horrible experiences on here about riding/commuting etc... in Aus im not looking all that forward to going home. I forgot how the attitudes there to anything on 2 wheels with pedals are so differant. Im not looking forward to returning in general but with the Dutch Immigration people doing their best to stop me from working it could be a distinct possibility soon as the funds are running down. I guess on the flipside though it does motivate me to get out and ride here more and enjoy it while it lasts. If only i could live 6 months a year in each place....
 
T

Tamyka Bell

Guest
rcmbnt wrote:
>
> "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]

<insert horrible rant and then snip>
>
> Ahh the good old days. My relaxing daily commute goes something like this.
>
> I leave my house - travel about 250m before joining a newly formed bike
> lane. The road used to be two lanes but the council in their infinite
> wisdom decided 1 lane for cars was more than enough and a nice big cycle
> lane could be made from the other (I just love them council guys). Anyway I
> work on an island so I get to cycle over a causeway that has beautiful ocean
> on either side, no smog, all traffic heading in the same direction, all the
> drivers giving you a wide berth, being beeped and waved at by you passing
> work collegues in their cars. Oh and as I ride past the beach now that it
> is summer there are also plenty of yummy mummys to look at as well.
>
> hmmm come to think of it, I dont miss the good old days.


Wait, where are you, and how do I get a job on that there island...

T
 
T

Terry Collins

Guest
Tamyka Bell wrote:

...snip......

> Heading through Mt Gravatt, a truck driver seemed offended that I passed
> him taking of from lights. ("Hello, I weight a lot less, of course I
> took off, I thought it would be better to clear the intersection than to
> eat your diesel fumes.")


Truck? Try a Trans Am, 6 out of 9 lights in Hunter St, Newcastle. Man,
was he getting ****** and I'm no roadie and I was on a step above a
K-Mart bike {;-).


I only posted that because I'm envious that I haven't been able to find
any local employment to bicycle commute to. Nope, I'm not joining the
other M5 commuter.
 
T

Tamyka Bell

Guest
Terry Collins wrote:
>
> Tamyka Bell wrote:
>
> ..snip......
>
> > Heading through Mt Gravatt, a truck driver seemed offended that I passed
> > him taking of from lights. ("Hello, I weight a lot less, of course I
> > took off, I thought it would be better to clear the intersection than to
> > eat your diesel fumes.")

>
> Truck? Try a Trans Am, 6 out of 9 lights in Hunter St, Newcastle. Man,
> was he getting ****** and I'm no roadie and I was on a step above a
> K-Mart bike {;-).
>
> I only posted that because I'm envious that I haven't been able to find
> any local employment to bicycle commute to. Nope, I'm not joining the
> other M5 commuter.


oh dear, you just highlighted my typo, I am so embarrassed...

where's hippy this morning?

T
 
N

NickZX6R

Guest
oely wrote:
> Tamyka Bell Wrote:
>
>>
>>ow this morning I finally got back on the bike and rode in, it was a
>>beautiful morning.
>>
>>First I copped some abuse from a driver down on Logan Rd. I consoled
>>myself by thinking that he probably was born and (in)bred in Woodridge
>>or some other really dumb suburb.
>>
>>Then I encountered a fellow who had something to prove. Well I assume
>>he
>>did, but I don't know what it was because he never backed it up; after
>>passing him on a few hills I had a chat and that was a good thing
>>because had I become a statistic he would've been a witness. He was a
>>reasonably nice bloke.
>>
>>Heading through Mt Gravatt, a truck driver seemed offended that I
>>passed
>>him taking of from lights. ("Hello, I weight a lot less, of course I
>>took off, I thought it would be better to clear the intersection than
>>to
>>eat your diesel fumes.") Despite there being another lane heading our
>>way, totally clear, he didn't want to change lanes. Begrudgingly did
>>so.
>>Didn't even make a half-arsed effort to look like he cared about
>>clearing me - as soon as the nose of the truck was past he started
>>moving left, was about a foot away from me by the time I reached the
>>door (with me rapidly slowing, veering left and considering jumping
>>the
>>kerb into the many bus-stop seats), brushing my shoulder as his tail
>>passed. Hmmm, good morning.
>>
>>Rest of the ride was moderately uneventful, until Coro Drive bikepath
>>(shared path) where the bell once again proved to NOT work, as a pack
>>of
>>cyclists passed on the other side several women didn't even think to
>>give a bit more clearance, and coming up a hill towards a crazy runner
>>in the middle of the path in a blind section, I was madly ringing my
>>bell AND calling out "cyclist right, passing on your right, cyclist
>>right" and she swore at me when I passed her - oh, she had earphones
>>on
>>and hadn't heard me. I'm such a bad person, apparently I should have
>>ridden up, stepped off, tapped her on the shoulder "excuse me ma'am,
>>would you mind shifting a little to the left so that I may safely pass
>>you?"
>>
>>Closer to uni I had to deal with small cycling groups cutting corners
>>in
>>really unsafe places (they're lucky it was me they cut off and not (1)
>>another such cycling group or (2) a car).
>>
>>SO... that's my relaxing daily commute. I think I'll hitch a ride
>>home.
>>Brisbane drivers just do their best to make it hell for cyclists.

>
>
> Gotta be honest, after reading so many quite horrible experiences on
> here about riding/commuting etc... in Aus im not looking all that
> forward to going home. I forgot how the attitudes there to anything on
> 2 wheels with pedals are so differant. Im not looking forward to
> returning in general but with the Dutch Immigration people doing their
> best to stop me from working it could be a distinct possibility soon as
> the funds are running down. I guess on the flipside though it does
> motivate me to get out and ride here more and enjoy it while it lasts.
> If only i could live 6 months a year in each place....
>
>



But...I think most people are more likely to post bad experiences than
good, wrongly suggesting that most riding experiences are bad.

In my experience, bad 'incidents' are only a tiny part of my riding.

Having said that, I think it takes experience and skill to negotiate
major city traffic with calm and composure :)

--
Nick
 
S

Stuart Lamble

Guest
On 2004-11-18, NickZX6R <[email protected]> wrote:
> Having said that, I think it takes experience and skill to negotiate
> major city traffic with calm and composure :)


Oh, I do it with calm and composure. Every time I get tooted, or cut
off, I calmly (and with a great deal of composure) give them a two
finger salute. :)

--
My Usenet From: address now expires after two weeks. If you email me, and
the mail bounces, try changing the bit before the "@" to "usenet".
 
T

Tamyka Bell

Guest
Stuart Lamble wrote:
>
> On 2004-11-18, NickZX6R <[email protected]> wrote:
> > Having said that, I think it takes experience and skill to negotiate
> > major city traffic with calm and composure :)

>
> Oh, I do it with calm and composure. Every time I get tooted, or cut
> off, I calmly (and with a great deal of composure) give them a two
> finger salute. :)


Must be calm and composed, and must make what I'm doing look really,
really easy... just to rub it in. Anyone noticed how you put a bit more
effort in when people can see you? I used to do the 2nd half of a run
where more people would see me, good motivation to put in.

T
 
T

TimC

Guest
On Thu, 18 Nov 2004 at 00:44 GMT, Stuart Lamble (aka Bruce)
was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
> On 2004-11-18, NickZX6R <[email protected]> wrote:
>> Having said that, I think it takes experience and skill to negotiate
>> major city traffic with calm and composure :)

>
> Oh, I do it with calm and composure. Every time I get tooted, or cut
> off, I calmly (and with a great deal of composure) give them a two
> finger salute. :)


Can't rememember whether I mentioned my trip along...was it North road
along to St Kilda? I'm riding relatively close to the gutter, and some
guy toots his horn. So I look in my rear view mirror, and see it's
some guy in a posh car. So I pull out further from the gutter. For
500m, he toots his horn. By the end of it, I'm about 3/4 of the lane
to the right. Never did occur to him...

Course, as soon as he overtook me, he turned into a left side
street. Didn't cut me off, but could have possibly waited that extra
20m, could he?

--
TimC -- http://astronomy.swin.edu.au/staff/tconnors/
If you ever fear that machines will surpass humans in intelligence,
just ask Microsoft to write the OS. -- POTU in RHOD
 

aeek

New Member
Jun 15, 2004
757
0
0
TimC said:
guy toots his horn. So I look in my rear view mirror, and see it's
some guy in a posh car. So I pull out further from the gutter. For
500m, he toots his horn. By the end of it, I'm about 3/4 of the lane
to the right. Never did occur to him...

Course, as soon as he overtook me, he turned into a left side
street. Didn't cut me off, but could have possibly waited that extra
20m, could he?

One of my pleasures is spotting a patient motor signaling left behind me,
checking that there are no other vehicles, signal, then move to the right hand lane.

Of my commute, its a 15km, 15 minute drive + 10 minute walk (I hate spending seconds looking for a park), bonus: no fee vs a 17km, 45 minute ride.
I used to do a 14.5km, 35 minutes ride but these days I prefer playing with the traffic to sharing with pedestrians and path cyclists.
 
H

hippy

Guest
"NickZX6R" <[email protected]
> But...I think most people are more likely to post bad experiences than
> good, wrongly suggesting that most riding experiences are bad.


True.. I only really post the bad stuff. The good stuff is
actually quite boring "Had a great ride today.. didn't
even notice I was pedaling.. beat my PB.. won the race"
Well.. maybe winning a race ain't so boring but
commuting is pretty boring relative to the 'incidents' that
occasionally happen. Plus, it's a good way to get some
stress off your chest.. vent it out to understanding riders :)

> Having said that, I think it takes experience and skill to negotiate
> major city traffic with calm and composure :)


Calm and composure? What are they?

hippy
 
H

hippy

Guest
"Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> where's hippy this morning?


hippy slept in and took today off after spending
WAY too much time at work...

So now he's undone the sleep in by staying up
too late.. but there's only POETS day left so it
should go quickly.

I can't give you a cool commute story.. but I can
tell you that I had my first ride on the track (for
the season) tonight. I waited for the novice
session to finish and jumped on.
I have issues with Miche's rear cog - I couldn't get
the Miche cog off the Miche cog-mount. So I had
to run 49/18 rather than my usual 49/16 which is
already a quite small training gear... Gotta see if
there's some tool available to get this stupid thing
off. Position on the bike sucks too after all the road
riding I've been doing.. but that's probably TOB*
and flexability related. Strange noises are WAY
more unnerving when you have no brakes!
I also want to get another set of SPD-SLs because
I don't trust my SPDs for high-power track starts.
Now that all the **** at work is done there'll be
more HOB**.
I hope Max is feeling better after his crash..

* Time On Bike
**Hippy On Bike

hippy
 

oely

New Member
Jun 4, 2004
231
0
0
NickZX6R said:
But...I think most people are more likely to post bad experiences than
good, wrongly suggesting that most riding experiences are bad.

In my experience, bad 'incidents' are only a tiny part of my riding.

Having said that, I think it takes experience and skill to negotiate
major city traffic with calm and composure :)

--
Nick

Thats true about the whole bad experiences thing, and i wouldn´t really expect people posting about uneventful rides. But cyclists over here can be spoilt with decent bike lanes, roads and attitudes from motorists and i´ll miss that if i return to Sydney.

Now having said all that i think i might vent that i hate driving here. It´s frustration from start to finish. Indicators are rarely used at all. You´d think people are being fined if they have indicated and moved safely into another lane. Then if on the odd occasion it is used, the motorist has already moved into the lane making an indicator rather pointless. Ok Ok im done you wont hear another peep outta me on motorists here, just as there wont be any more cyclists venting frustrations on here? :)
 
R

rcmbnt

Guest
"Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> rcmbnt wrote:
>>
>> "Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]

> <insert horrible rant and then snip>
>>
>> Ahh the good old days. My relaxing daily commute goes something like
>> this.
>>
>> I leave my house - travel about 250m before joining a newly formed bike
>> lane. The road used to be two lanes but the council in their infinite
>> wisdom decided 1 lane for cars was more than enough and a nice big cycle
>> lane could be made from the other (I just love them council guys).
>> Anyway I
>> work on an island so I get to cycle over a causeway that has beautiful
>> ocean
>> on either side, no smog, all traffic heading in the same direction, all
>> the
>> drivers giving you a wide berth, being beeped and waved at by you passing
>> work collegues in their cars. Oh and as I ride past the beach now that
>> it
>> is summer there are also plenty of yummy mummys to look at as well.
>>
>> hmmm come to think of it, I dont miss the good old days.

>
> Wait, where are you, and how do I get a job on that there island...
>
> T


I'm in WA and to get a job here - Join the navy :)

R
 
T

Tamyka Bell

Guest
rcmbnt wrote:
>

<snip>
>
> I'm in WA and to get a job here - Join the navy :)
>
> R


Don't think my army boss would like that. See you at the championships
next year, they're over my side of the country.
 

Similar threads

B
Replies
4
Views
1K
B