my saddle review

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by B Young, May 19, 2003.

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  1. B Young

    B Young Guest

    I know a lot of folks ask about saddles and a common answer is that "it depends on the individual."
    While this may be true, certainly some saddles may stand out in overall quality and general
    satisfaction. If you're looking to purchase a new saddle and have no idea where to start, I hope
    this might help.

    I was having major problems with soreness (not numbness) which the LBS and others told me was due to
    lack of time in the saddle. Although, I thought I was putting in enough miles where this wouldn't be
    true. My existing saddle was also an el-cheapo, a Cannondale Coda Nashbar closeout, $10 variety.
    Anyway the soreness would show up as soon as 20 miles and become almost unbearable closer to 40.

    My friend and I both switched to the Selle Italia ProLink Gelflow Trans Am. This is a very specific
    model, they have a similar model with a slightly different name which is NOT the same at all. Anyway
    this seat changed my ride significantly. A couple weeks after purchase we did an organized 76 mile
    tour with no issues whatsoever in the rear department where only 2 weeks before I was literally
    dying at around 40 mi. During a ferry crossing we saw a few other guys with the same saddle and
    their reviews were the same.

    What makes this saddle different? It doesn't look like any other saddle out there to me. The width
    in the back and the overall styling makes it just look more anatomically correct. Also, part of the
    rail system is carbon fiber, and it has an elastomer suspension. The saddle is 320 grams, but I can
    very easily say "who cares" about the exta 100 grams. I picked my up from Colorado Cyclist for 80
    bucks. It may be called the "Trans Am", but it rides like a Lexus to me!!!

    Good luck!
     
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  2. On Mon, 19 May 2003 17:37:02 +0000, B Young wrote:

    > My existing saddle was also an el-cheapo, a Cannondale Coda Nashbar closeout, $10 variety. Anyway
    > the soreness would show up as soon as 20 miles and become almost unbearable closer to 40.

    There is an old maxim that goes something like "You get what you pay for". In saddles this is
    probably true.

    > What makes this saddle different? It doesn't look like any other saddle out there to me. The width
    > in the back and the overall styling makes it just look more anatomically correct.

    Correct for whom?

    >  Also, part of the rail
    > system is carbon fiber,

    So?

    You'd have to have more than that to recommend a particular saddle. Each butt is different, and what
    works for you may not for the next guy.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | This is my religion. There is no need for temples; no need for _`\(,_ | complicated
    philosophy. Our own brain, our own heart is our (_)/ (_) | temple. The philosophy is kindness.
    --The Dalai Lama
     
  3. Psycholist

    Psycholist Guest

    Well,

    To each his own.

    I've been very happy with the basic Selle Italia Flite saddle for years. I've worn out quite a few.

    I recently moved to an area where the roads are mostly rough tar and gravel. I decided I needed a
    suspension seatpost or ... something.

    I read a review about the Koobi PRS saddle with elastomer suspension. What a fabulous saddle.
    It's truly remarkable how much more comfortable it is. I don't know that it would matter much if
    I were still on smooth roads, but if you're riding rough roads and want some relief without too
    much of a weight penalty, try the Koobi PRS. Oh ... it's made for Koobi by Selle Italia. It's a
    high quality saddle.

    Bob C. "B Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I know a lot of folks ask about saddles and a common answer is that "it depends on the
    > individual." While this may be true, certainly some saddles may stand out in overall quality and
    > general satisfaction. If you're looking to purchase a new saddle and have no idea where to start,
    > I hope this might help.
    >
    > I was having major problems with soreness (not numbness) which the LBS and others told me was due
    > to lack of time in the saddle. Although, I thought I was putting in enough miles where this
    > wouldn't be true. My existing saddle was also an el-cheapo, a Cannondale Coda Nashbar closeout,
    > $10 variety. Anyway the soreness would show up as soon as 20 miles and become almost unbearable
    > closer to 40.
    >
    > My friend and I both switched to the Selle Italia ProLink Gelflow Trans Am. This is a very
    > specific model, they have a similar model with a slightly different name which is NOT the same at
    > all. Anyway this seat changed my ride significantly. A couple weeks after purchase we did an
    > organized 76 mile tour with no issues whatsoever in the rear department where only 2 weeks before
    > I was literally dying at around 40 mi. During a ferry crossing we saw a few other guys with the
    > same saddle and their reviews were the same.
    >
    > What makes this saddle different? It doesn't look like any other saddle out there to me. The width
    > in the back and the overall styling makes it just look more anatomically correct. Also, part of
    > the rail system is carbon fiber, and it has an elastomer suspension. The saddle is 320 grams, but
    > I can very easily say "who cares" about the exta 100 grams. I picked my up from Colorado Cyclist
    > for 80 bucks. It may be called the "Trans Am", but it rides like a Lexus to me!!!
    >
    > Good luck!
     
  4. B Young

    B Young Guest

    > You'd have to have more than that to recommend a particular saddle. Each butt is different, and
    > what works for you may not for the next guy.

    I think that is what I said at the top of my post.

    How are people supposed to buy saddles then? Since most LBS stock only a couple (round here anyway)
    are you supposed to just order one that looks pretty/fast/comfortable/etc from a 1/2 inch photo in
    a catalog?

    Thats almost what I did (picking from dozens of models) until someone recommended the Trans Am to
    me. Just because he liked it didn't mean I would like it, but a recommendation of quality along with
    a recommendation that he found it comfortable and of unique design which he felt set it apart from
    the crowd was enough to convince me to buy that one instead of randomly picking one out of a book.

    Secondly, there seems to be a lack of saddles for people who ride but aren't hard core racers. This
    group of us who tour and might do 75 or a century once a year and ride 25-40 miles every other week
    don't need some fluffy seat off a beach cruise nor do we need some 100 gram pro saddle. It is in
    this area that I feel the Trans Am fills in a gap. I found it frustrating trying to locate such a
    saddle so I figured I'd give my two cents.
     
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