My second cat 4 race - another video for you guys to watch.



CAMPYBOB

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Quote by Colnago62:
"I wonder what the average, "Time In The Sport" for a bike racer is these days?"

Good question. I wonder if USAC/USCF tracks that statistic.

43 years for me. Much less time in competition since the age of 45 though.

I see the younger guys 'competing' more on STRAVA than in organized races. They are smart enough to eliminate some of the dangers of actual racing and when they do actually line up, it's for ITT's, cyclo-cross, the ever popular Mtb. races or the newest non-roadie fad...gravel grinders.

Everyone has a brace of mountainbikes, a pair of crossers, a full blown tri or TT bike and a dedicated gravel bike set up and ready to go.

The days of a fellow concentrating on road events is pretty well reduced to a fanatic few in my area.

They don't seem to stay licensed or active into the veteran/masters ranks like they once did. While there never was a ton of juniors in my area, there are very few hitting the scene now...a trend continuing from the early 2000's (as a guess).
 

collin2985

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Dangerous Solo Attacks & Trains to No where - if I'm not getting any better at racing, at least my titles are improving.
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swampy1970

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How can you be doing 5mph and 30rpm when you're waiting on the start line and then within seconds you're above 25mph? Sir Chris Hoy can't accelerate that fast and he's a track God! Colin must recalibrate! How do you manage to sprint out of the saddle without the bike really going side to side much? That's the total opposite of what it supposed to happen...
 

collin2985

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Originally Posted by swampy1970

How can you be doing 5mph and 30rpm when you're waiting on the start line and then within seconds you're above 25mph? Sir Chris Hoy can't accelerate that fast and he's a track God!

Colin must recalibrate!

How do you manage to sprint out of the saddle without the bike really going side to side much? That's the total opposite of what it supposed to happen...
The Garmin 500 uses GPS unless the speed sensor is in use. My guess is that the GPS signal was crappy and tracking my position as moving around at 5 mph all over until the speed sensor on my back wheel took over once I started moving. If you watch it again closely, I start moving at 0:19 and hit 25 mph at 0:29 which is 10 seconds. I don't think that's unreasonable at all.

I have one of those energy efficient (green) sprints that uses up to 600 watts less than conventional sprinters.
 

Colnago62

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Track sprinters are much more quite on the bike than road sprinters. I have always wondered why. My guess has always been that road sprinters are sprinting after many miles of racing. Match sprinters have fresh legs.
 

Bluman

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I'm still enjoying all these videos and sad to say that I chickened out of my first Cat 5 race. I've yet to ride in a large group and I didn't be "that guy" with no situational awareness and no experience in a peloton. So when I saw that the field was 35+ riders, I chickened out. My plan was to simply hang on to the back of the field..... but I have this habit of getting competitive and didn't trust myself in a big field. Would it be better to find a local club and jump in on some 10+ ppl group rides and get comfortable with that before I actually try a crit?
 

danfoz

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Originally Posted by Bluman
I'm still enjoying all these videos and sad to say that I chickened out of my first Cat 5 race. I've yet to ride in a large group and I didn't be "that guy" with no situational awareness and no experience in a peloton. So when I saw that the field was 35+ riders, I chickened out. My plan was to simply hang on to the back of the field..... but I have this habit of getting competitive and didn't trust myself in a big field. Would it be better to find a local club and jump in on some 10+ ppl group rides and get comfortable with that before I actually try a crit?
Definitely. And the truth is, even finishing a race with the bunch, let alone getting a good result, is about conservation of energy. Being uncomfortable and tense can open a slow trickle on available energy, and holding wheels further out than the sweet spot of the draft can deplete massive amounts of energy, especially if the hammer is down and the pace is above one's usual cruising speed.

I wouldn't spend too much time practicing to be perfect, as much of racing is indeed trial by fire, but a month or two of spirited weekend group rides with several other riders learning to hold wheels, getting comfortable with others around, gaining some confidence, and learning how to manage ones resources in a paceline and discover ones limits under duress are a good idea. (hint: new riders usually always pull too hard and for a little too long at the front - after 10 seconds it's fine to pull off from the front, and whatever happens do not ratchet up the pace while at the front... that's noob mistake #1),

if you can find them, maybe try starting with a couple road races to get your confidence up. They are a safer bet than crits, and a little confidence can go a long way to riding a bike smoothly, safely, and efficiently.

But be grateful that it's only 35 or so. My local Cat5 races often fill to capacity at 50 riders, and my Cat4 field pretty much always maxes out at the 110 rider limit :)
 

swampy1970

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Bluman said:
I'm still enjoying all these videos and sad to say that I chickened out of my first Cat 5 race.  I've yet to ride in a large group and I didn't be "that guy" with no situational awareness and no experience in a peloton.  So when I saw that the field was 35+ riders, I chickened out.  My plan was to simply hang on to the back of the field..... but I have this habit of getting competitive and didn't trust myself in a big field.  Would it be better to find a local club and jump in on some 10+ ppl group rides and get comfortable with that before I actually try a crit?
Check out some local mid week club rides and have a look to see if there are any mid week races in your area. Some districts have crits and races that are geared to newcomers and there are some experienced riders that'll ride in the group and pass on information to those that look a little "lost" on what to do. The big thing is - relax. Don't stare at the wheel infront, instead look up the road and watch the riders rather than bikes. If people start looking around its a sign something's likely to happen. If someone up front suddenly puts their head down after looking around it's probably a sure sign of pending fun. Think of it as poker on wheels while bordering on anaerobic...
 

CAMPYBOB

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Nice race, Collin! You survived and most importantly at the end...you moved up!

You have some finishing speed...try not to get boxed in and rely on the other teams next time. I think you can finish it off in a podium position all by yourself.
 

Colnago62

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You should check out velodrome racing. It would greatly improve your sprinting as a lot of sprinting is knowing where to be and at what time. At a night of track racing, you might get as many as four races in. Also riding on the track helps you get used to close riding and helps improve bike handling. You spend some time racing the track and when you get back on the road, everything seems to move slower.
 

swampy1970

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CAMPYBOB said:
Nice race, Collin! You survived and most importantly at the end...you moved up! You have some finishing speed...try not to get boxed in and rely on the other teams next time. I think you can finish it off in a podium position all by yourself. 
I reckon he could do it too. A bit more experience, a willingness to let it all hang out about 250 yards to the line and 4 to 6 weeks of high intensity sprint training. Lots of 30 second intervals. It's not just a case of increasing power, it's the fact that if you don't sprint you don't know how to utilize all the muscles properly. That part alone, according to an ex Aussie sprint coach, can take years - but the learning curve is steep. Use training to work on form - use racing to practice it. Watch sprinters on video and practice. Old Robbie McEwan, Tom Boonen and some of Cav's stage wins with Team Sky. Loners that make the impossible, possible. If you're serious about the sprint, mark your sprint point before the start. No ifs, ands or buts - when you hit that point, gun it. No looking, no thinking, just balls out and go for it. Think sprint, nothing else. Look at the line and nothing else - not back, not sidewise, not down. Full sprint (phosphate stores) get you 6 maybe 7 seconds. Best controlled anaerobic effort - about 40. Use that 6 seconds wisely. Don't discount the "fear and loathing" of others to jump with 3 to 5 minutes to go. Nail it with a couple of miles to go if you have the watts will have the lemmings looking at each other for someone else to jump while they're all thinking of launching second rate lead out trains. Whether it's a sprint or a long shot, see how you feel with about 10 minutes to go and pick a strategy. Stick with it and commit 100%. Do not look over your shoulder Colin. If you go for the long shot, elbows in, head down (don't forget to look where you're going) and don't get overly excited. Give it everything you have and make sure you stay on top of the gear. Someone mentioned track sprinting. I wouldn't recommend that - it's too specialized but track racing like points races would work well if there's a track anywhere close. Close racing and lots of high efforts. Midweek crits and anything that mentions "devil take the hindmost" or similar are worthwhile. The devil is an evil, evil race for non-sprinters...
 

Colnago62

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No, no, no. Match sprinters are pretty much the opposite of road riders. If you dig into the backgrounds of some very talented pros, many came to prominence on the track. Ekimove, Wiggins, Cavendish all have distinguished careers on the track. The mass start races will give an opportunity spend some time practicing your sprint several times a night. It looks to me like you have the speed, just maybe not in the best position to use it to your full potential. The down side is it more equipment that costs more $$$.
 
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swampy1970

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Let's not blow Colin's trumpet here. If he had the speed he wouldn't be 4th Cat right now but the lad shows tenacity and improvement so there's hope... Those with natural talent wander off up the road and then look around and wonder where everyone else is. I never had that talent on the flat but was made to suffer immensely by those that did.
 

steve

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Originally Posted by Colnago62

No, no, no. Match sprinters are pretty much the opposite of road riders.
Funny that, over here if you want to be a pro roadie as a kid, you're probably better off concentrating on track racing or cross MTB racing.
 

Colnago62

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Match sprinters are usually very large, 180lbs or more. To make matters worse, the good ones are a bundle of fast twitch muscle fiber, which means they usually have very low endurance compared to a road rider. Marty Nothstein, who has Olympic gold, worlds jerseys and coutless National Champion wins, switched to the road and pretty much struggled. Eric Heiden, who was a speed skater had some success, but I wouldn't call him a great road rider. Now track pursuit riders, on the other hand.....
 

CAMPYBOB

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Nice ride video, Cube! I could practically taste that bier..er..beer at the end of the ride!

I could have used that video yesterday...rain here in Ohio and my riding and hay mowing plans went to Hell in a hand basket. I ended up doing one hour on the trainer listening to vocal trance and and anthem trance.
 

Bluman

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAMPYBOB .
Nice ride video, Cube! I could practically taste that bier..er..beer at the end of the ride!

I could have used that video yesterday...rain here in Ohio and my riding and hay mowing plans went to Hell in a hand basket. I ended up doing one hour on the trainer listening to vocal trance and and anthem trance.

Yeah, rain in Ohio these last couple weeks hasn't been so nice for my riding plans or my brother's hay mowing plans.... but at least we haven't gotten rained on yet. *knocks on wood* Last year we had nearly 2500 bales of straw caught untarped in a popup storm... being extra cautious this year.

Quote: ...very large, 180lbs or more...
If that's very large for cycling... I don't think I could ever be anything less than 'very large'.
 

coopers98

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Love these vids! Only downside is that it is just more ammunition to keep me distracted from getting 'work' done!
 

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