National Parks Service Likes Mountain Biking!

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Joz, May 4, 2005.

  1. Joz

    Joz New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2004
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    http://www.imba.com/news/news_releases/05_05/05_02_nps_imba.html

    Summary: For the first time, National Park Service leaders in Washington, D.C., have formally recognized mountain biking as a positive activity, compatible with the values of our National Park system.

    Story:

     
    Tags:


  2. j

    j Guest

    Somebody wrote:
    > http://www.imba.com/news/news_releases/05_05/05_02_nps_imba.html
    >> lengthy process to open singletrack to bicycle use, appropriate dirt
    >> roads may be opened with a more straightforward administrative process.


    Huh? Dirt _roads_ are normally closed to MTBs in national parks?
    Are these "roads" closed to all vehicles, or can I tear 'em
    up in my truck? A dirt road closed to mountain bikes. That is just
    stupid. Of course, if it is closed to vehicles, who can patrol it?

    j
     
  3. Dave W

    Dave W Guest

    "Chris Phillipo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >>
    >> http://www.imba.com/news/news_releases/05_05/05_02_nps_imba.html
    >>
    >> Summary: For the first time, National Park Service leaders in
    >> Washington, D.C., have * formally recognized mountain biking as a
    >> positive activity, compatible with the values of our National Park
    >> system. *
    >>
    >> Story:
    >>

    >
    > In a related story, mikey vandyman has been put on suicide watch at
    > Bellview.
    > --
    > _________________________
    > Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia
    > http://www.ramsays-online.com


    Exxxxcellent Smithers!
     
  4. j wrote:
    > Somebody wrote:
    > > http://www.imba.com/news/news_releases/05_05/05_02_nps_imba.html
    > >> lengthy process to open singletrack to bicycle use, appropriate

    dirt
    > >> roads may be opened with a more straightforward administrative

    process.
    >
    > Huh? Dirt _roads_ are normally closed to MTBs in national parks?


    Many dirt roads (and paved) are closed to non NPS vehicles.

    > Are these "roads" closed to all vehicles, or can I tear 'em
    > up in my truck?


    Check 36CFR261 and 36CFR212. Closures can be to all vehicles or to a
    specific group.

    > A dirt road closed to mountain bikes. That is just
    > stupid. Of course, if it is closed to vehicles, who can patrol it?


    Just because it is public land, does not mean that there is public
    access. A road that is closed to personal vehicles may be patrolled by
    NPS vehicles ... or on foot ...or on horseback ... or by plane ... or

    R
     
  5. Ken

    Ken Guest

    j <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    > Huh? Dirt _roads_ are normally closed to MTBs in national parks?
    > Are these "roads" closed to all vehicles, or can I tear 'em
    > up in my truck? A dirt road closed to mountain bikes. That is just
    > stupid. Of course, if it is closed to vehicles, who can patrol it?


    Those are mostly fire roads, maintained for fire fighting crews.
    They are closed to the public. They are patrolled by park rangers.
     
  6. Ken wrote:
    > j <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    > > Huh? Dirt _roads_ are normally closed to MTBs in national parks?
    > > Are these "roads" closed to all vehicles, or can I tear 'em
    > > up in my truck? A dirt road closed to mountain bikes. That is

    just
    > > stupid. Of course, if it is closed to vehicles, who can patrol it?

    >
    > Those are mostly fire roads, maintained for fire fighting crews.


    You seem to be confusing the USDA and the DOI. The vast majority of
    wildland fire crews are USDA. For that matter the DOI has only two hot
    shot crews Arrowhead and Alpine (Bison IHC was killed in '85). The
    practice of cutting fire roads is, generally, unheard for the NPS.
    Although it does occur in areas that are under joint NFS/NPS or NPS/BLM
    management. Or in active fire areas ... but those "roads" are generally
    restored after the fire.

    R

    Anyone old enough to remember Arrowhead 1,2, and 3.
     
  7. routebeer

    routebeer Guest

    Joz wrote:
    > http://www.imba.com/news/news_releases/05_05/05_02_nps_imba.html
    >
    > Summary: For the first time, National Park Service leaders in
    > Washington, D.C., have * formally recognized mountain biking as a
    > positive activity, compatible with the values of our National Park
    > system. *
    >
    > Story:
    >
    > > IMBA Signs Breakthrough Agreement with National Park Service
    > > For Immediate Release
    > > 05-02-05
    > > Contact: Pete Webber, IMBA communications director
    > > [email protected]
    > > 303-545-9011
    > >
    > >
    > > If you've ever tried to enjoy a National Park by mountain bike,

    chances
    > > are you've been disappointed. With some notable exceptions,

    America's
    > > premier park system is closed to off-road riding.
    > >
    > > That's going to change with a new five-year agreement just signed

    by
    > > the International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA) and the
    > > National Park Service. For the first time, National Park Service
    > > leaders in Washington, D.C., have formally recognized mountain

    biking
    > > as a positive activity, compatible with the values of our National

    Park
    > > system.
    > >
    > > A benefit to millions of bicyclists is the potential opportunity

    for
    > > new access to hundreds of dirt roads in National Park units that

    have
    > > been closed to bicycling. While National Park Service rules require

    a
    > > lengthy process to open singletrack to bicycle use, appropriate

    dirt
    > > roads may be opened with a more straightforward administrative

    process.
    > >
    > >
    > > "This agreement represents a true breakthrough for mountain

    biking,"
    > > said IMBA Executive Director Mike Van Abel. "It opens the door for
    > > individual park units to partner with mountain bikers and

    investigate
    > > new riding opportunities on a case-by-case basis."
    > >
    > > "The National Park Service is committed to increasing public

    awareness
    > > of outdoor recreational opportunities in the national park system

    that
    > > promote health and fitness," said Karen Taylor-Goodrich, the

    Associate
    > > Director for Visitor and Resource Protection."And mountain

    bicycling in
    > > authorized areas can be an excellent way to enjoy America's outdoor
    > > heritage in a manner that is compatible with resource protection."
    > >
    > > As part of the agreement, IMBA and the Park Service will initially
    > > partner on two pilot projects to be selected later this year. The
    > > projects will bring mountain bikers and park officials together for
    > > on-the-ground teamwork and serve as models for future

    collaboration.
    > >
    > > Additionally, IMBA will provide technical and volunteer assistance

    to
    > > National Park units that are interested in improving their off-road
    > > cycling opportunities. IMBA programs such as the National Mountain

    Bike
    > > Patrol, Subaru/IMBA Trail Care Crew and the IMBA club network can

    now
    > > apply their stewardship skills to our National Parks.
    > >
    > > Mountain biking can be a solution to many challenges facing

    National
    > > Parks today. Bicycling gets people out of their cars; away from
    > > congested roads, parking lots and trailheads; and out into the

    fresh
    > > air. Mountain biking can also encourage more active exploration of
    > > parks and counter the societal trend toward obesity.
    > >
    > > So what does the future hold? While mountain bikers shouldn't

    expect a
    > > revolution of new singletrack in National Parks, the partnership
    > > signals an encouraging direction for the future. With enhanced
    > > communication and cooperation between IMBA and the National Park
    > > Service, mountain bikers can anticipate that cycling opportunities

    in
    > > National Park units will continue to improve.
    > >
    > > The National Park Service manages 384 parks, monuments,

    battlefields,
    > > buildings and recreation areas and more than 80 million acres of

    U.S.
    > > public land. In 2004, National Parks hosted more than 276 million
    > > visitors.
    > >
    > > In 2002, IMBA formed a partnership with the Rivers, Trails &
    > > Conservation Assistance program of the National Park Service.

    Rivers &
    > > Trails helps communities build trail and greenway systems, restore
    > > rivers and wildlife habitat, and preserve open space. Their work
    > > largely focuses on urban and suburban locations, where demand for

    trail
    > > networks is the greatest.
    > >
    > > Visit IMBA's National Park Service Resource Page for the text of

    the
    > > agreement, speaking points, NPS parks with great riding, and other
    > > resources.
    > >
    > > About IMBA:
    > > Founded in 1988, the International Mountain Bicycling Association

    is a
    > > nonprofit educational association whose mission is to create,

    enhance
    > > and preserve trail opportunities for mountain bikers worldwide by
    > > encouraging low-impact riding, volunteer trailwork, cooperation

    among
    > > different trail user groups and innovative trail management

    solutions.
    > > IMBA's worldwide network is comprised of individual members,

    bicycle
    > > clubs, corporate partners and bicycle retailers.
    > >

    >
    >
    > --
    > Joz


    Gotta put an X in the loss column for this one, hey Mike?
     
Loading...
Loading...