Neck and shoulder pain during a long ride

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Andy Kriger, May 18, 2003.

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  1. Andy Kriger

    Andy Kriger Guest

    Like the subject says, I get neck and shoulder pain late into a long ride. I figure it's either my
    seat position or my body position. I realize some pain is inevitable from sitting in one position
    for a long period of time, but I'm hoping folks can offer pointers on what/how I need to adjust to
    minimize the pain.

    thx andy
     
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  2. > Like the subject says, I get neck and shoulder pain late into a long ride.
    I
    > figure it's either my seat position or my body position. I realize some
    pain
    > is inevitable from sitting in one position for a long period of time, but
    I'm
    > hoping folks can offer pointers on what/how I need to adjust to minimize
    the
    > pain.

    Check to see if your saddle's level. If it's tilted down even slightly at the front, neck & shoulder
    pain are a likely result.

    Other issues could be your saddle choice (yes, strange as it may seem, saddles can influence quite a
    few things, because it affects your ability/willingness to rotate over the front... if you have
    trouble there, then you tend to arch your back in order to reach the bars, which is a bad thing),
    the drop in height from the seat to the bars, and the overall reach from seat to bars.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  3. Ny Rides

    Ny Rides Guest

    Also check from time to time to see if you're tensing up your shoulders during the ride. I ride
    without suspension and find that, as the ride goes on, I sometimes subconsciously tense up my
    shoulders and elbows to ease up the shock of road bumps. Inevitably, this gives me soreness in these
    spots. I find that if I make an effort to relax these muscles every ten minutes or so, I can avoid
    the pain on long hauls.

    "Andy Kriger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Like the subject says, I get neck and shoulder pain late into a long ride.
    I
    > figure it's either my seat position or my body position. I realize some
    pain
    > is inevitable from sitting in one position for a long period of time, but
    I'm
    > hoping folks can offer pointers on what/how I need to adjust to minimize
    the
    > pain.
    >
    > thx andy
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, "NY Rides"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Also check from time to time to see if you're tensing up your shoulders during the ride. I ride
    > without suspension and find that, as the ride goes on, I sometimes subconsciously tense up my
    > shoulders and elbows to ease up the shock of road bumps. Inevitably, this gives me soreness in
    > these spots. I find that if I make an effort to relax these muscles every ten minutes or so, I can
    > avoid the pain on long hauls.
    >
    > "Andy Kriger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Like the subject says, I get neck and shoulder pain late into a long ride.
    > I
    > > figure it's either my seat position or my body position. I realize some
    > pain
    > > is inevitable from sitting in one position for a long period of time, but
    > I'm
    > > hoping folks can offer pointers on what/how I need to adjust to minimize
    > the
    > > pain.
    > >
    > > thx andy

    I get some pain too, the best thing is to stretch. There are some really good stretches for the neck
    and back. It really is more of a problem earlier in the season when you're not used to longer rides.
    I find it's better already.
     
  5. Harris

    Harris Guest

    Andy Kriger <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Like the subject says, I get neck and shoulder pain late into a long ride. I figure it's either my
    > seat position or my body position. I realize some pain is inevitable from sitting in one position
    > for a long period of time, but I'm hoping folks can offer pointers on what/how I need to adjust to
    > minimize the pain.

    How high are your handlebars relative to the top of the saddle? Often raising the bars will help.
    Also, if you wear glasses or have a helmet visor, you may be tilting your head way back to see the
    road. That will do a number on your neck. Sounds like you might benefit from a fit session.

    Art Harris
     
  6. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Mon, 19 May 2003 19:28:14 GMT, Harris <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Also, if you wear glasses or have a helmet visor, you may be tilting your head way back to see the
    >road. That will do a number on your neck. Sounds like you might benefit from a fit session.

    Give in to the Dark Side, young Jedi! Wind resistance is futile :)

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
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