Need a bike for centuries and around-town use

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by wiggles, Apr 13, 2009.

  1. wiggles

    wiggles New Member

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    Hey all! I've set my goal for the year at, at minimum, a half metric century though if I get there early I may give a full century a shot. However, right now I'm running a trek 820 mtb. I had been looking at a Surly Long Haul Trucker but I think a touring bike is a good bit overkill for what I'm looking at doing.

    So, what I need are suggestions for something that can be used for centuries, and generic around town use. What sort of bike? Any specific models?

    The local stores stock mostly Cannondale, Surly, and Trek. I'd like to keep it sub $1000 if possible, but I might consider going for financing if necessary.
     
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  2. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    Do you plan to leave the bike chained up outside?
     
  3. wiggles

    wiggles New Member

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    Most likely not. If I have the bike with me to run to the store it'll most likely be to quick run in and out, and I'll have a u-lock with me. The rest of the time it'll be stored indoors under lock and key.
     
  4. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Sometimes it is good to get a new bike ... sometimes, it isn't.

    What is the vintage of your TREK 820? I ask because TREK recycled some number designations through the years.

    Instead of a SURLY LHT (nothing wrong with that frame/fork, of course!), you could just buy a solid fork (if you have one of the more recent 820 bikes) & ditch the RST suspension fork that it may have.

    If it is one of the older, 90s vintage 820 bikes with a solid fork & threaded headset, then it was probably a reasonably nice frame with "okay" components which you could just update to some nicer components for between $300-to-$600 (cost depends on whether you buy through eBay or your LBS) ...

    If you think about the components which you might buy with the intention of eventually putting them on one of the other frames you have been considering then the impact on your wallet will feel more reasonable AND when you are satisfied that you have the components you want, you can decide if your TREK frame is good for another decade of service or if a SURLY/(whatever) is in your future ...

    For the Century you plan to ride, if you use your current bike, then I recommend new tires/tubes (street slicks, of course) ...

    ALSO, new grips + a new pair of gloves if you haven't changed them in the past couple of years.

    If your cables/housing are in good condition, then just lube them, otherwise, consider replacing them.

    Possibly, the same for your brake pads if they are worn, otherwise, just clean any glaze off the brake surface with some sandpaper. ...

    Check your chainrings/chain/cogs for possible replacement/upgrade ...

    BTW. If 'I' were buying a new, do-everything bike in the $1000 range, I would probably get the MASI "touring" bike which retails for about $1200.
     
  5. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    I recommend the narrowest street slicks your rim width can safely handle. An MTB should be more than fine for a half metric century. Then you can take more time to sort out what you want. Maybe ride a few bikes.

    I think a suspension fork is fine for street use except for climbing where you have to stand up. The few I have tried seem to stay at the top of their travel on the street and don't eat up any of your power.

    I think in the early 90's some entrants in the TDF even had front suspension.
     
  6. celia123

    celia123 New Member

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    Hi, i recommend this Novara Buzz V Bike, I use this bike as a daily commuter bike. It's a little heavy, but the big tires (26 x 1.9), relaxed angles, and long wheelbase give me the stability to ride in traffic on bad streets with confidence.
     
  7. jackson123

    jackson123 New Member

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    Have you got your bike, wiggles vbmenu_register("postmenu_3886925", true); ?
     
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