need a new chain

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Penny S., Apr 2, 2003.

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  1. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    does it really matter what kind I replace with? C'mon, be gentle with me.

    Penny
     
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  2. Bill Porter

    Bill Porter Guest

    On Wed, 2 Apr 2003 19:41:34 -0800, "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >does it really matter what kind I replace with? C'mon, be gentle with me.
    >
    >Penny
    >
    My personal experience has been this with shamino chains"

    The IG and HG chains - Have broken/busted them in the past (total of 3) The XTR/Dura-Ace chain -
    Have not broken one yet.

    Have not tired some of the other brands of chains I am a fairly big guy and feel I put the chains
    through its paces.

    My 2 cents.

    Bill Porter www.mountainbikebill.com
     
  3. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > does it really matter what kind I replace with? C'mon, be gentle with me.

    8-speed or 9, SRAM's are fine.

    High-end or -low, they just plain go.

    So go forth quickly to your LBS,

    and if they ask who sent ya, tell 'em B.S.

    Bill "finish weak" S.

    (PS: PC-99 is what I use; PC59 is a good "value" choice, IMO.)
     
  4. Nelson Binch

    Nelson Binch Guest

    "Sorni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    |
    | "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    | news:[email protected]...
    |
    | > does it really matter what kind I replace with? C'mon, be gentle with
    me.
    |
    | 8-speed or 9, SRAM's are fine.
    |
    | High-end or -low, they just plain go.
    |
    | So go forth quickly to your LBS,
    |
    | and if they ask who sent ya, tell 'em B.S.
    |
    | Bill "finish weak" S.
    |
    | (PS: PC-99 is what I use; PC59 is a good "value" choice, IMO.)
    |
    |

    Eventually, my fleet will wear PC58s and 59s (for 8 and 8 speed, respectively.) They are the most
    trouble free chains I've ever used.

    However, changing to a new type of chain will often reveal wear to your cassette. It can feel like
    it is constantly out of gear or skipping or just plain rough. Your cassette has worn on concert with
    the old one and the small differences between the two types (or even between an old and a fresh
    chain) can be enough to mess up the shifting.

    One word of advice, though, is to put on (or have put on) the chain and ride it yourself. Your LBS
    might push to go ahead and change the cassette, but try it out first. Could save you $30-$50.

    ---
    __o _`\(,_ Cycling is life, (_)/ (_) all the rest, just details. Nelson Binch =^o.o^=
    http://intergalax.com

    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.465 / Virus Database: 263 -
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  5. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Nelson Binch wrote:
    > "Sorni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]...
    > |
    > | "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > | news:[email protected]...
    > |
    > | > does it really matter what kind I replace with? C'mon, be gentle with
    > me.
    > |
    > | 8-speed or 9, SRAM's are fine.
    > |
    > | High-end or -low, they just plain go.
    > |
    > | So go forth quickly to your LBS,
    > |
    > | and if they ask who sent ya, tell 'em B.S.
    > |
    > | Bill "finish weak" S.
    > |
    > | (PS: PC-99 is what I use; PC59 is a good "value" choice, IMO.)
    > |
    > |
    >
    > Eventually, my fleet will wear PC58s and 59s (for 8 and 8 speed, respectively.) They are the most
    > trouble free chains I've ever used.
    >
    > However, changing to a new type of chain will often reveal wear to your cassette. It can feel like
    > it is constantly out of gear or skipping or just plain rough. Your cassette has worn on concert
    > with the old one and the small differences between the two types (or even between an old and a
    > fresh chain) can be enough to mess up the shifting.
    >
    > One word of advice, though, is to put on (or have put on) the chain and ride it yourself. Your LBS
    > might push to go ahead and change the cassette, but try it out first. Could save you $30-$50.
    >
    >
    > ---
    > __o _`\(,_ Cycling is life, (_)/ (_) all the rest, just details. Nelson Binch =^o.o^=
    > http://intergalax.com
    >
    > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.465 / Virus Database: 263
    > - Release Date: 3/25/2003
    >
    >
    I have to agree with SRAM and the gears. I've use PC59 and PC99. I like the PC99 better -- for me,
    they last longer and shift bettor over their life, but you pay for it :). I've broken no-name and
    shimano chains, but never a SRAM -- but I'm not light (225 lbs).

    As to the gears, put the new chain on and pedal HARD. If you can make the chain skip, figgure out
    whether it's the cassette or the chainrings and if the chainrings, which ones need to be replaced
    (usually the granny and middle). You can tell if it's the cassette because only some of the gears
    will skip no matter which chainring you're in; for the chainrings, you'll get skip no matter which
    cassette rear you're in. If you can't isolate it, it's probably both :).

    If you want to ride while all of this is happening, make sure that you can put your old chain
    back on :).

    David
     
  6. Nelson Binch

    Nelson Binch Guest

    "David Kunz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | Nelson Binch wrote:
    | > "Sorni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    | > news:p[email protected]...
    | > |
    | > | "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    | > | news:[email protected]...
    | > |
    | > | > does it really matter what kind I replace with? C'mon, be gentle
    with
    | > me.
    | > |
    | > | 8-speed or 9, SRAM's are fine.
    | > |
    | > | High-end or -low, they just plain go.
    | > |
    | > | So go forth quickly to your LBS,
    | > |
    | > | and if they ask who sent ya, tell 'em B.S.
    | > |
    | > | Bill "finish weak" S.
    | > |
    | > | (PS: PC-99 is what I use; PC59 is a good "value" choice, IMO.)
    | > |
    | > |
    | >
    | > Eventually, my fleet will wear PC58s and 59s (for 8 and 8 speed, respectively.) They are the
    | > most trouble free chains I've ever used.
    | >
    | > However, changing to a new type of chain will often reveal wear to your cassette. It can feel
    | > like it is constantly out of gear or skipping or
    just
    | > plain rough. Your cassette has worn on concert with the old one and the small differences
    | > between the two types (or even between an old and a
    fresh
    | > chain) can be enough to mess up the shifting.
    | >
    | > One word of advice, though, is to put on (or have put on) the chain and
    ride
    | > it yourself. Your LBS might push to go ahead and change the cassette,
    but
    | > try it out first. Could save you $30-$50.
    | >
    | >
    | I have to agree with SRAM and the gears. I've use PC59 and PC99. I like the PC99 better -- for me,
    | they last longer and shift bettor over their life, but you pay for it :). I've broken no-name and
    | shimano chains, but never a SRAM -- but I'm not light (225 lbs).
    |
    | As to the gears, put the new chain on and pedal HARD. If you can make the chain skip, figgure out
    | whether it's the cassette or the chainrings and if the chainrings, which ones need to be replaced
    | (usually the granny and middle). You can tell if it's the cassette because only some of the gears
    | will skip no matter which chainring you're in; for the chainrings, you'll get skip no matter which
    | cassette rear you're in. If you can't isolate it, it's probably both :).
    |
    | If you want to ride while all of this is happening, make sure that you can put your old chain
    | back on :).

    Your actual mileage may vary, but my cassettes last 3-4 chains, chainrings 10+ chains. I've only had
    to replace my very oldest rings, and never RaceFace rings (granted, none of them are very old yet!)

    ---
    __o _`\(,_ Cycling is life, (_)/ (_) all the rest, just details. Nelson Binch =^o.o^=
    http://intergalax.com

    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.465 / Virus Database: 263 -
    Release Date: 3/25/2003
     
  7. ..::Tbf::..

    ..::Tbf::.. Guest

  8. Ctg

    Ctg Guest

    "Bill Porter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Wed, 2 Apr 2003 19:41:34 -0800, "Penny S."
    <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >does it really matter what kind I replace with? C'mon, be gentle with me.
    > >
    > >Penny

    Sachs/SRAM. Trying to fix a Shimano chain trailside (without that damn pin) converted me. Be sure to
    measure/count the links in your old chain to match 'em up.
    --
    Chris
    ________________
    www.chrisgroff.com
     
  9. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Nelson Binch wrote:
    > "David Kunz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > | Nelson Binch wrote:
    > | > "Sorni" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > | > news:p[email protected]...
    > | > |
    > | > | "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > | > | news:[email protected]...
    > | > |
    > | > | > does it really matter what kind I replace with? C'mon, be gentle
    > with
    > | > me.
    > | > |
    > | > | 8-speed or 9, SRAM's are fine.
    > | > |
    > | > | High-end or -low, they just plain go.
    > | > |
    > | > | So go forth quickly to your LBS,
    > | > |
    > | > | and if they ask who sent ya, tell 'em B.S.
    > | > |
    > | > | Bill "finish weak" S.
    > | > |
    > | > | (PS: PC-99 is what I use; PC59 is a good "value" choice, IMO.)
    > | > |
    > | > |
    > | >
    > | > Eventually, my fleet will wear PC58s and 59s (for 8 and 8 speed, respectively.) They are the
    > | > most trouble free chains I've ever used.
    > | >
    > | > However, changing to a new type of chain will often reveal wear to your cassette. It can feel
    > | > like it is constantly out of gear or skipping or
    > just
    > | > plain rough. Your cassette has worn on concert with the old one and the small differences
    > | > between the two types (or even between an old and a
    > fresh
    > | > chain) can be enough to mess up the shifting.
    > | >
    > | > One word of advice, though, is to put on (or have put on) the chain and
    > ride
    > | > it yourself. Your LBS might push to go ahead and change the cassette,
    > but
    > | > try it out first. Could save you $30-$50.
    > | >
    > | >
    > | I have to agree with SRAM and the gears. I've use PC59 and PC99. I like the PC99 better -- for
    > | me, they last longer and shift bettor over their life, but you pay for it :). I've broken
    > | no-name and shimano chains, but never a SRAM -- but I'm not light (225 lbs).
    > |
    > | As to the gears, put the new chain on and pedal HARD. If you can make the chain skip, figgure
    > | out whether it's the cassette or the chainrings and if the chainrings, which ones need to be
    > | replaced (usually the granny and middle). You can tell if it's the cassette because only some of
    > | the gears will skip no matter which chainring you're in; for the chainrings, you'll get skip no
    > | matter which cassette rear you're in. If you can't isolate it, it's probably both :).
    > |
    > | If you want to ride while all of this is happening, make sure that you can put your old chain
    > | back on :).
    >
    > Your actual mileage may vary, but my cassettes last 3-4 chains, chainrings 10+ chains. I've only
    > had to replace my very oldest rings, and never RaceFace rings (granted, none of them are very
    > old yet!)

    They only last that long for me when I replace my chain before it's life is up or rotate through a
    group of chains (what I'm doing now). When I run a chain until it's used up (shifts poorly or gets
    really loose), then I always need to replace gears and chainrings.

    David
     
  10. crazy6r54

    crazy6r54 Guest

    Sram is what like and make it all my replacements. Shimano was there when the bike was new
    but no more.

    Fire up MTB 03
     
  11. Nelson Binch

    Nelson Binch Guest

    "David Kunz" <[email protected]> wrote

    | > Your actual mileage may vary, but my cassettes last 3-4 chains,
    chainrings
    | > 10+ chains. I've only had to replace my very oldest rings, and never RaceFace rings (granted,
    | > none of them are very old yet!)
    |
    | They only last that long for me when I replace my chain before it's life is up or rotate through a
    | group of chains (what I'm doing now). When I run a chain until it's used up (shifts poorly or gets
    | really loose), then I always need to replace gears and chainrings.

    Part of the longevity of my drivetrains comes from being a major tinkerer. The RaceFace rings
    appeared long before the old rings (classic 110 XT) were anywhere near worn out. I replace chains
    often (a $15 chain is cheap insurance to keep the rest lasting longer)

    The one Shimano chain that has served me well is the IG90. I got it for my Prodigy when I mistakenly
    got an IG cassette (SRAM chains just don't work with them if they are the least bit worn!) and it
    works fine. When that cassette goes away, an XT will follow, along with a PC-99 chain (only the best
    for my beloved!)

    ---
    __o _`\(,_ Cycling is life, (_)/ (_) all the rest, just details. Nelson Binch =^o.o^=
    http://intergalax.com

    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.465 / Virus Database: 263 -
    Release Date: 3/25/2003
     
  12. > The one Shimano chain that has served me well is the IG90. I got it for
    my
    > Prodigy when I mistakenly got an IG cassette (SRAM chains just don't work with them if they are
    > the least bit worn!) and it works fine. When that cassette goes away, an XT will follow, along
    > with a PC-99 chain (only the best for my beloved!)
    >
    >
    Just out of curiousity, what do you have to pay for the PC-99? One of the major companies here in
    Sweden charge the equiv. of $42.

    Regards göran
     
  13. Nelson Binch

    Nelson Binch Guest

    "Göran Thyberg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | >
    | > The one Shimano chain that has served me well is the IG90. I got it for
    | my
    | > Prodigy when I mistakenly got an IG cassette (SRAM chains just don't
    work
    | > with them if they are the least bit worn!) and it works fine. When that cassette goes away, an
    | > XT will follow, along with a PC-99 chain (only
    the
    | > best for my beloved!)
    | >
    | >
    | Just out of curiousity, what do you have to pay for the PC-99? One of the major companies here in
    | Sweden charge the equiv. of $42.
    |
    | Regards göran
    |
    |

    With shipping, or proper LBS markup - right around $30-$35.

    A PC-59 (perfectly good, workaday chain) can be had around $15 (I've scored them as low as $10 but
    seen them as high as $25)

    ---
    __o _`\(,_ Cycling is life, (_)/ (_) all the rest, just details. Nelson Binch =^o.o^=
    http://intergalax.com

    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.467 / Virus Database: 266 -
    Release Date: 4/1/2003
     
  14. John G

    John G Guest

    Penny S. wrote:
    > does it really matter what kind I replace with? C'mon, be gentle with me.

    SRAM actyually, I found the cheaper the better, The SRAM PC-48 outlasts the 58 almost 2:1.

    Shitmano chains I can snap at will.
     
  15. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    John G <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Penny S. wrote:
    > > does it really matter what kind I replace with? C'mon, be gentle with
    me.
    >
    > SRAM actyually, I found the cheaper the better, The SRAM PC-48 outlasts the 58 almost 2:1.
    >
    > Shitmano chains I can snap at will.

    I used to do that with wet towels.

    Shaun aRe - fookin' hated the little bastard.
     
  16. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    > Nelson Binch wrote:
    >> However, changing to a new type of chain will often reveal wear to your cassette. It can feel
    >> like it is constantly out of gear or skipping or just plain rough. Your cassette has worn on
    >> concert with the old one and the small differences between the two types (or even between an old
    >> and a fresh chain) can be enough to mess up the shifting.
    >>
    >> One word of advice, though, is to put on (or have put on) the chain and ride it yourself. Your
    >> LBS might push to go ahead and change the cassette, but try it out first. Could save you $30-$50.
    >>

    OK, lots of good advice. Here's how I came to the determination about the chain anyway.

    Last summer Brian ( trusty lbs guy) said it was fine. The other say I asked him should I bring it in
    to check for wear and he said no, do this at home:

    take a really good accurate straight edge or ruler. measure extended (straight) section of chain
    from pin to pin at 12". He said a) to be really precise and b) that even if there was a much as
    +1/16" of wear to replace
    it. He said also that if it was more like 1/8" it was way over due. I came up with barely
    +1/16" of wear.

    I can do all the labor myself, no problem. If I was told wrong about how to do this that would be
    useful information. He had checked it last year when I first got the bike but I"ve added a few
    hundred miles since then.

    Penny
     
  17. > | >
    > | Just out of curiousity, what do you have to pay for the PC-99? One of the major companies here
    > | in Sweden charge the equiv. of $42.
    > |
    > | Regards göran
    > |
    > |
    >
    > With shipping, or proper LBS markup - right around $30-$35.
    >
    > A PC-59 (perfectly good, workaday chain) can be had around $15 (I've
    scored
    > them as low as $10 but seen them as high as $25)
    >

    Yes that's the one that sits on my bikes and it retails at $21-$23 around here.

    göran
     
  18. John G

    John G Guest

    Penny say's:

    > OK, lots of good advice. Here's how I came to the determination about the chain anyway.
    >
    > Last summer Brian ( trusty lbs guy) said it was fine. The other say I asked him should I bring it
    > in to check for wear and he said no, do this at home:
    >
    > take a really good accurate straight edge or ruler. measure extended (straight) section of chain
    > from pin to pin at 12". He said a) to be really precise and b) that even if there was a much as
    > +1/16" of wear to replace
    > it. He said also that if it was more like 1/8" it was way over due. I came up with barely +1/16"
    > of wear.

    Since chains are (relitively) cheap compared to cassettes I'd say it is best to replace the chain
    BEFORE you NEED to.

    > I can do all the labor myself, no problem. If I was told wrong about how to do this that would be
    > useful information.

    yup, right on.

    > Penny

    Answer the phone, I know you are home, and I know your not alone! This is the wooba gooba with the
    green teeth...........

    --
    John "Meatloaf" G.
     
  19. Nelson Binch

    Nelson Binch Guest

    "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote
    |
    |
    | OK, lots of good advice. Here's how I came to the determination about the chain anyway.
    |
    | Last summer Brian ( trusty lbs guy) said it was fine. The other say I
    asked
    | him should I bring it in to check for wear and he said no, do this at
    home:
    |
    | take a really good accurate straight edge or ruler. measure extended (straight) section of chain
    | from pin to pin at 12". He said a) to be
    really
    | precise and b) that even if there was a much as +1/16" of wear to replace
    | it. He said also that if it was more like 1/8" it was way over due. I
    came
    | up with barely +1/16" of wear.
    |
    | I can do all the labor myself, no problem. If I was told wrong about how
    to
    | do this that would be useful information. He had checked it last year
    when
    | I first got the bike but I"ve added a few hundred miles since then.

    Yep, that's the way. I've been doing that for years (with a 12+ inch Staedtler metal ruler left over
    from my Engineering school days) I just assumed you already knew it was time (if a chain is suspect
    at all, chuck it!)

    With the SRAM chain - use the master link. They work well and are actually better for the life of
    the chain than hard riveting it. Use the chain tool only to trim it to length.

    Quicker eyeball way of doing it - center the 0 of the ruler on a pin. If the 12 inch mark is off its
    pin, chuck the chain.

    ---
    __o _`\(,_ Cycling is life, (_)/ (_) all the rest, just details. Nelson Binch =^o.o^=
    http://intergalax.com

    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.467 / Virus Database: 266 -
    Release Date: 4/1/2003
     
  20. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Nelson Binch wrote:
    > "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >> Last summer Brian ( trusty lbs guy) said it was fine. The other say I asked him should I bring it
    >> in to check for wear and he said no, do this at home:
    >>
    >> take a really good accurate straight edge or ruler. measure extended (straight) section of chain
    >> from pin to pin at 12". He said a) to be really precise and b) that even if there was a much as
    >> +1/16" of wear to replace it. He said also that if it was more like 1/8" it was way over due. I
    >> came up with barely +1/16" of wear.
    >
    > Yep, that's the way. I've been doing that for years (with a 12+ inch Staedtler metal ruler left
    > over from my Engineering school days) I just assumed you already knew it was time (if a chain is
    > suspect at all, chuck it!)
    >
    > With the SRAM chain - use the master link. They work well and are actually better for the life of
    > the chain than hard riveting it. Use the chain tool only to trim it to length.
    >
    > Quicker eyeball way of doing it - center the 0 of the ruler on a pin. If the 12 inch mark is off
    > its pin, chuck the chain.

    isn't the whole point of checking it to do it BEFORE it's telling you it needs replacement?

    Penny
    >
    >
    > ---
    > __o _`\(,_ Cycling is life, (_)/ (_) all the rest, just details. Nelson Binch =^o.o^=
    > http://intergalax.com
    >
    > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.467 / Virus Database: 266
    > - Release Date: 4/1/2003
     
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